Roos Pot-Kolder

Roos Pot-Kolder
Orygen The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental health · Orygen Digital

PhD (cum laude) VU University.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow at The University of Melbourne working on 'Virtual Reality for youth mental health'.

About

26
Publications
11,545
Reads
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462
Citations
Introduction
On february 19th 2021 Roos Pot-Kolder obtained her PhD (Cum laude) degree at VU University on her thesis ""Virtual reality for mechanisms and treatment of psychosis". Roos does research in Clinical Psychology and Behavioural Science and also works in clinical practise as a Psychologist. She is a Research Fellow at The University of Melbourne. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/roos-pot-kolder-1415981a/
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - March 2022
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Research fellow - PostDoc
Description
  • Virtual Reality for youth mental health
September 2020 - August 2021
University of Twente
Position
  • Lecturer - PostDoc
January 2013 - February 2021
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • PhD candidate on ' Virtual Reality for research and treatment of Psychosis'

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive impairments in psychosis negatively impact functional recovery and quality of life. Existing interventions for improving cognitive impairment in recent-onset psychosis show inconsistent treatment efficacy, small effects, suboptimal engagement and limited generalizability to daily life functioning. In this perspective we explore how digita...
Article
Full-text available
Background Seventy per cent of patients with psychotic disorders has paranoid delusions. Paranoid delusions are associated with significant distress, hospital admission and social isolation. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) is the primary psychological treatment, but the median effect size is only small to medium. Virtual reality...
Book
Full-text available
This thesis reports on two clinical research studies. The first study researched mechanisms of paranoid ideation, including the ecological validity of virtual reality social environments for eliciting paranoid ideations and behavior, and safety of use concerning cybersickness (chapter 2-4). The second study was a randomized controlled trial examini...
Article
Full-text available
(119 words) Immersive Virtual reality (VR) has been identified as a potentially revolutionary tool for psychological interventions. This study reviews current advances in immersive VR-based therapies for mental disorders. VR has the potential to make psychiatric treatments better, more cost-effective, and to make them available to a larger group of...
Article
Full-text available
Background Negative affective processes may contribute to maintenance of paranoia in patients with psychosis, and vice versa. Successful treatment may break these pathological symptom networks. This study examined whether treatment with virtual reality based cognitive behavioral therapy (VR-CBT) for paranoia influences momentary affective states, a...
Poster
Full-text available
Background Recently, the efficacy of a novel virtual reality based cognitive behavior therapy (VR-CBT) for paranoia was demonstrated. Evidence is growing that the maintenance of psychosis may be influenced by affective processes. This study examined how treatment with VR-CBT influenced positive and negative affect states, and whether the interplay...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Evidence was found for the effectiveness of virtual reality-based cognitive behavioral therapy (VR-CBT) for treating paranoia in psychosis, but health-economic evaluations are lacking. Objective: This study aimed to determine the short-term cost-effectiveness of VR-CBT. Methods: The health-economic evaluation was embedded in a rand...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Evidence was found for the effectiveness of virtual reality-based cognitive behavioral therapy (VR-CBT) for treating paranoia in psychosis, but health-economic evaluations are lacking. OBJECTIVE This study aimed to determine the short-term cost-effectiveness of VR-CBT. METHODS The health-economic evaluation was embedded in a randomized...
Chapter
In the early years of virtual reality in mental healthcare several reviews were published (Gregg and Tarrier 2007; G. Riva 2002; 2003; 2005). None of them mentions work done on virtual reality with psychotic disorders yet, though some early work was starting to get published around the same time. There are different psychotic disorders with each th...
Article
Full-text available
Psychosis is a multifactorial condition arising from an interaction between genetic liability and exposure to environmental risk factors, in particular childhood trauma. Furthermore, accumulating evidence supports a role for the immune system in the aetiology of psychosis. Increased peripheral levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced neurot...
Article
Background: Higher liability to psychosis is associated with low self-esteem and increased sensitivity to social stress. Recently, we reported a positive relation between liability to psychosis and affective and psychotic responses to social stress. This study investigated how self-esteem moderates paranoia, peak subjective distress and stress rea...
Poster
Full-text available
Background Recently, the efficacy of a novel virtual reality based cognitive behavior therapy (VR-CBT) for paranoia was demonstrated. Cognitive biases, cognitive limitations, negative schematic beliefs and safety behavior have been associated with paranoid ideations and delusions. It is unknown whether VR-CBT affects these associated factors, and h...
Article
Summary Background Many patients with psychotic disorders have persistent paranoid ideation and avoid social situations because of suspiciousness and anxiety. We investigated the effects of virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy (VR-CBT) on paranoid thoughts and social participation. Methods In this randomised controlled trial at seve...
Article
The use of virtual reality (VR) in psychological treatment is expected to increase. Cybersickness (CS) is a negative side effect of VR exposure and is associated with treatment dropout. This study aimed to investigate the following: (a) if gender differences in CS can be replicated, (b) if differences in anxiety and CS symptoms between patients and...
Article
Background: Psychotic disorders are characterized by a deranged immune system, including altered number and function of Natural Killer (NK) and T cells. Psychotic disorders arise from an interaction between genetic vulnerability and exposure to environmental risk factors. Exposure to social adversity during early life is particularly relevant to p...
Article
Introduction: Cognitive biases are associated with psychosis liability and paranoid ideation. This study investigated the moderating relationship between pre-existing self-reported cognitive biases and the occurrence of paranoid ideation in response to different levels of social stress in a virtual reality environment. Methods: This study includ...
Article
Background: Experimentally studying the influence of social environments on mental health and behavior is challenging, as social context is difficult to standardize in laboratory settings. Virtual Reality (VR) enables studying social interaction in terms of interpersonal distance in a more ecologically valid manner. Regulation of interpersonal dis...
Article
Background: Social stressors are associated with an increased risk of psychosis. Stress sensitisation is thought to be an underlying mechanism and may be reflected in an altered autonomic stress response. Using an experimental Virtual Reality design, the autonomic stress response to social stressors was examined in participants with different liab...
Article
Background: Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social stress, in interaction with psychosis liability and lev...
Article
The impact of social environments on mental states is difficult to assess, limiting the understanding of which aspects of the social environment contribute to the onset of psychotic symptoms and how individual characteristics moderate this outcome. This study aimed to test sensitivity to environmental social stress as a mechanism of psychosis using...
Article
Full-text available
Many patients with a psychotic disorder participate poorly in society. When psychotic disorders are in partial remission, feelings of paranoia, delusions of reference, social anxiety and self-stigmatization often remain at diminished severity and may lead to avoidance of places and people. Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) is an evidence-base...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am treating a patient who has both Schizophrenia and OCD, and the symptoms are intertwined. Who has information available on the (CBT) treatment of this combination?
I could find some literature on the prevalence of Schizophrenia with OCD, but nothing about treating these patients.
Thank you for your help!

