Ruchi Badola

Ruchi Badola
Wildlife Institute of India | WII · ecodevelopment planning and participatory [planning

Ph.D

About

85
Publications
72,653
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3,483
Citations
Citations since 2017
41 Research Items
2124 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400

Publications

Publications (85)
Article
As the world embraced Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) and its numerous benefits, the transforming nocturnal environment witnessed the negative impacts of this contaminant of emerging concern, and its consequent Light Pollution, on the fitness and populations of numerous organisms. Over the decades, India's unbridled population growth and rapid urb...
Article
Remote sensing provides multi-dimensional and multi-temporal information about habitat, insights into the significant drivers of change, and the key factors affecting landscape dynamics. Such information is crucial to provide perspective and a more profound understanding of ecological surveys. This study utilizes Google Earth Engine's capability to...
Article
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Globally, the river ecosystems are threatened due to human-driven exploitation and indiscriminate resource use. The rate of species loss is a magnitude higher in these ecosystems, hence, identifying conservation priority areas as refugia, using the flagship-cum-indicator species approach can aid in long-term conservation of multiple species and ens...
Article
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The wellbeing of mountain communities is determined by the availability and accessibility of ecosystem goods and services. We assessed the relationship between forest quality and wellbeing of local communities of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) in the Upper Ganga River Basin, Western Himalayas, India. We used 14 relevant Sustainable Development...
Article
Full-text available
As a traditional water source, springs are vital for Himalayan communities and it is essential to consciously focus on springs conservation. We report oxygen isotopes (δ18O) of spring water before, within, and after the tectonically active zones of the Alaknanda Valley, Uttarakhand. Higher variation of δ18O in the spring waters is found in highly t...
Article
Full-text available
The Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) also known as the Himalayan black bear is a Vulnerable species. Its range is distributed throughout southern and eastern Asia. Here we report the first photographic evidence of the species in Kaziranga Tiger Reserve situated in the northeast of India. The photo-captured image of the species has unfolded var...
Article
Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) is prone to climate shock and is highly sensitive to minor climate variance. Yet, there is a dearth of studies evaluating the adaptive capacity and vulnerability of the socio-ecological system. We assessed the household (n = 1346) and village (n = 77) level adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate stress in Beas,...
Article
Biomass and bioenergy are important for energy security in the rural areas of the developing countries. The sustainability of using biomass for energy security and reducing carbon emission for climate adaptation is an area of concern. Here we assessed the forest biomass use pattern in the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) and factors influencing the us...
Article
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Jarman–Bell (1974) hypothesized that in the dry savanna of Africa, small-bodied herbivores tend to browse more on forage with high protein and low fibre content. This implies browsing on high nutritive forage by meso-herbivores, and grazing and mixed feeding on coarse forage by mega-herbivores. We tested this hypothesis in the riverine alluvial gra...
Presentation
Across the large part of Indian Himalayan Region, women form the backbone of local economy, which is an integrated system of traditional agriculture and livestock rearing, dependent on forest (phyto)resources. The study was conducted in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary Landscape, a Western Himalayan Protected Area. The inhabitants of the landscape are...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a “Green List of Species” (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species’ progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Escalation of human–wildlife conflict (HWC) is a barrier to the conservation of ecological corridors across the globe. The existing mechanisms to counter HWC are either economically and socially taxing, or ineffective for long-term management. We assessed HWC in the corridor linking the Rajaji and Corbett Tiger Reserves in Uttarakhand, India, and i...
Preprint
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Damming and diverting river water alters the channel characteristics and natural flow regime. The change in biotic and abiotic factors results in dissimilar habitat conditions upstream and downstream of the barrage. Given the habitat dissimilarity and therefore resource availability, we hypothesized the dissimilarity in waterbird abundance and spec...
Article
Agricultural communities in the Himalayas are especially vulnerable to the shocks of climate change. An improved understanding of how residents perceive changes to climate and agroecosystems is critical to creating and implementing locally appropriate adaptation strategies. In this study, we administered a questionnaire to 251 residents within 16 v...
Article
Full-text available
River conservation planning is complicated by its inherent connectivity, variations in habitat features and difficulties in conserving entire rivers. Economic and social constraints in human-dominated river systems, such as the Ganga, further complicate planning. A multistage systemic analysis was performed to identify policy gaps and recommend the...
Article
