Roni Tibon

Roni Tibon
University of Nottingham | Notts · School of Psychology

Ph.D

About

73
Publications
8,479
Reads
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450
Citations
Citations since 2016
49 Research Items
411 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
March 2015 - present
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2015 - November 2018
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2012 - March 2015
Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
Full-text available
Stimulus repetition normally causes reduced neural activity in brain regions that process that stimulus. Some theories claim that this “repetition suppression” reflects local mechanisms such as neuronal fatigue or sharpening within a region, whereas other theories claim that it results from changed connectivity between regions, following changes in...
Preprint
Fast mapping (FM) is a hypothetical, incidental learning process that allows rapid acquisition of new words. Using an implicit reaction time measure in a FM paradigm, Coutanche and Thompson‐Schill (2014) showed evidence of lexical competition within 10 minutes of nonwords being learned as names of unknown items, consistent with same‐day lexicalisat...
Preprint
Stimulus repetition normally causes reduced neural activity in brain regions that process that stimulus. Some theories claim that this “repetition suppression” reflects local mechanisms such as neuronal fatigue or sharpening within a region, whereas other theories claim that it results from changed connectivity between regions, following changes in...
Article
Some aspects of our memory are enhanced by emotion, whereas others can be unaffected or even hindered. Previous studies reported impaired associative memory of emotional content, an effect termed associative "emotional interference". The current study used EEG and an associative recognition paradigm to investigate the cognitive and neural mechanism...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence have implicated the lateral parietal cortex (LPC) in a myriad of cognitive domains, generating numerous influential theoretical models. However, these theories fail to explain why distinct cognitive activities appear to implicate common neural regions. Here we discuss a unifying model in which...
Article
Full-text available
Early detection of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is vital to reduce the burden of dementia and for developing effective treatments. Neuroimaging can detect early brain changes, such as hippocampal atrophy in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a prodromal state of AD. However, selecting the most informative imaging features by machine-learning requires man...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, cognitive neuroscience has experienced unprecedented growth in the availability of large-scale datasets. These developments hold great methodological and theoretical promise: they allow increased statistical power, the use of nonparametric and generative models, the examination of individual differences, and more. Nevertheless, unlike mos...
Article
Full-text available
Good Scientific Practice (GSP) refers to both explicit and implicit rules, recommendations, and guidelines that help scientists to produce work that is of the highest quality at any given time, and to efficiently share that work with the community for further scrutiny or utilization. For experimental research using magneto- and electroencephalograp...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep quality changes dramatically from young to old age, but its effects on brain dynamics and cognitive functions are not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that a shift in brain networks dynamics relates to sleep quality and cognitive performance across the lifespan. Network dynamics were assessed using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Good Scientific Practice (GSP) refers to both explicit and implicit rules or guidelines that help scientists to produce work that is of the highest quality at any given time, and to efficiently share that work with the community for further scrutiny or utilization. For experimental research using magneto- and electroencephalography (MEEG), GSP inc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Sleep quality changes dramatically from young to old age, but its effects on brain dynamics and cognitive functions are not yet fully specified. We applied Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) to resting-state MEG data from a large cohort (N=564) of population-based adults (aged 18-88), in order to characterize transient neural networks and to relate their...
Preprint
Full-text available
Diagnosis criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) rely on cognitive symptoms and do not require specific biomarker evidence of pathology. Nevertheless, patients may still have subtle brain changes that are identifiable with neuroimaging. To classify MCI patients vs. healthy age-matched controls, two algorithms-Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and S...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early detection of Alzheimers Disease (AD) is vital to reduce the burden of dementia and for developing effective treatments. Neuroimaging can detect early brain changes, such as hippocampal atrophy in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a prodromal state of AD. However, selecting the most informative imaging features by machine-learning requires many...
Article
It is important to maintain cognitive function in old age, yet the neural substrates that support successful cognitive ageing remain unclear. One factor that might be crucial, but has been overlooked due to limitations of previous data and methods, is the ability of brain networks to flexibly reorganize and coordinate over a millisecond time-scale....
Article
It is important to maintain cognitive function in old age, yet the neural substrates that support successful cognitive ageing remain unclear. One factor that might be crucial, but has been overlooked due to limitations of previous data and methods, is the ability of brain networks to flexibly reorganize and coordinate over a millisecond time-scale....
Preprint
Full-text available
It is important to maintain cognitive function in old age, yet the neural substrates that support successful cognitive ageing remain unclear. One factor that might be crucial, but has been overlooked due to limitations of previous data and methods, is the ability of brain networks to flexibly reorganise and coordinate over a millisecond time-scale....
