Rongbin Han

Rongbin Han
University of Georgia | UGA · Department of International Affairs

Doctor of Philosophy

About

27
Publications
12,870
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
424
Citations
Introduction
Rongbin Han currently works at the Department of International Affairs, University of Georgia. He does research in contentious politics, media and internet studies, with a focus on China. He is the author of Contesting Cyberspace in China: Online Expression and Authoritarian Resilience (Columbia University Press, 2018).
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2013 - August 2019
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2006 - December 2012
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2006 - December 2012
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Political Science
July 2003 - June 2006
National University of Singapore
Field of study
  • Political Science
September 1999 - June 2003
Peking University
Field of study
  • International Politics

Publications

Publications (27)
Book
The Internet is often expected to serve as an antidote to authoritarianism. As the Arab Spring has demonstrated, digitally-empowered citizens have even succeeded in overthrowing entrenched autocracies. However, many authoritarian regimes and illiberal democracies have learned to control and utilize the Internet, as in cases of China, Russia, Turkey...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines popular nationalism and regime support in the Xi era by evaluating news comments from a major overseas Chinese website on the 2018 constitutional amendments removing presidential term limits. It finds that the event was not only contested among overseas and domestic Chinese, but also has alienated many nationalists who previou...
Article
Full-text available
Autocracies can conduct “strategic censorship" online by selectively targeting different types of content, and by adjusting the level of information control. While studies have confirmed the state’s selective targeting behaviour in censorship, few have empirically examined how the autocracies may adjust the control level. Using data with a 6-year s...
Article
Full-text available
Through a detailed case study of house eviction in peri-urban China, as well as original data from an online survey experiment, this article explores the opportunistic bargaining phenomenon in China in which citizens leverage the policy priorities of authorities with tactics that are not approved by the state to bargain for goals beyond what the st...
Article
This article explores authoritarian responsiveness in the digital era using data from China’s most popular Internet forum. In addition to some limited evidence of the nature of the complaints and the public attention they attract affecting responsiveness, we find that government responsiveness in China depends more on local leadership style and bur...
Article
Full-text available
To what extent does the co-existence of the empowering Internet and resilient authoritarianism rely on the state-controlled information environment? Drawing on online ethnography and a dataset of Amazon reviews, this article addresses the question by examining the debate over the memoir of a Chinese-American entrepreneur. It finds that such digital...
Article
Full-text available
Using a mixed-method approach, we explore how the Chinese government frames environmentally controversial projects as well as how citizens may react to the government's framing strategy. Through content analysis of state-run media reports on paraxylene (a chemical product with many industrial implications, also known as PX) and waste incineration p...
Article
Full-text available
The previous literature suggests that citizens calculate the benefits of immigrants by assessing their impact on economic prospects. This paper argues that a type of social demand-the demand for marriage-also induces support for more liberal immigration policies. We conducted a survey experiment with 3,000 adults in China, where the population face...
Chapter
Full-text available
Cyber nationalism in China is on the rise, with complex implications for authoritarian rule. On one hand, nationalistic netizens in general demonstrate pro-regime inclinations and side with the state in online debates. On the other hand, popular nationalism often directly contests the state's claims to nationalist legitimacy and runs the risk of co...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores how pluralization of expression may have in some ways worked against democratic discourses in Chinese cyberspace. Using a mix-method approach combining in-depth online ethnographic work and computer-aided content analysis, it investigates how ordinary netizens have engaged the discourse competition on “gongzhi,” an abbreviated...
Article
Censored: Distraction and Diversion Inside China’s Great Firewall. By Margaret E. Roberts. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. 288p. $29.95 cloth. - Volume 16 Issue 4 - Rongbin Han
Article
Full-text available
This article explores why the term public intellectual has turned into a disgraceful label in Chinese cyberspace. By examining how netizens have constructed the negative perception of public intellectuals, it shows that the Internet has not only empowered regime critics but also promoted the pluralization of expression by bringing different values,...
Article
Full-text available
In what ways has the expansion of the Internet transformed local governance in China? Through analysis of over 2000 leaked official emails from a district-level Internet propaganda office, the article finds that the Internet has served more as a tool to enhance control rather than to improve governance at the local level. In particular, local autho...
Article
Full-text available
This essay examines citizen participation in and state responses to online supervision in China. It argues that the internet has only empowered Chinese citizens in selective ways by enabling them more to expose individual cases of corruption and official misconduct than to pursue systematic changes. Such ‘selective-empowerment’ effects allow the st...
Article
The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China Edited by Jacques Delisle , Avery Goldstein and Guobin Yang Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016 vi + 284 pp. $49.95; £32.50 ISBN 978-0-8122-2351-4 - Volume 228 - Rongbin Han
Article
Full-text available
Urban heritage preservation is gaining momentum in China as massive urban renovation has put many historical sites under threat. A group of renowned scholars, experts, and artists have played an important role in leading and coordinating the movement. How do these cultural elites promote urban heritage preservation? How do they mediate state-societ...
Article
China's Contested Internet. Edited by Guobin Yang. Copenhagen: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 2015. xii + 310 pp. £18.99. ISBN 978-87-7694-176-5 - Volume 225 - Rongbin Han
Chapter
Full-text available
Building on existing studies, this chapter examines cyberpolitics in the world’s largest authoritarian regime, China, and attempts to evaluate the impact of the Internet and social media on the authoritarian rule. Through analysis of cyberactivism and state adaptation in relation to each other, I argue that though the digital technology has empower...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies on internet politics in China have gone beyond the once dominant control-liberalization perspective and directed intellectual attention to the varieties of online activism. Based on extensive in-depth online ethnographic work, this project explores the pluralization of online expression in Chinese cyberspace. Following a constituency...
Article
The modernization theory contends that there is a link between education and democracy. Yet few empirical studies have been done to investigate the role of higher education on promoting democratic values in the Chinese context. Using China General Social Survey 2006, this paper generates several findings which are not completely consistent with the...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on public expression in China tend to focus on how the state and internet users (netizens) struggle over the limits of online expression. Few have systematically traced discourse competition within state-imposed boundaries, particularly how the authoritarian state has adapted to manage, rather than censor, online expression. This paper expl...
Article
Full-text available
Election procedures in rural China have improved greatly over the last twenty years and a good number of reasonably free and fair elections have been held. But changes in the exercise of power have not kept up with changes in the access to power. In many communities, township authorities, Party branches, and social forces (such as clans, religious...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
One article forthcoming in the International Journal of Communication; One book chapter accepted for publication