Rosalyn Denise Campbell

Rosalyn Denise Campbell
University of Georgia | UGA · School of Social Work

PhD LMSW

About

21
Publications
1,636
Reads
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363
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Campbell is currently on sabbatical after departing from her position as an Associate Professor in the University of Georgia's School of Social Work.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - May 2022
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2012 - August 2020
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2012 - July 2012
Dartmouth College
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2004 - April 2012
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Social Work/Sociology
August 1997 - May 2001
University of Texas at Austin
Field of study
  • Sociology; Ethnic Studies

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Objectives This study explored community leaders’ understanding of depression among older Korean Americans and barriers to seeking mental health services. Depression is prevalent among older Korean Americans, but they are less likely to seek help from professionals and prefer to use informal methods. Older Korean Americans strongly prefer to mainta...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 has significantly impacted a substantial number of Black Americans. Black women, in particular, are facing challenges financially, physically, and mentally during this unprecedented time. Between serving as frontline workers, being concerned about contracting the virus, contributing to their families financially, and worrying about their l...
Article
Peer support services are an important resource for mental health programs. Despite the growth of peer support services in the United States, there is little knowledge on the characteristics of peer support providers and their experiences. In this study, we surveyed a group of certified peer specialists about service provision, job satisfaction, so...
Article
Purpose: In determining whether peer support interventions are effective, an examination of the measures used to assess outcomes is essential. Prior reviews often do not account for validly and reliability of measures used in studies, which may lead to conflicting conclusions. Method: Explicit criteria to identify articles of psychosocial based ou...
Article
African Americans have historically turned to the Black Church in times of trouble and/or need, including when experiencing mental health problems as they often seen as having spiritual causes. The purpose of this study was to better understand what church members believe to be the Black church’s role in addressing mental health issues. Surveys wer...
Article
Little is known about the illness, help-seeking, and service-use experiences of Black/African American men with depression. This study presents and explores the narratives of four Black men with depression to both highlight the voice of Black/African American men in mental health research and better understand how Black/African American men underst...
Article
Disclosure is often used as a teaching tool in a variety of learning and teaching contexts, settings, and disciplines. This paper shares one instructor's view on disclosure in teaching clinical social work practice courses. It discusses how disclosure is used in the classroom and explains why the instructor sees it as a valuable education tool.
Article
The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between “The Black Church”, the mental health needs of its members, and addressing those needs from the perspective of counsellors within the church. Four in-depth interviews were conducted with members of the mental health counselling team at one large, African American-serving church in the M...
Article
Full-text available
p>Research consistently shows that Black Americans’ symptoms of depression are more severe and persistent than their white counterparts yet they seek out and/or use services at a far lower rate. While trying to understand this disparity, it is important that researchers explore the socio-cultural and historical context around Black Americans’ exper...
Article
Research on racial/ethnic differences in quitting mental health services has yet to examine the multiple forms of services offered and reasons why racial/ethnic groups quit. Data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) examined whether race/ethnicity was related to quitting nine types of mental health services within a multiv...
Article
While stigma is a large barrier for all racial/ethnic groups, research suggests that stigma has a particularly strong impact on the help-seeking behaviors and service use patterns of Black Americans. In this qualitative study, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 Black American men and women, ages 21 to 57, who have experienc...
Article
Culturally shaped notions of health and illness have a strong impact on how individuals engage in help seeking and how they view service use when they are ill. The current study was designed to look more closely at the impact of culture, specifically cultural beliefs, on help seeking and service use for depression among black Americans. Through qua...
Article
Evidence suggests that people with a severe mental illness still suffer high levels of stigma and discrimination. However little is known about how people with a severe mental illness manage such stigma. As such, the overall aim of this study is to document and analyze behavioral and psychological strategies of stigma management and control in a sa...
Conference Paper
Purpose: Depression is a major mood disorder affecting up to 8% of the U.S population. Evidence suggests that prognosis and recovery rates for this disorder are very good, given the right treatments and supports. However many do not engage with mental health services. This is especially the case for minorities such as Black Americans, who have the...
Article
From in-depth qualitative interviews with 17 African American men and women between the ages of 21 and 57, this dissertation examines how socio-cultural factors impact help-seeking and service use among Black Americans with depression. This dissertation accomplishes three main objectives: 1) better understand low service use rates for depression am...
Article
The central aim of this study is to estimate prevalence, ages of onset, severity, and associated disability of anxiety disorders among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. Results indicated that whites were at elevated risk for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety compared to Caribbean...

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