Ronny Lauerwald

Ronny Lauerwald
Université Paris-Saclay · UMR Ecosys

Dr.

About

85
Publications
33,389
Reads
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4,875
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - June 2020
Institut Pierre Simon Laplace
Position
  • Ingénieur de recherche
July 2018 - June 2019
Université Libre de Bruxelles
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2016 - June 2018
University of Exeter
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (85)
Article
Full-text available
In support of the global stocktake of the Paris Agreement on climate change, this study presents a comprehensive framework to process the results of an ensemble of atmospheric inversions in order to make their net ecosystem exchange (NEE) carbon dioxide (CO2) flux suitable for evaluating national greenhouse gas inventories (NGHGIs) submitted by cou...
Article
Full-text available
Leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils into the river network is an important component of the land carbon (C) budget. At regional to global scales, its significance has been estimated through simple mass budgets, often using multi-year averages of observed fluvial DOC fluxes as a proxy of DOC leaching due to the limited availability...
Article
Full-text available
Regional land carbon budgets provide insights into the spatial distribution of the land uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide and can be used to evaluate carbon cycle models and to define baselines for land-based additional mitigation efforts. The scientific community has been involved in providing observation-based estimates of regional carbon budg...
Preprint
Lateral carbon transport from soils to the ocean through rivers has been acknowledged as a key component of global carbon cycle, but is still neglected in most global land surface models (LSMs). Fluvial transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and CO2 has been implemented in the ORCHIDEE LSM, while erosion-induced delivery of sediment and partic...
Article
Full-text available
Northern peatlands store 300–600 Pg C, of which approximately half are underlain by permafrost. Climate warming and, in some regions, soil drying from enhanced evaporation are progressively threatening this large carbon stock. Here, we assess future CO2 and CH4 fluxes from northern peatlands using five land surface models that explicitly include re...
Chapter
With the abundance of observations and advancement in modeling, temperate regions allow for a comprehensive comparison of the data-driven and process-based methods of carbon budget estimation. This chapter presents a review of the latest methodologies for carbon budget and component flux estimation, and the key components in the temperate carbon bu...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gase (GHG) after CO2 and CH4 causing global warming. Among world regions, North America (defined herein as U.S., Canada, and Mexico) is the second largest source of N2O emissions globally, and previous source estimates for this region vary widely. This study aims to p...
Article
Full-text available
The ongoing development of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) global methane (CH4) budget shows a continuation of increasing CH4 emissions and CH4 accumulation in the atmosphere over 2000‐2017. Here we decompose the global budget into 19 regions (18 land and one oceanic) and five key source sectors to spatially attribute the observed global trends. A...
Preprint
Full-text available
In support of the Global Stocktake of the Paris Agreement on Climate change, this study presents a comprehensive framework to process the results of atmospheric inversions in order to make them suitable for evaluating UNFCCC national inventories of land-use carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and removals, corresponding to the Land Use, Land Use Change...
Preprint
Full-text available
Leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to the river network is an important component of the land carbon (C) budget. At regional to global scales, its significance has been estimated through simple mass budgets, often using multi-year averages of observed fluvial DOC fluxes as proxy of DOC leaching due to the limited availability of...
Article
Full-text available
When a peatland is drained and cultivated, it behaves as a notable source of CO 2 . However, we lack temporally and spatially explicit estimates of carbon losses from cultivated peatlands. Using a process-based land surface model that explicitly includes representation of peatland processes, we estimate that northern peatlands converted to cropland...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, together with trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of CH4 and N2O emissions with consistently derived state-of-the-art bottom-up (BU) and top...
Article
Full-text available
p>Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), including that of their trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of estimates for all anthropogenic and...
Article
Full-text available
The availability of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) constrains the ability of ecosystems to use resources such as light, water and carbon. In turn, nutrients impact the distribution of productivity, ecosystem carbon turnovers and their net exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere in response to variation of environmental conditions in both space and tim...
Article
Full-text available
Net primary production (NPP) is the foundation of the oceans’ ecosystems and the fisheries they support. In the Arctic Ocean, NPP is controlled by a complex interplay of light and nutrients supplied by upwelling as well as lateral inflows from adjacent oceans and land. But so far, the role of the input from land by rivers and coastal erosion has no...
Article
Full-text available
As the second largest area of contiguous tropical rainforest and second largest river basin in the world, the Congo Basin has a significant role to play in the global carbon (C) cycle. For the present day, it has been shown that a significant proportion of global terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) is transferred laterally to the land–ocean...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), including that of their trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of estimates for all anthropogenic and na...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, together with trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of CH4 and N2O emissions with consistently derived state-of-the-art bottom-up (BU) and top...
