Rosemary G Gillespie

Rosemary G Gillespie
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

About

420
Publications
91,619
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13,608
Citations
Citations since 2016
128 Research Items
7649 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
January 2012 - present
University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
January 2011 - present
Le laboratoire évolution et diversité biologique

Publications

Publications (420)
Article
Full-text available
MacArthur and Wilson's theory of island biogeography has been a foundation for obtaining testable predictions from models of community assembly and for developing models that integrate across scales and disciplines. Historically, however, these developments have focused on integration across ecological and macroevolutionary scales and on predicting...
Article
Current understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes underlying island biodiversity is heavily shaped by empirical data from plants and birds, although arthropods comprise the overwhelming majority of known animal species, and as such can provide key insights into processes governing biodiversity. Novel high throughput sequencing (HTS) ap...
Preprint
Full-text available
Earth systems are nearing a global tipping point, beyond which the dynamics of biological systems will become unstable. One major driver of instability is species invasion, especially by organisms that act as "ecosystem engineers" through their modification of abiotic and biotic factors. In a mosaic landscape of non-invaded and invaded habitat, eco...
Article
Adaptive radiation provides the ideal context for identifying and testing the processes that drive evolutionary diversification. However, different adaptive radiations show a variety of different patterns, making it difficult to come up with universal rules that characterize all such systems. Diversification may occur via several mechanisms includi...
Article
Full-text available
As with many scientific disciplines, arachnology has long been male dominated. This gender bias has been changing gradually over the years, with some prominent early pioneers playing influential roles. Starting with Eliza Staveley in the mid-1800s, women pursued arachnology in a somewhat clandestine manner. The frequency with which women became inv...
Article
Islands make up a large proportion of Earth’s biodiversity, yet are also some of the most sensitive systems to environmental perturbation. Biogeographic theory predicts that geologic age, area, and isolation typically drive islands’ diversity patterns, and thus potentially impact non‐native spread and community homogenization across island systems....
Preprint
Our current understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes underlying island biodiversity is heavily shaped by empirical data from plants and birds, although arthropods comprise the overwhelming majority of known animal species. This is due to inherent problems with obtaining high-quality arthropod data. Novel high throughput sequencing app...
Article
Full-text available
The degree of similarity between the microbiotas of host species often mirrors the phylogenetic proximity of the hosts. This pattern, referred to as phylosymbio- sis, is widespread in animals and plants. While phylosymbiosis was initially interpreted as the signal of symbiotic transmission and coevolution between microbes and their hosts, it is now...
Article
The diversification of a host lineage can be influenced by both the external environment and its assemblage of microbes. Here, we use a young lineage of spiders, distributed along a chronologically arranged series of volcanic mountains, to investigate how their associated microbial communities have changed as the spiders colonized new locations. Us...
Article
Full-text available
Background A striking aspect of evolution is that it often converges on similar trajectories. Evolutionary convergence can occur in deep time or over short time scales, and is associated with the imposition of similar selective pressures. Repeated convergent events provide a framework to infer the genetic basis of adaptive traits. The current study...
Article
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Spatial variation in climatic conditions along elevation gradients provides an important backdrop by which communities assemble and diversify. Lowland habitats tend to be connected through time, whereas highlands can be continuously or periodically isolated, conditions that have been hypothesized to promote high levels of species endemism. This ten...
Article
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Spiders (Araneae) have a diverse spectrum of morphologies, behaviours and physiologies. Attempts to understand the genomic-basis of this diversity are often hindered by their large, heterozygous and AT-rich genomes with high repeat content resulting in highly fragmented, poor-quality assemblies. As a result, the key attributes of spider genomes, in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is rapidly altering ecosystems, driving range shifts, range contractions, dwindling population sizes and local extinctions in many species. Some species, however, are expanding their ranges and seem to benefit from warming temperatures. This is the case for the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi, which has undergone a rang...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity accumulates hierarchically by means of ecological and evolutionary processes and feedbacks. Within ecological communities drift, dispersal, speciation, and selection operate simultaneously to shape patterns of biodiversity. Reconciling the relative importance of these is hindered by current models and inference methods, which tend to f...
Presentation
Full-text available
Preliminary results about the Hawaiian Lycosid phylogeny that I just got one week before the congress. I'm interested in your opinion!
Preprint
Full-text available
Spatial variation in climatic conditions along elevation gradients provides an important backdrop by which communities assemble and diversify. Lowland habitats tend to be connected through time, whereas highlands can be continuously or periodically isolated, conditions that have been hypothesized to promote high levels of species endemism. This ten...
Article