Article
Full-text available
Prereg posters are conference posters that present planned scientific projects. We provide preliminary evidence for their value in receiving constructive feedback, promoting open science and supporting early-career researchers.
Preprint
Full-text available
Some aspects of our memory are enhanced by emotion, whereas other can be unaffected or even hinder. In particular, previous studies report impaired associative memory of emotional content, an effect termed associative "emotion interference". The current study utilized EEG and an associative recognition paradigm to investigate the cognitive and neur...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prereg posters are conference posters that present planned scientific projects. We provide empirical evidence for their value, and establish prereg posters as means to receive valuable feedback, promote Open Science, and support Early Career Researchers.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To select among competing generative models of timeseries data, it is necessary to balance the goodness of fit (accuracy) and model complexity. Bayesian methods are a mathematically principled way to achieve this balance. However, when performing simulations – to assess the identifiability of models (face validation) – the best model identified by...
Article
Full-text available
How do we recall vivid details from our past based only on sparse cues? Research suggests that the phenomenological reinstatement of past experiences is accompanied by neural reinstatement of the original percept. This process critically depends on the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Within the MTL, perirhinal cortex (PRC) and parahippocampal cortex (P...
Article
Full-text available
Although it is often assumed that memory of episodic associations requires recollection, it has been suggested that, when stimuli are experienced as a unit, earlier memory processes might contribute to their subsequent associative recognition. We investigated the effects of associative relations and perceptual domain during episodic encoding on the...
Article
Full-text available
Much evidence suggests that the angular gyrus (AnG) is involved in episodic memory, but its precise role has yet to be determined. We examined two possible accounts within the same experimental paradigm: the "cortical binding of relational activity" (CoBRA) account (Shimamura, 2011), which suggests that the AnG acts as a convergence zone that binds...
Preprint
Full-text available
How do we recall vivid details from our past based only on sparse cues? Research suggests that the phenomenological reinstatement of past experiences is accompanied by neural reinstatement of the original percept. This process critically depends on the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Within the MTL, perirhinal cortex (PRC) and parahippocampal cortex (P...
Article
The ventral lateral parietal cortex (VLPC) shows robust activation during episodic retrieval, and is involved in content representation, as well as in the evaluation of memory traces. This suggests that the VLPC has a crucial contribution to the quality of recollection and the subjective experience of remembering, and situates it at the intersectio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although it is often assumed that memory of episodic associations requires recollection, it has been suggested that when stimuli are experienced as a unit, familiarity processes might contribute to their subsequent associative recognition. We investigated the effects of associative relations and perceptual domain during episodic encoding on retriev...
Article
Full-text available
Events that conform to our expectations, that is, are congruent with our world knowledge or schemas, are better remembered than unrelated events. Yet events that conflict with schemas can also be remembered better. We examined this apparent paradox in 4 experiments, in which schemas were established by training ordinal relationships between randoml...
Preprint
Full-text available
Much evidence suggests that the angular gyrus (AnG) is involved in episodic memory, but its precise role is yet to be determined. We examined two possible accounts, within the same experimental paradigm: the CoBRA account (Shimamura, 2011), which suggests that the AnG acts as a convergence zone that binds multimodal episodic features; and the Subje...
Article
Full-text available
Unitization refers to the creation of a new unit from previously distinct items. The concept of unitization has been used to explain how novel pairings between items can be remembered without requiring recollection, by virtue of new, item-like representations that enable familiarity-based retrieval. We tested an alternative account of unitization –...
Article
Unitization refers to the creation of a new unit from previously distinct items. The concept of unitization has been used to explain how novel pairings between items can be remembered without requiring recollection, by virtue of new, item-like representations that enable familiarity-based retrieval. We tested an alternative account of unitization –...
Article
In studies of behavioral reconsolidation interference, reactivation of a consolidated memory using some form of reminder is followed by the presentation of new information that can cause interference with that memory. Under these conditions, the interference not only impairs retrieval by indirect processes such as cue interference, but supposedly d...
Article
Full-text available
In studies of behavioral reconsolidation interference, reactivation of a consolidated memory using some form of reminder is followed by the presentation of new information that can cause interference with that memory. Under these conditions, the interference not only impairs retrieval by indirect processes such as cue interference, but supposedly d...
Article
Academic conferences are among the most prolific scientific activities, yet the current abstract submission and review process has serious limitations. We propose a revised process that would address these limitations, achieve some of the aims of Open Science, and stimulate discussion throughout the entire lifecycle of the scientific work.