Article
Full-text available
The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to the river network is an overlooked component of the terrestrial soil C budget. Measurements of DOC concentrations in soil, runoff and drainage are scarce and their spatial distribution highly skewed towards industrialized countries. The contribution of terrestrial DOC leaching to the glob...
Article
Full-text available
Global water erosion strongly affects the terrestrial carbon balance. However, this process is currently ignored by most global land surface models (LSMs) that are used to project the responses of terrestrial carbon storage to climate and land use changes. One of the main obstacles to implement erosion processes in LSMs is the high spatial resoluti...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrous oxide (N2O), like carbon dioxide, is a long-lived greenhouse gas that accumulates in the atmosphere. Over the past 150 years, increasing atmospheric N2O concentrations have contributed to stratospheric ozone depletion¹ and climate change², with the current rate of increase estimated at 2 per cent per decade. Existing national inventories do...
Preprint
Full-text available
Regional land carbon budgets provide insights on the spatial distribution of the land uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and can be used to evaluate carbon cycle models and to define baselines for land-based additional mitigation efforts. The scientific community has been involved in providing observation-based estimates of regional carbon budge...
Article
Full-text available
Land-surface models are important tools for simulation of the past, present, and future capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to absorb anthropogenic CO2 emissions. However, fluvial carbon (C) transfers are presently neglected in these models. Using the Amazon basin as a case study, we show that this negligence leads to significant underestimation of...
Preprint
Full-text available
The availability of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) constrain the ability of ecosystems to use resources such as light, water and carbon. In turn, nutrients impact the distribution of productivity, ecosystem carbon turnovers and their net exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere in response to variation of environmental conditions both in space and in t...
Article
Full-text available
Resolving regional carbon budgets is critical for informing land-based mitigation policy. For nine regions covering nearly the whole globe, we collected inventory estimates of carbon-stock changes complemented by satellite estimates of biomass changes where inventory data are missing. The net land–atmospheric carbon exchange (NEE) was calculated by...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Future land carbon (C) uptake under climate changes and rising atmospheric CO 2 is influenced by nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) constraints. A few existing land surface models (LSMs) account for both N and P dynamics, but lack comprehensive evaluation. This will lead to large uncertainty in estimating the P effect on terrestrial C cycles. With the...
Article
Full-text available
Soil erosion by rainfall and runoff is an important process behind the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) over land, thereby impacting the exchange of carbon (C) between land, atmosphere, and rivers. However, the net role of soil erosion in the global C cycle is still unclear as it involves small-scale SOC removal, transport, and redeposit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. As the second largest area of contiguous tropical rainforest and second largest river basin in the world, the Congo basin has a significant role to play in the global carbon (C) cycle. Inventories suggest that terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) and C storage in tree biomass has increased in recent decades in intact forests of trop...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Carbon Budget 2018 (GCB2018) estimated by the atmospheric CO 2 growth rate, fossil fuel emissions, and modeled (bottom-up) land and ocean fluxes cannot be fully closed, leading to a "budget imbalance," highlighting uncertainties in GCB components. However, no systematic analysis has been performed on which regions or processes contribute...
Article
Full-text available
Natural lakes and reservoirs are important yet not well‐constrained sources of greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. In particular for N2O emissions, a huge variability is observed in the few, observation‐driven flux estimates that have been published so far. Recently, a process‐based, spatially explicit model has been used to estimate global N2O em...
Article
Robust estimates of CO2 budget, CO2 exchanged between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere, are necessary to better understand the role of the terrestrial biosphere in mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Over the past decade, this field of research has advanced through understanding of the differences and similarities of two fundamentally d...
Article
Full-text available
Inland waters, including streams and rivers, are active components of the global carbon cycle. Despite the large areal extent of the world’s mountains, the role of mountain streams for global carbon fluxes remains elusive. Using recent insights from gas exchange in turbulent streams, we found that areal CO2 evasion fluxes from mountain streams equa...
Article
Full-text available
Few Earth system models adequately represent the unique permafrost soil biogeochemistry and its respective processes; this significantly contributes to uncertainty in estimating their responses, and that of the planet at large, to warming. Likewise, the riverine component of what is known as the “boundless carbon cycle” is seldom recognised in Eart...
Article
Full-text available
In this second part of a two-part study, we performed a simulation of the carbon and water budget of the Lena catchment with the land surface model ORCHIDEE MICT-LEAK, enabled to simulate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production in soils and its transport and fate in high-latitude inland waters. The model results are evaluated for their ability to...
