Rosa Maria Van der Ven

Rosa Maria Van der Ven
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Marine Animal Ecology

PhD in Sciences

About

10
Publications
5,285
Reads
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115
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
107 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Additional affiliations
December 2020 - present
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2019 - present
University of Essex
Position
  • Lecturer
March 2011 - February 2019
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • courses in the Bachelor: e.g. Human and Animal Physiology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Ecology of Invertebrates, Ecological fieldwork, as wel as Master e.g. Conservation Biology and Excursion Marine and Lacustrine Science and Management.
Education
October 2009 - April 2010
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Field of study
  • Research internship at Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
September 2007 - June 2010
Wageningen University & Research
Field of study
  • Marine Biology - minor in Fisheries and Marine Resource Management.
September 2003 - June 2007
Wageningen University & Research
Field of study
  • Biology - specialisation in Animal Biology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Countries in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) and along the Red Sea are particularly vulnerable to coral reef degradation, and understanding the degree of connectivity among coral reefs is a first step toward efficient conservation. The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic diversity, population structure and connectivity patterns of the br...
Chapter
Ecological and social processes of the Spermonde Archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been intensively studied during the Science for the Protection of Indonesian Coastal Ecosystems (SPICE) program. The archipelago is of specific interest to better understand how intensive exploitation of marine resources results in the degradation of reef...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of population structure and gene flow allow exploring the historical and contemporary processes that determine a species’ biogeographic pattern. In mangroves, large-scale genetic studies to estimate gene flow have been conducted predominantly in the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic region. Here we examine the genetic diversity and connectivity o...
Article
Full-text available
The Coral Triangle region contains the world’s highest marine biodiversity, however, these reefs are also the most threatened by global and local threats. A main limitation that prevents the implementation of adequate conservation measures is that connectivity and genetic structure of populations is poorly known. The aim of this study was to invest...
Article
Coral reefs provide essential goods and services but are degrading at an alarming rate due to local and global anthropogenic stressors. The main limitation that prevents the implementation of adequate conservation measures is that connectivity and genetic structure of populations are poorly known. Here, the genetic diversity and connectivity of the...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the genetic composition and dynamics of mangrove species along a latitudinal range could provide insight as to how their biogeographical range evolved. In this study, we investigate the genetic composition of the widespread mangrove species Avicennia marina in its core region and southern range limit along the East African coast to te...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The aim of this study is to determine the genetic diversity, population structure, and connectivity of the broadcast-spawning coral Acropora tenuis (Cnidaria; Scleractinia; Acroporidae). Based on the long pelagic larval duration (PLD) of the species, long distance dispersal resulting in high connectivity among populations is hypothesized. Loc...
Article
Full-text available
Light is one of the most important abiotic factors influencing the (skeletal) growth of scleractinian corals. Light stimulates coral growth by the process of light-enhanced calcification, which is mediated by zooxanthellar photosynthesis. However, the quantity of light that is available for daily coral growth is not only determined by light intensi...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Development of scientific diving standards and training capacities in the Netherlands.