Article
Full-text available
Academic conferences are among the most prolific scientific activities, yet the current abstract submission and review process has serious limitations. We propose a revised process that would address these limitations, achieve some of the aims of Open Science, and stimulate discussion throughout the entire lifecycle of the scientific work.
Preprint
In studies of behavioral reconsolidation interference, reactivation of a consolidated memory using some form of reminder is followed by the presentation of new information that can cause interference with that memory. Under these conditions, the interference not only impairs retrieval by indirect processes such as cue interference, but supposedly d...
Preprint
Full-text available
Unitization refers to the creation of a new unit from previously distinct items. The concept of unitization has been used to explain how novel pairings between items can be remembered without requiring recollection, by virtue of new, item-like representations that enable familiarity-based retrieval. We tested an alternative account of unitization –...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We examined whether episodic binding by unitisation can produce schematic-like connections that would subsequently facilitate encoding of new information. We operationalised "unitisation" as the difference between two unrelated words being linked by a definition, relative to two words being linked by a sentence during an initial Study phase. Next,...
Article
Full-text available
Memory for episodic associations declines in aging, ostensibly due to decreased recollection abilities. Accordingly, associative unitization - the encoding of associated items as one integrated entity - may potentially attenuate age-related associative deficits by enabling familiarity-based retrieval, which is relatively preserved in aging. To test...
Preprint
Full-text available
Events that conform to our expectations, i.e, are congruent with our world knowledge or schemas, are better remembered than unrelated events. Yet events that conflict with schemas can also be remembered better. We examined this apparent paradox in four experiments, in which schemas were established by training ordinal relationships between randomly...
Preprint
It has been proposed that although unitization benefits associative episodic memory, such benefits may exact a cost of poorer subsequent memory for the individual component elements forming these associations. However, unitization effects on item memory may be a function of whether items were unitized in a top-down fashion (i.e., through encoding i...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to remember new information can be influenced by the degree to which it matches previously established knowledge. This phenomenon was first described over 80 years ago by [Bartlett (1932)][1], who introduced the role of “schema” as an activated part of semantic memory that matches
Article
Full-text available
Normal aging is usually accompanied by greater memory decline for associations than for single items. Though associative memory is generally supported by recollection, it has been suggested that familiarity can also contribute to associative memory when stimuli can be unitized and encoded as a single entity. Given that familiarity remains intact du...
Article
Full-text available
Using ways of thinking that tie together, or bind, several pieces of information into one single piece of information means that we can fit more into our memory, and it can help us remember information better. The type of remembering used for information that is linked together can be quite different from the type of thinking used for only one piec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We examined whether episodic binding by unitisation can produce schematic-like neocortical connections that would subsequently facilitate encoding of new information. During an initial Study phase, 24 participants learned pairs of unrelated stimuli using unitisation and non-unitisation manipulations. Next, at Relearning, a studied cue word was re-p...
Article
Full-text available
The cognitive events examined in many event-related potentials (ERPs) studies do not occur in aneuralvacuum,andseparatingthesignalsofinterestfromthebrain’sbackgroundelectricalactivitygenerally requires averaging multiple EEG segments of a condition of interest (Luck, 2005). Inaddition to within-subject averaging, the vast majority of ERP studies ar...
Article
Full-text available
The formation of mnemonic associations can occur between items processed in temporal proximity. It has been proposed that such intertemporal associations are not unitizable, and may therefore be retrieved only via recollective processes. To examine this claim, we conducted a magnetoencephalograph study of recognition memory for items encoded and re...
Article
Full-text available
Although memory of episodic associations is generally considered to be recollective in nature, it has been suggested that when stimuli are experienced as a unit, familiarity-related processes might contribute to their subsequent associative recognition. Furthermore, intradomain associations are believed to be unitized more readily than interdomain...
Article
Full-text available
Binding aspects of an experience that are distributed over time is an important element of episodic memory. In the current study, we examined how the temporal complexity of an experience may govern the processes required for its retrieval. We recorded event-related potentials during episodic cued recall following pair associate learning of concurre...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the time course of processes supporting episodic cued recall. To examine these processes, we recorded event-related scalp electrical potentials during episodic cued recall following pair-associate learning of unimodal object-picture pairs and crossmodal object-picture and sound pairs. Successful cued recall of unimodal associa...
Article
Full-text available
Failed knowledge recall attempts are sometimes accompanied by a strong feeling of imminent success, giving rise to a "tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) experience. Similar to successful retrieval (i.e., the Know state, K), a TOT commences with strong cue familiarity but involves only partial retrieval of related information. We sought to characterize the co...