Rosa Ana González-Polo

Rosa Ana González-Polo
Universidad de Extremadura | UNEX · Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Genetics

PhD

About

86
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12,154
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Publications

Publications (86)
Article
Full-text available
Phenolic compounds derived from olive oil have beneficial health properties against cancer, neurodegenerative, and metabolic diseases. Therefore, there are discrepancies in their impact on mitochondrial function that result in changes in oxidative capacity, mitochondrial respiration, and energetic demands. This review focuses on the versatile role...
Article
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KEAP1 is a cytoplasmic protein that functions as an adaptor for the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase system, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including NFE2L2/NRF2 and p62/SQSTM1. Loss of KEAP1 leads to an accumulation of protein ubiquitin aggregates and defective autophagy. To better understand the role of KEAP1 in the degradati...
Article
Full-text available
Autophagy is a conserved intracellular catabolic pathway that removes cytoplasmic components to contribute to neuronal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence has increasingly shown that the induction of autophagy improves neuronal health and extends longevity in several animal models. Therefore, there is a great interest in the identification of effect...
Article
Full-text available
Autophagy is a mechanism responsible for the degradation of cellular components to maintain their homeostasis. However, autophagy is commonly altered and compromised in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be considered a multifactorial disease because environmental factors, genetic factors, and agin...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Preprint
Full-text available
In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Preprint
Full-text available
the PDF can be download freely on pubmed. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33634751/
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Article
Full-text available
The research of new biomarkers for Parkinson's disease is essential for accurate and precocious diagnosis, as well as for the discovery of new potential disease mechanisms and drug targets. The main objective of this work was to identify metabolic changes that might serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of this neurodegenerative disorder. For this,...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. This neuronal loss, inherent to age, is related to exposure to environmental toxins and/or a genetic predisposition. PD-induced cell death has been studied thoroughly, but its characterization rem...
Article
Efavirenz (EFV), a first generation non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor widely employed in combination antiretroviral therapy regimens over the last 20 years, has been associated with a wide range of neuropsychiatric effects and has also been linked with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). EFV has been reported to alt...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. While most PD cases are idiopathic, the known genetic causes of PD are useful to understand common disease mechanisms. Recent data suggests that autophagy is regulated by protein acetylation mediated by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) ac...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder. The pathogenesis of this disease is associated with gene and environmental factors. Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most frequent genetic cause of familial and sporadic PD. Moreover, posttranslational modifications, including protein acetylation, are...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondria form close physical contacts with a specialized domain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), known as the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM). This association constitutes a key signaling hub to regulate several fundamental cellular processes. Alterations in ER–mitochondria signaling have pleiotropic effects on a variety of intracellul...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are structures that regulate physiological functions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to maintain calcium signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several proteins located in MAMs, including those encoded by PARK genes and some of neurodegeneration-related proteins (huntingtin, pre...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Heterozygous mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase-1, increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the N370S-GBA1 mutation on cellular homeostasis and vulnerability in a patient-spe...
Article
Full-text available
To maintain intercellular homeostasis, cells must constantly adapt their metabolism in response to different stimuli (e.g., cellular energy status, stress, growth, and death). Therefore, almost all cell types possess 2 types of degradative pathways: autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The term "autophagy" comes from the Greek words...
Chapter
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and later neuronal death. Several genetics and environmental factors have been implicated in the PD pathogenesis. Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (_LRRK2_) are a major cause of familial parkinsonism, and the G2019S mutati...
Chapter
Macroautophagy (usually referred to as autophagy) is the most important degradation system in mammalian cells. It is responsible for the elimination of protein aggregates, organelles, and other cellular content. During autophagy, these materials (i.e., cargo) must be engulfed by a double-membrane structure called an autophagosome, which delivers th...
Chapter
Autophagy is the major cellular process of degradation and is modulated by several signaling pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) class III (Vps34) and PtdIns3K class I regulate the autophagy pathway positively and negatively, respectively. Both classes of PtdIns3K participate in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdI...
Chapter
Autophagy can be defined as a catabolic process that maintains cellular homeostasis by the degradation of damaged or excess cellular organelles and protein aggregates from the cytoplasm, thereby enabling cell survival. Cell culture and in vivo studies have revealed the importance of autophagy in numerous diseases, including cancer, aging, neurodege...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized pathologically by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The etiology of PD is still unknown, involving genetic and environmental factors; however mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in PD pathogenesis. In this regard...
Article
Full-text available
We characterized the dynamics of autophagy in vitro using four different cell systems and analyzing markers widely used in this field, i.e. LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3; protein recruited from the cytosol (LC3-I) to the autophagosomal membrane where it is lipidated (LC3-II)) and p62/SQSTM1 (adaptor protein that serves as a li...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring au...
Article
Most laboratories interested in autophagy use different imaging software for managing and analyzing heterogeneous parameters in immunofluorescence experiments (e.g., LC3-puncta quantification and determination of the number and size of lysosomes). One solution would be software that works on a user's laptop or workstation that can access all image...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with poorly understood etiology. However, growing evidence suggests that compromised maintenance of mitochondrial function in an age-dependent manner is a key risk factor. Several proteins, codified by PD-related genes, are associated with mitochondria, including PTEN-inducedputative kinase 1...
Article
The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases involves altered activity of proteolytic systems and accumulation of protein aggregates. Autophagy is an intracellular process in which damaged organelles and long-lived proteins are degraded and recycled for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis. Disruption of autophagic activity in neurons leads to...
Article
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a dysregulation of cellular degradation system. An accumulation of misfolded proteins has been founded in the brains of parkinsonian patients, causing neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and leading to a progressive neurodegeneration. Autophagy plays an important role in...