DNA metabarcoding is a popular methodology for biodiversity assessment and increasingly used for community level analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity. The evolutionary history of hundreds of specimens can be captured in a single collection vial. However, the method is not without pitfalls, which may inflate or misrepresent recovered diversit...
Chapter
Islands have inspired biologists for hundreds of years as locations that foster unique biotic assemblages and provide insights into ecological and evolutionary processes dictating life globally. Although by classic definition islands are subcontinental land masses surrounded by water, from a biological perspective, islands can be defined broadly as...
Article
Full-text available
Background Argiope bruennichi, the European wasp spider, has been investigated intensively as a focal species for studies on sexual selection, chemical communication, and the dynamics of rapid range expansion at a behavioral and genetic level. However, the lack of a reference genome has limited insights into the genetic basis for these phenomena. T...
Article
Full-text available
Much of our knowledge regarding the role of chemicals in species recognition in arthropods is based on a few taxonomic groups, predominantly insect pest species. To investigate the chemical underpinnings of species recognition cues in other arthropods, we conducted mate choice experiments and analyzed the chemical profiles of two species in the lon...
Article
Since the description in 1900 of the iconic Happy Face spider, Theridion grallator, Simon, along with nine relatives, the Theridion fauna of the Hawaiian Islands has remained unstudied. Here, we present a systematic revision of the Hawaiian Theridion, which includes the examination of abundant material collected during the last 50 years, with scann...
Preprint
Full-text available
The diversification of a host organism can be influenced by both the external environment and its assemblage of microbes. Here, we use a young lineage of spiders, distributed along a chronologically arranged series of volcanic mountains, to determine the evolutionary history of a host and its associated microbial communities, altogether forming the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Argiope bruennichi, the European wasp spider, has been studied intensively as to sexual selection, chemical communication, and the dynamics of rapid range expansion at a behavioral and genetic level. However, the lack of a reference genome has limited insights into the genetic basis for these phenomena. Therefore, we assembled a high-qu...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Studying clearly delineated populations in marine lakes, islands of sea, we investigated the interplay of habitat size, dispersal potential, and priority effects in shaping marine population genetic structure. Location Marine lakes and coastal locations in Indonesia, Palau, Papua New Guinea and Australia. Taxon Mussels (Mytilidae, Brachidonte...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed how assemblages of spiders were structured in small Hawaiian tropical forest fragments (Hawaiian, kipuka ) within a matrix of previous lava flows, over both space (sampling kipuka of different sizes) and time (comparison with a similar study from 1998). Standardized hand-collection by night was carried out in May 2016. In total, 702 spi...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale studies on community ecology are highly desirable but often difficult to accomplish due to the considerable investment of time, labor and, money required to characterize richness, abundance, relatedness, and interactions. Nonetheless, such large-scale perspectives are necessary for understanding the composition, dynamics, and resilience...
Article
Stable core microbial communities have been described in numerous animal species and are commonly associated with fitness benefits for their hosts. Recent research, however, highlights examples of species whose microbiota are transient and environmentally derived. Here, we test the effect of diet on gut microbial community assembly in the spider Ba...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biodiversity accumulates hierarchically by means of ecological and evolutionary processes and feedbacks. Reconciling the relative importance of these processes is hindered by current theory, which tends to focus on a single spatial, temporal or taxonomic scale. We introduce a mechanistic model of community assembly, rooted in classic island biogeog...
Article
Full-text available
Natural history museums are unique spaces for interdisciplinary research and educational innovation. Through extensive exhibits and public programming and by hosting rich communities of amateurs, students, and researchers at all stages of their careers, they can provide a place-based window to focus on integration of science and discovery, as well...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive radiation plays a fundamental role in our understanding of the evolutionary process. However, the concept has provoked strong and differing opinions concerning its definition and nature among researchers studying a wide diversity of systems. Here, we take a broad view of what constitutes an adaptive radiation, and seek to find commonalitie...
Article
Full-text available
In light of the current biodiversity crisis, molecular barcoding has developed into an irreplaceable tool. Barcoding has been considerably simplified by developments in high throughput sequencing technology, but still can be prohibitively expensive and laborious when community samples of thousands of specimens need to be processed. Here, we outline...
Article
The study of biodiversity started as a single unified field that spanned both ecology and evolution and both macro and micro phenomena. But over the 20th century, major trends drove ecology and evolution apart and pushed an emphasis towards the micro perspective in both disciplines. Macroecology and macroevolution re‐emerged as self‐consciously dis...
Article
Full-text available
High throughput sequencing (HTS) has emerged as a valuable tool for the rapid isolation of genetic markers for population genetics and pedigree analysis. HTS-based SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping protocols like RAD (Restriction-site associated DNA) sequencing or hybrid capture allow for the isolation of thousands of markers from any...
Article
The interactions between insects and their plant host have been implicated in driving diversification of both players. Early arguments highlighted the role of ecological opportunity, with the idea that insects “escape and radiate” on new hosts, with subsequent hypotheses focusing on the interplay between host shifting and host tracking, coupled wit...