Article
Full-text available
Soil erosion by rainfall and runoff is an important process behind the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) over land, hereby impacting the exchange of carbon (C) between land, atmosphere and rivers. However, the net role of soil erosion in the global C cycle is still unclear as it involves small-scale SOC removal, transport and re-depositio...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this second part of a two-part study, we perform a simulation of the carbon and water budget of the Lena catchment with the land surface model ORCHIDEE MICT-LEAK, enabled to simulate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production in soils and its transport and fate in high latitudes inland waters. The model results are evaluated in their ability to r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Few Earth System models adequately represent the unique permafrost soil biogeochemistry and its respective processes; this significantly contributes to uncertainty in estimating their responses, and that of the planet at large, to warming. Likewise, the riverine component of what is known as the "boundless carbon cycle" is seldom recognized in Eart...
Article
Full-text available
The river‐floodplain network plays an important role in the carbon (C) budget of the Amazon basin, as it transports and processes a significant fraction of the C fixed by terrestrial vegetation, most of which evades as CO2 from rivers and floodplains back to the atmosphere. There is empirical evidence that exceptionally dry or wet years have an imp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A fraction of the terrestrial uptake of CO2 is displaced as organic carbon along the terrestrial-aquatic continuum which represents an important link in the global carbon (C) cycle (Battin et al. 2009; Regnier et al. 2013). This lateral export is important for the terrestrial C budget, but hard to assess based on empirical methods (Regnier et al. 2...
Technical Report
Over the last decade the number of regional to global scale studies of river chemical fluxes and their steering factors increased rapidly, entailing a growing demand for appropriate databases to calculate mass budgets, to calibrate models, or to test hypotheses. The presented GLObal RIver CHemistry database GLORICH combines an assemblage of hydroch...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from inland waters remain a major source of uncertainty in global greenhouse gas budgets. N2O emissions are typically estimated using emission factors (EFs), defined as the proportion of the terrestrial nitrogen (N) load to a water body that is emitted as N2O to the atmosphere. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Ch...
Article
Full-text available
Erosion is an Earth system process that transports carbon laterally across the land surface and is currently accelerated by anthropogenic activities. Anthropogenic land cover change has accelerated soil erosion rates by rainfall and runoff substantially, mobilizing vast quantities of soil organic carbon (SOC) globally. At timescales of decennia to...
Article
Full-text available
Current land surface models (LSMs) typically represent soils in a very simplistic way, assuming soil organic carbon (SOC) as a bulk, and thus impeding a correct representation of deep soil carbon dynamics. Moreover, LSMs generally neglect the production and export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to rivers, leading to overestimations of...
Article
Full-text available
Current global models of the carbon (C) cycle consider only vertical gas exchanges between terrestrial or oceanic reservoirs and the atmosphere, thus not considering the lateral transport of carbon from the continents to the oceans. Therefore, those models implicitly consider all of the C which is not respired to the atmosphere to be stored on land...
Article
Full-text available
The onset and expansion of agriculture has accelerated soil erosion by rainfall and runoff substantially, mobilizing vast quantities of soil organic carbon (SOC) globally. Studies show that at timescales of decennia to millennia this mobilized SOC can significantly alter previously estimated carbon emissions from land use change (LUC). However, a f...
Article
Full-text available
The high-latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere are a nexus for the interaction between land surface physical properties and their exchange of carbon and energy with the atmosphere. At these latitudes, two carbon pools of planetary significance – those of the permanently frozen soils (permafrost), and of the great expanse of boreal forest – ar...
Article
Full-text available
Current Land Surface Models (LSMs) typically represent soils in a very simplistic way, assuming soil organic carbon (SOC) as a bulk, thus impeding a correct representation of deep soil carbon dynamics. Moreover, LSMs generally neglect the production and export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to rivers, leading to overestimations of the...
Article
Full-text available
Lateral transfer of carbon (C) from terrestrial ecosystems into the inland water network is an important component of the global C cycle, which sustains a large aquatic CO2 evasion flux fuelled by the decomposition of allochthonous C inputs. Globally, estimates of the total C exports through the terrestrial–aquatic interface range from 1.5 to 2.7 P...
Article
Full-text available
Current global models of the carbon (C) cycle consider only vertical gas exchanges between terrestrial or oceanic reservoirs and the atmosphere, thus not considering lateral transport of carbon from the continents to the oceans. Therefore, those models implicitly consider that all the C which is not respired to the atmosphere is stored on land, hen...
Article
The damming of rivers represents one of the most far-reaching human modifications of the flows of water and associated matter from land to sea. Dam reservoirs are hotspots of sediment accumulation, primary productivity (P) and carbon mineralization (R) along the river continuum. Here we show that for the period 1970–2030, global carbon mineralizati...