Himalayan communities that depend on rain-fed agriculture are disproportionately vulnerable to climate change. In this study, we compare local perceptions of climate change from a household survey (n = 251) to climate data obtained from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS 2.1) and MODIS Terra Snow Cover data product datasets. The study...
Article
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The population of the globally endangered hog deer (Axis porcinus) has declined severely across its geographic range. Intensive monitoring of its demographic and genetic status is necessary. We examined the demographic and genetic structure of a small hog deer population in Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP), located on the western fringe of the In...
Article
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Sitas, N., Z. V. Harmáčková, J. A. Anticamara, A. Arneth, R. Badola, R. Biggs, R. Blanchard, L. Brotons, M. Cantele, K. Coetzer, R. DasGupta, E. Den Belder, S. Ghosh, A. Guisan, H. Gundimeda, M. Hamann, P. A. Harrison, S. Hashimoto, J. Hauck, B. Klatt, K. Kok, R. M. Krug, A. Niamir, P. J. O'Farrell, S. Okayasu, I. Palomo, L. M. Pereira, P. Riordan,...
Book
Full-text available
Freshwater habitats are the most vulnerable habitat in current global change scenario. These habitats occupy less than 1% of the world’s surface area and provide shelter to many Endemic and Threatened species. Among the freshwater habitats, river ecosystems are more prone for large-scale modifications due to various river course modifications and l...
Chapter
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Mountains make up 24% of the world’s land area, are home to 20% of the world’s population, provide 60–80% of the world’s fresh water, and harbour 50% of the world’s biodiversity hotspots (well-established). The United Nations recognized the importance of mountain ecosystems, both for conserving biological diversity and for sustaining humanity, in C...
Article
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The trade of Himalayan caterpillar fungus, or Ophiocordyceps sinensis, is believed to have transformed the rural economy of certain Himalayan villages. Most scholarly work on the caterpillar fungus focuses on its ecology, physiology, and pharmacological attributes, followed by conservation and sustainability issues. Few studies have tried to unders...
Poster
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Keibul Lamjao National Park is the only last remaining home for endangered deer species Sangai (Rucervus eldii eldii). Assessment of socio-economic status and estimation of forest dependency of the local people on the Park's resources was studied using quantitative method through household questionnaire survey and monitoring of different entry/exit...
Article
Tourism has the potential to advance biodiversity conservation through the creation of societal constituency by providing alternative livelihood to resource-dependent communities. Institutional arrangements play a crucial role in ensuring equitable benefit sharing of tourism gains among different stakeholders. We examined this role of institutional...
Article
Full-text available
This study explored the resilience of mountain forests in a protected area in Alaknanda River basin, Western Himalaya, to various disturbance scenarios. The resource dependency of village communities in the Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary Landscape was studied through a questionnaire survey in 10 villages situated along an elevational gradient. Vegeta...
Article
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The Terai Arc Landscape in the foothills of the Himalaya is a critical tiger conservation unit straddling India and Nepal. The Nandhaur Wildlife Sanctuary (NWS) located in the eastern part of this landscape, is an important corridor for the movement of large mammalian species. This landscape is under tremendous pressure due to increased human popul...
Article
Monitoring of streamflow may help to determine the optimum levels of its use for sustainable water management in the face of climate change. We reviewed available methods for monitoring streamflow on the basis of six criteria viz. their applicability across different terrains and size of the streams, operational ease, time effectiveness, accuracy,...
Article
Located in the foothills of the Indian Himalaya, Rajaji National Park was established to protect and enhance the habitat of the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and tiger (Panthera tigris). In 2002 the Van Gujjars, indigenous forest pastoralists, were voluntarily resettled from the Chilla Range (an administrative unit of Rajaji National Park) to Ga...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change has numerous implications for members of mountain communities who feel the impacts in both physical and social dimensions. In the western Himalayas of India, a majority of residents maintain a livelihood strategy that includes a combination of subsistence or small-scale agriculture, livestock rearing, seasonal or long-term mig...
Article
This paper presents the results of research conducted in a village on the south-eastern boundary of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) which has experienced rapid and dramatic social–ecological change as a result of tiger-related tourism. Our aim was to better understand the impacts of wildlife tourism on the forest ecosystem, village structure, solidarit...
Article
We examined existing policy instruments of the Indian forest, wildlife, and environment sectors for the period 1927-2008 to (a) assess their strengths and weaknesses in addressing information, market and policy failures in ecosystem service provision in the Indian Himalayan region and (b) determine if they were informatory or regulatory in nature a...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change has numerous implications for members of mountain communities who feel the impacts in both physical and social dimensions. In the Western Himalayas of India, a majority of residents maintain a livelihood strategy that includes a combination of subsistence or small-scale agriculture, seasonal pastoral migration, male out-migrat...