Article
Pompe disease or glycogen storage disease type II (OMIM: 232300) is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a partial or total lack of acid alphaglucosidase, which may produce muscle weakness, gait abnormalities, or even death by respiratory failure. In the last decade, autophagy has been proposed as a mechanism involved in the severity of symp...
Chapter
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently regarded as the most common degenerative disorder of the aging brain after Alzheimer’s dementia. Much progress has been made in identifying the genes involved in familial, or inherited, PD. However, the majority of cases are sporadic (not inherited) and their origin(s) still remain largely undetermined. The env...
Data
Full-text available
Research in autophagy continues to accelerate,(1) and as a result many new scientists are entering the field. Accordingly, it is important to establish a standard set of criteria for monitoring macroautophagy in different organisms. Recent reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose.(2,3) There are many useful an...
Article
Full-text available
Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mit...
Article
Full-text available
The link between the deregulation of autophagy and cell death processes can be essential in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD). However, the molecular mechanism of deregulation of this degradative process in PD patients is unknown. The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is related to PD and...
Article
PD (Parkinson's disease) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra. The implication of genetic factors in the aetiology of PD has an essential importance in our understanding of the development of the disease. Mutations in the LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) gene cause late-onset PD wit...
Article
Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein. Although the precise mechanism by which neuronal degeneration occurs is still unclear, several elements are important to its development: (1) altered gene expression and protein synthesis, (2) mitochondrial damage and (3) impr...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the...
Article
Full-text available
Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a major cause of familial Parkinsonism, and the G2019S mutation of LRRK2 is one of the most prevalent mutations. The deregulation of autophagic processes in nerve cells is thought to be a possible cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we observed that G2019S mutant fibroblasts exhibi...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring au...
Article
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a disorder characterized by a progressive degeneration of midbrain neurons in the substantia nigra and by the presence of cytoplasmic protein inclusions. Therefore, the pathogenesis of this disease has been linked to dysfunctions of cellular degradation. The etiology of this disease is unknown, although it seems clear th...
Article
Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide known to elicit neurotoxicity via an interaction with ionotropic receptors, namely GABA and glutamate receptors. Recently, we showed that fipronil and other phenylpyrazole compounds trigger cell death in Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the mode of action and the type of cell death induced by fip...
Article
Talipexole is a non-ergot dopamine (DA) agonist that has been used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we examined the effect of talipexole on paraquat (PQ)-induced N27 cell death and the intracellular pathways involved in this effect. Pretreatment of N27 cells with talipexole (1mM) resulted in significant protection agai...
Article
Full-text available
Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various types of stress, including, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress-induced ASK1 activation could play an important role both in neuronal apoptosis and an autophagic response in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. The mechanis...
Article
Full-text available
The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not completely defined, although environmental factors (for example, exposure to the herbicide paraquat [PQ]) and genetic susceptibility (such as DJ-1 mutations that have been associated with an autosomal-recessive form of early-onset PD) have been demonstrated to contribute. Alterations in macroautophagy...
Article
LRRK2 mutations have been described as a common cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients from northern Spain. Here we investigated the prevalence of these mutations in a cohort of Spanish PD patients (n = 96) from Extremadura, a region in southwestern Spain. To evaluate the rate of the G2019S and R1441G/C/H LRKK2 mutations in PD patients and h...
Article
When neural cells are exposed to paraquat, nitric oxide generation increases primarily due to an increase in the expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase. The nitric oxide generated has controversial actions in paraquat exposure, as both protective and harmful effects have been described previously. While the actions mediated by...
Article
Although oxidative stress is fundamental to the etiopathology of Parkinson disease, the signaling molecules involved in transduction after oxidant exposure to cell death are ill-defined, thus making it difficult to identify molecular targets of therapeutic relevance. We have addressed this question in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells...
Article
Curcumin, the active compound of the rhizome of Curcuma longa has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. This agent has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, protein kinases, adhesion molecules, redox status and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. While curcumin has been identified as...
Article
Turmeric (curry powder), an essential ingredient of culinary preparations of Southeast Asia, contains a major polyphenolic compound known as curcumin or diferuloylmethane. Curcumin is a widely studied phytochemical with a variety of biological activities. In addition to its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial/antiviral properties, curcumin is consi...
Article
The precise mechanism underlying the role of nitric oxide (NO) or nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) in paraquat-mediated toxicity is yet to be fully elucidated. The importance of the NADPH-diaphorase activity of NOSs in paraquat toxicity, in addition to the production of NO, has previously been reported as a mechanism of toxicity. However, other studie...
Article
Full-text available
J. Neurochem. (2009) 109, 889–898. The role of autophagy as a survival strategy of cells constitutes an emerging topic in the study of the pathogenesis of several diseases with autophagic changes being described in a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although the etiology of PD is still unknown,...
Article
Full-text available
Paraquat (PQ) (1,1-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a widely used herbicide, has been suggested as a potential etiologic factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this sense, understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying PQ-induced toxicity to neural cells is important for optimal use as well as for the development of...
Article
Full-text available
Paraquat (PQ) (1, 1'-dimethyl-4, 4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a widely used herbicide, has been suggested as a potential etiologic factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). In neurons from patients with PD display characteristics of autophagy, a degradative mechanism involved in the recycling and turnover of cytoplasmic constituents f...
Article
Full-text available
Autophagy is a degradative mechanism involved in the recycling and turnover of cytoplasmic constituents from eukaryotic cells. This phenomenon of autophagy has been observed in neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting a functional role for autophagy in neuronal cell death. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that expo...
Article
Paraquat is a herbicide with a potential risk to induce parkinsonism due to its demonstrated neurotoxicity and its strong structural similarity to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), a well-known neurotoxin which causes a clinical syndrome similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). However, at present very little is known about the signaling pathways a...