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
BACKGROUND Nearly everyone has trouble with social situations at times. This can include trouble at school or at work, meeting up with friends, or using public transport. Reasons for this can include feelings of social anxiety, not fully trusting other people, not feeling competent with social skills, or a fear of experiencing anxiety symptoms in front of others. For some young people, this can be really hard to deal with and might lead them to seek help from mental health professionals. Psychological treatment for social difficulties can be incredibly effective, but often relies on young people remembering what they’ve learnt and putting it into practice in their everyday lives. During stressful situations, it can be overwhelming and easy to forget these skills, so the gap between therapy settings and everyday life can be barrier in treatment. Revive is a new study at Orygen Digital, where we’ll be exploring how we can use virtual reality (VR) to help support the treatment of young people experiencing social difficulties. VR involves putting on a headset that immerses the user in a 3D virtual environment that looks and feels similar to the real world. We are looking to develop some environments in VR that simulate different social situations young people may find themselves in, offering a safe space for young people to participate in therapy and apply the skills they’ve learnt. We hope Revive will make it easier, safer and more engaging for young people to work on overcoming the social challenges they may face.
Project
Many patients in (partial) remission of a psychotic disorder still avoid social situations because of distrust and anxiety. Our objective is to determine whether social participation improves by virtual reality enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (VRcbt) for paranoid ideation. Data was collected 1 April 2014 - 31 December 2015. We are now analysing & writing up results.