Article
Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these r...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated the livelihood linkages of existing tourism practices in Kaziranga National Park, a World Heritage site located in Assam, India. The main objective of the study was to assess the contribution of tourism to local livelihoods and suggest ways to strengthen these linkages. Focus group discussions and interviews of tourism service provider...
Article
The Keibul Lamjao National Park is located in the southeastern part of the Loktak Lake, Manipur, India. The characteristic feature of the Park is the presence of floating meadows locally known as phumdi. A floristic study was carried out during 2005-2010 to get an insight into the plant species composition of the Park. A total of 185 plant species...
Article
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The Loktak Lake is the largest freshwater lake in northeastern India and is significant because of its hydrological and ecological services, and the socioeconomic and cultural values that it represents. This study assesses the economic linkages between the Loktak Lake and the local people living around it, through socioeconomic surveys. The major o...
Article
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a b s t r a c t The ecological and economic importance of mangrove ecosystems is well established and highlighted by studies establishing a correlation between the protective function of mangroves and the loss of lives and property caused by coastal hazards. Nevertheless, degradation of this ecosystem remains a matter of concern, emphasizing the fa...
Article
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This paper examines the economic value of selected ecosystem services of Corbett Tiger Reserve, India. The direct cost was derived from secondary sources, and indirect and opportunity costs through socioeconomic surveys. For recreational value the individual approach to travel cost method was used, and to assess carbon sequestration the replacement...
Article
This study tests the potential utility of Stakeholder Analysis to Protected Area management. Using Corbett National Park (CNP), India, as a case study, Stakeholder Analysis (SA) was used to identify important stakeholder groups and assess their relationships, relative power and importance. This exercise was undertaken to assist the managers of CNP...
Article
Full-text available
The consumptive benefits of mangrove forests to subsistence economy receive little recognition. This paper quantifies the value of provisioning services of mangrove forests to local livelihoods in terms of forestry and fishery products. To examine the use of mangrove products, 324 households from 36 villages in the Bhitarkanika Conservation Area lo...
Article
The dependence of coastal communities on mangrove forests for direct consumptive use due to the scarcity of alternate resources makes them one of the highly disturbed landscapes. This paper examines the spatial characteristics and extent of anthropogenic disturbances affecting the mangrove forests of Bhitarkanika Conservation Area situated along th...
Article
There has been a growing realization that the conventional 'Gun and Guard' method of conservation is no more effective in dealing with the socio-ecological complexity and political dimensions of biodiversity conservation. Handling these challenges require an integrated approach that recognizes the interconnectedness of social and ecological systems...
Article
Full-text available
The unique assemblages of flora and fauna in the Himalayan region make it one of the most important biodiversity hotspots on the Indian subcontinent. Seventy-five protected areas (PAs) encompassing 9.48% of the region have been created to conserve this biodiversity and the fragile Himalayan landscape (Figure 1). However, this has engendered conflic...
Article
Mangroves are highly productive wetland ecosystems strategically located at the interface between land and sea. They play an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of the coastal environment, acting as sources of nutrients to adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems through active and passive transport. We examined the nutrient contents in m...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines people’s experiences with economic compensation for losses due to human–wildlife conflict (HWC) in Uttarakhand, India. Employing a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches, we used a case study approach to investigate (1) socio-economic characteristics of applicant versus non-applicant households, (2) explanations...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing research interest in the ethnobiology, socio-economics and management of mangrove forests. Coastal residents who use mangroves and their resources may have considerable botanical and ecological knowledgeable about these forests. A wide variety of forest products are harvested in mangroves, especially wood for fuel and construction,...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands are rapidly disappearing from the earth's surface because of agricultural conversion and other land-use changes. The Indo-Gangetic biogeographic zone is a water-surplus area and it abounds in numerous wetlands and floodplains. Kabartal is one such freshwater wetland ecosystem situated in the mid Ganges basin. The wetland not only supports...
Article
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The Kabartal wetland situated in the upper Indo-Gangetic flood plains in northern India is significant because of its hydrological and ecological services, and the socio-economic and cultural values that it represents. Despite being designated as a wildlife sanctuary, this wetland is under threat from anthropogenic pressures. As in the case of most...