Rosey Billington

Rosey Billington
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of Languages and Linguistics

PhD

About

20
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (20)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Length contrasts among glides are typologically uncommon , and argued to be crosslinguistically dispreferred. Nevertheless , such contrasts are attested in various languages around the world, though phonetic explorations remain very limited. This paper presents selected findings pertaining to glides in Lo-pit, an Eastern Nilotic language for which...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of an acoustic investigation of lexical tone in the Dorik dialect of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language. Tonal phenomena in Nilotic languages are complex, and in many cases vastly underdescribed. In the limited descriptive work on Lopit, there is not yet a clear picture of the number of tones used for lexical contras...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of an acoustic and articulatory investigation of Advanced Tongue Root (ATR) in Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language. As a phonological feature, ATR is widely attested in African vowel systems, and is held to correlate with tongue root advancement as a corollary of pharyngeal expansion. In the limited descriptive work o...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous children growing up in the remote regions of Australia live in multilingual communities which are often undergoing rapid language shift. In these communities, children are exposed to a range of language input, including the traditional language of the area, a local creole and Standard Australian English. The extent to which the different...
Article
Speakers of creole languages experience educational disadvantage in schools that teach in the standard language of their region, but there remain many misconceptions about why this is the case and how best to facilitate academic improvement, despite research demonstrating that actively using creoles in the classroom leads to a range of positive out...
Conference Paper
This paper investigates a merger-in-progress of /e/-/ae/ in prelateral contexts for speakers of Australian English in Victoria. Twelve participants (7F, 5M) were recorded producing a wordlist resulting in acoustic and concurrent articulatory data via stabilised mid-sagittal ultrasound tongue imaging. Focusing on a subset of the data comprising shor...
Article
Nafsan (ISO 639-3: erk, Glottocode: sout2856), also known as South Efate, is a Southern Oceanic language of Vanuatu. It is spoken in Erakor, Eratap and Pango, three villages situated along the southern coast of the island of Efate (Figure 1) (Clark 1985, Lynch 2000, Thieberger 2006). Nafsan is also closely related to Eton, Lelepa, Nakanamanga and N...
Article
Full-text available
Oceanic languages are often described as preferring primary stress on penultimate syllables, but detailed surveys show that many different types of prominence patterns have been reported across and within Oceanic language families. In some cases, these interact with segmental and phonotactic factors, such as syllable weight. The range of Oceanic pr...
Article
Full-text available
(Forthcoming, 2020) Nafsan, an Oceanic language of central Vanuatu, is notable for the complex phonotactic structures it exhibits compared to languages spoken further to the north, and compared to the general preference for CV syllables among Oceanic languages. Various types of heterorganic consonant clusters are found in syllable onsets, and are t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Languages use a variety of means to realise informational structure categories like topicalisation and focus. The interaction between prosody and focus realisation strategies was examined in Nafsan, a Southern Oceanic language of Vanuatu, in a series of tasks that were designed to explore prosodic realisation of informational and contrastive focus...
Chapter
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Published in Zygmunt Vetulani and Patrick Paroubek (eds.) Human language technologies as a challenge for computer science and linguistics — 2019, Poznan: Wydawnictwo Nauka i Innowacje. 185-189. Abstract: Close collaboration between community members and visiting researchers offers mutual benefits, including opportunities for new research insights...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Though Oceanic languages are often described as preferring primary stress on penultimate syllables, many different patterns have been noted across and within language families, and may interact with segmental and phonotactic factors. This is exemplified across linguistically diverse Vanuatu. However, both impressionistic and instrumentally-based de...
Article
This article explores the issues of pronunciation and comprehension in the English as a lingua franca (ELF) context of pilot–air traffic controller radiotelephony communication, and how these are handled in the proficiency rating scale globally used to assess pilots and air traffic controllers engaging in international flight and air traffic contro...
Thesis
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This thesis is an investigation of the sound system of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic (Nilo-Saharan) language traditionally spoken in South Sudan. The primary aim of this study is to develop a phonetically-based description of aspects of Lopit segmental and tonal phonology, with a focus on the Dorik variety of the language. This is first approached via...
Article
Full-text available
There are now significant numbers of children who speak a language other than English when they enter the formal school system in Australia. Many of these children come from a language background that is entirely different from the school language. Many Indigenous children, however, come from creole-speaking backgrounds where their home language ma...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence of Australian English vowel shifting has been found recently, in data primarily from Sydney and surrounding areas. Although regional variation in the Australian accent remains under-investigated, some signs of regional vowel differences have been found, suggesting that data from other regional centres must also be considered to accurately...
Book
Full-text available
Digital methods for recording information are now ubiquitous. In fieldwork-based disciplines, like linguistics, musicology, anthropology and so on, recordings are typically of high cultural value and there is great benefit in the proper curation of these recordings, to the researcher, to the community in which they worked, and to the broader societ...

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