Rosemarie E. Perry

Rosemarie E. Perry
New York University | NYU · Department of Applied Psychology

Ph.D.

About

25
Publications
4,787
Reads
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622
Citations
Introduction
Rosemarie Perry works in the Department of Applied Psychology at New York University, where she specializes in translational developmental psychobiology using a cross-species approach. More specifically, her work integrates human research with a rodent model of “scarcity-adversity” to assess the impact of poverty on the neurobehavioral development of emotionality, social skills, and cognition.
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - present
New York University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2010 - December 2015
NYU Langone Medical Center
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2010 - December 2016
Nathan Kline Institute
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: A major component of perception is hedonic valence: perceiving stimuli as pleasant or unpleasant. Here, we used early olfactory experiences that shape odor preferences and aversions to explore developmental plasticity in circuits mediating odor hedonics. We used 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic mapping of neural activity to identify cir...
Article
Full-text available
Childhood maltreatment is associated with adverse brain development and later life psychiatric disorders, with maltreatment from the caregiver inducing a particular vulnerability to later life psychopathologies. Here we review two complementary rodent models of early life abuse, which are used to examine the infant response to trauma within attachm...
Article
Full-text available
Social support can attenuate the behavioral and stress hormone response to threat, a phenomenon called social buffering. The mother’s social buffering of the infant is one of the more robust examples, yet we understand little about the neurobiology. Using a rodent model, we explore the neurobiology of social buffering by assessing neural processing...
Article
Full-text available
Social buffering, which is the attenuation of stress hormone release by a social partner, occurs in many species throughout the lifespan. Social buffering of the infant by the caregiver is particularly robust, and animal models using infant rodents are uncovering the mechanisms and neural circuitry supporting social buffering. At birth, the hypotha...
Article
Full-text available
Caregiver-associated cues, including those learned in abusive attachment, provide a sense of safety and security to the child. Here, we explore how cues associated with abusive attachment, such as maternal odor, can modify the enduring neurobehavioral effects of early-life abuse. Two early-life abuse models were used: a naturalistic paradigm, where...
Article
One pathway by which environments of socioeconomic risk are thought to affect cognitive development is through stress physiology. The biological systems underpinning stress and attention undergo a sensitive period of development during infancy. Psychobiological theory emphasizes a dynamic pattern of context-dependent development, however, research...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a shift in the study of childhood adversity towards a focus on dimensions of adversity as opposed to a focus on cumulative risk or specific adversities. The Dimensional Model of Adversity and Psychopathology (DMAP) proposes deprivation and threat as core dimensions of childhood adversity. Previous work using DMAP has found links betw...
Article
Environmental adversity increases child susceptibility to disrupted developmental outcomes, but the mechanisms by which adversity can shape development remain unclear. A translational cross-species approach was used to examine stress-mediated pathways by which poverty-related adversity can influence infant social development. Findings from a longit...
Article
We examined interactions between baseline hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity in relation to executive functions (EF) in a sample (n = 1,005) of children in low wealth, nonurban communities at age 48 months. Salivary cortisol and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) represented baseline HPA axis...
Article
Using data from a large longitudinal sample (N = 1,292) of children and their caregivers in predominantly low-income, nonurban communities, we investigated longitudinal relations between attuned caregiving in infancy, joint attention in toddlerhood, and executive functions in early childhood. The results from path analysis demonstrated that attuned...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been theorized that humans develop higher mental functions, such as executive functions (EFs), within the context of interpersonal interactions and social relationships. Various components of social interactions, such as interpersonal communication, perspective taking, and conforming/adhering to social rules, may create important (and p...
Article
Using data from a large international sample (N = 385) of first-time expectant parents, the current analysis investigated whether parents demonstrated diurnal cortisol linkage in late pregnancy and whether self-reported psychological stress moderated this linkage. At approximately 36 weeks gestation, mothers and fathers collected saliva samples in...
Article
Full-text available
It is well-established that children from low-income, under-resourced families are at increased risk of altered social development. However, the biological mechanisms by which poverty-related adversities can "get under the skin" to influence social behavior are poorly understood and cannot be easily ascertained using human research alone. This stud...
Article
Full-text available
Relations between maternal baseline cortisol and infant cortisol reactivity to an emotion induction procedure at child ages 7, 15, and 24 months were analyzed using data from the Family Life Project (N = 1,292). The emotion induction consisted of a series of standardized and validated tasks, including an arm restraint, toy removal, and mask present...
Chapter
Full-text available
Executive functions (EFs) are higher-order cognitive abilities, including working memory, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility, that help individuals plan, think abstractly, organize, set goals, and act intentionally. Recent scientific advances suggest that EFs are important for lifelong success and overall health. Drawing evidence from both human...
Article
Full-text available
The association of socioeconomic status with academic readiness and school achievement is well established. However, the specific contributions of cognitive and social aspects of self-regulation, and potential reciprocal relations between them in the prediction of school readiness and early school achievement have not previously been examined. This...
Article
Full-text available
Children reared in impoverished environments are at risk for enduring psychological and physical health problems. Mechanisms by which poverty affects development, however, remain unclear. To explore one potential mechanism of poverty's impact on social–emotional and cognitive development, an experimental examination of a rodent model of scarcity-ad...
Article
Full-text available
When animals and their offspring are threatened, parents switch from self-defense to offspring protection. How self-defense is suppressed remains elusive. We postulated that suppression of the self-defense response, freezing, is gated via oxytocin acting in the centro-lateral amygdala (CeL). We found that rat dams conditioned to fear an odor, froze...
Article
Full-text available
We review recent findings related to the neurobiology of infant attachment, emphasizing the role of parenting quality in attachment formation and emotional development. Current findings suggest that the development of brain structures important for emotional expression and regulation (amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus) is deeply associated w...
Article
Full-text available
The updating of a memory is triggered whenever it is reactivated and a mismatch from what is expected (i.e., prediction error) is detected, a process that can be unraveled through the memory’s sensitivity to protein synthesis inhibitors (i.e., reconsolidation). As noted in previous studies, in Pavlovian threat/aversive conditioning in adult rats, p...
Article
Attachment to an abusive caregiver has wide phylogenetic representation, suggesting that animal models are useful in understanding the neural basis underlying this phenomenon and subsequent behavioral outcomes. We previously developed a rat model, in which we use classical conditioning to parallel learning processes evoked during secure attachment...
Article
Early life infant-caregiver attachment is a dynamic, bidirectional process that involving both the infant and caregiver. Infant attachment appears to have a dual function. First, it ensures the infant remains close to the caregiver in order to receive necessary care for survival. Second, the quality of attachment and its associated sensory stimuli...

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