Article
Over the last decade, the Integrated Digitized Biocollections (iDigBio) organization and the Advancing the Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) grant program, both funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), have made large strides in the aggregation of pre-existing siloed digital collections data as well as the new digitization...
Article
1.Adaptive radiations are typically characterized by niche partitioning among their constituent species. Trophic niche partitioning is particularly important in predatory animals, which rely on limited food resources for survival. 2.We test for trophic niche partitioning in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian Tetragnatha spiders, which have diversifi...
Article
Full-text available
New genetic diagnostic approaches have greatly aided efforts to document global biodiversity and improve biosecurity. This is especially true for organismal groups in which species diversity has been underestimated historically due to difficulties associated with sampling, the lack of clear morphological characteristics, and/or limited availability...
Preprint
Full-text available
Natural history museums are unique spaces for interdisciplinary research and for educational innovation. Through extensive exhibits and public programming and by hosting rich communities of amateurs, students, and researchers at all stages of their careers, they provide a place-based window to focus on integration of science and discovery, as well...
Preprint
Full-text available
Natural history museums are unique spaces for interdisciplinary research and for educational innovation. Through extensive exhibits and public programming and by hosting rich communities of amateurs, students, and researchers at all stages of their careers, they provide a place-based window to focus on integration of science and discovery, as well...
Article
Full-text available
Species interactions are responsible for many key mechanisms that govern the dynamics of ecological communities. Variation in the way interactions are organized among species results in different network structures, which translates into a community's ability to resist collapse and change. To better understand the factors involved in dictating ongo...
Article
Full-text available
The role of the environmental niche in fostering ecological divergence during adaptive radiation remains enigmatic. In this study, we examine the interplay between environmental niche divergence and conservatism in the context of adaptive radiation on oceanic islands, by characterizing the niche breadth of four Hawaiian arthropod radiations: Tetrag...
Article
Food webs form the basis of biological communities, though empirical research has been hindered by difficulties in quantifying interactions. Metabarcoding from predator gut content extractions with universal primers promises to provide simple and rapid insights into food web interactions. However, the highly overabundant predator DNA often complete...
Article
Full-text available
Background In light of the current biodiversity crisis, DNA barcoding is developing into an essential tool to quantify state shifts in global ecosystems. Current barcoding protocols often rely on short amplicon sequences, which yield accurate identification of biological entities in a community, but provide limited phylogenetic resolution across br...
Presentation
Full-text available
Wolf spiders remain unknown in the Hawaiian archipelago although their pattern of diversity might help us to understand the interplay between ecology and evolution. I present here the primarily results about their phylogeny and the insight it brings into their diversification pattern
Article
Full-text available
Aim As a continental island, much of the biota of New Zealand was initially thought to have been shaped by vicariance. Recent studies, however, have highlighted the role of dispersal, with some even suggesting that the entire biota is the product of dispersal events following emergence of the islands. This study focuses on the interplay between dis...
Chapter
Full-text available
Evolutionary biogeography lies at the intersection between two sets of highly dynamic processes. One set dictates the physical environment, in which changes in size, isolation, and overall suitability for supporting life, tend to occur in cycles of different frequencies. The second set of processes shapes the ecological and evolutionary trajectorie...
Article
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most widely studied patterns in ecology, yet no consensus has been reached about its underlying causes. We argue that the reasons for this are the verbal nature of existing hypotheses, the failure to mechanistically link interacting ecological and evolutionary processes to the LDG, and the fact...
Article
Full-text available
Islands harbour evolutionary and ecologically unique biota, which are currently disproportionately threatened by a multitude of anthropogenic factors, including habitat loss, invasive species and climate change. Native forests on oceanic islands are important refugia for endemic species, many of which are rare and highly threatened. Long-term monit...
Article
1.The simplicity and cost efficiency of Illumina amplicon sequencing has greatly contributed to the advancement of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding applications. However, current amplicon sequencing based barcoding approaches are usually restricted to short, single‐locus fragments, limiting their taxonomic and phylogenetic resolution. 2.Here, we est...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: In light of the current biodiversity crisis, DNA barcoding is developing into an essential tool to quantify state shifts in global ecosystems. Current barcoding protocols often rely on short amplicon sequences, which yield accurate identification of biological entities in a community, but provide limited phylogenetic resolution across b...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The processes through which populations originate and diversify ecologically in the initial stages of adaptive radiation are little understood because we lack information on critical steps of early divergence. A key question is, at what point do closely related species interact, setting the stage for competition and ecological specializ...