Romain Malejacq

Romain Malejacq
Radboud University | RU · Centre for International Conflict Analysis & Management

PhD

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32
Publications
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129
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Publications

Publications (32)
Article
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Résumé La délégation de la violence en contexte de guerre civile est souvent lue comme une érosion de l’État au profit d'acteurs non-étatiques incontrôlables. Nous soulignons ici les limites de cette lecture à partir d'une analyse du conflit afghan, en particulier de l'arbitrage qui a eu lieu sous l'administration Karzai entre l'accroissement des e...
Article
The ‘Sahelistan’ discourse that conflates conflict dynamics in Afghanistan and Mali is widespread in Western media and policy circles. We argue that such representations contribute to the adoption of one-size-fits-all conflict management policies. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in both places, we also argue that these standard templates of interven...
Chapter
This chapter shows how Abdul Rashid Dostum, a former pro-government militia leader, at one point ruled over most of northern Afghanistan. It shows that he never broke free from either his Uzbek identity or his role as an ethnic entrepreneur. This has in turn allowed him to successfully project authority both domestically and internationally, and ev...
Chapter
This chapter demonstrates that the self-proclaimed amir of western Afghanistan, Ismail Khan, is a typical warlord. When the conditions do not allow him to concentrate all sources of power simultaneously, he uses his authority to mediate between different levels of politics and make himself indispensable. Indeed, Ismail Khan can no longer be conside...
Chapter
This chapter demonstrates that warlords are skilled political entrepreneurs who best exploit the means at their disposal to make themselves indispensable well beyond the battlefield. Here, warlord survival is a game in which political entrepreneurs express their power through a variety of resources, which they convert and project to maximize their...
Chapter
This introductory chapter explains how warlords survive, during and after war. Here, warlords are defined as astute political entrepreneurs with a proven ability to organize violence and control territory. They exert and transform authority across different spheres (ideological, economic, military, social, and political) and at different levels of...
Chapter
This chapter deals with two atypical warlords, Ahmad Shah Massoud and his successor, Mohammad Qasim Fahim. The former was a “mix” between a patrimonial leader and an ideological one, a “militant” whose objective was to capture the central state, a particularity that is reflected in the way he accumulated and converted his power. Fahim is also atypi...
Chapter
This chapter argues that warlords are not mere challengers to the state. They represent alternative forms of authority that are well suited to certain circumstances (at times better suited than states). They will not disappear under the increasing pressure of state centralization. Hence, this chapter unpacks the complex relationships between warlor...
Chapter
This concluding chapter further articulates the core implication of this book: that state building is impossible in fragmented societies without significant concessions to nonstate power holders. Most international actors involved in Afghanistan and other war-torn countries would prefer that warlords fall into insignificance to favor the constructi...
Book
How do warlords survive and even thrive in contexts that are explicitly set up to undermine them? How do they rise after each fall? This book answers these questions. Drawing on hundreds of in-depth interviews in Afghanistan between 2007 and 2018, with ministers, governors, a former vice-president, warlords and their entourages, opposition leaders,...
Book
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How do warlords survive and even thrive in contexts that are explicitly set up to undermine them? How do they rise after each fall? Warlord Survival answers these questions. Drawing on hundreds of in-depth interviews in Afghanistan between 2007 and 2018, with ministers, governors, a former vice-president, warlords and their entourages, opposition l...
Book
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Artisan de la formation d’une école française des Relations internationales, Bertrand Badie observe depuis 40 ans les mutations de l’espace mondial. Ses travaux, d’une étonnante actualité, forment autant de témoins des transformations qui se sont succédé depuis les années 1980 : contestations et aporie de la puissance ; multiplication des acteurs s...
Article
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How do warlords build their legitimacy and eventually exert authority? The case of Afghan leader Ahmad Shah Massoud demonstrates that warlords do not only build legitimacy through the internal provision of goods and services to the population under their control, but also build their legitimacy by projecting authority externally, through the develo...
Article
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/04/05/yes-its-possible-to-do-research-in-conflict-zones-this-is-how/?utm_term=.1cbd5f549db2
Article
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https://theconversation.com/afghanistan-militias-after-a-decade-of-counter-insurrection-efforts-what-role-do-they-play-74727
Article
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https://theconversation.com/afghanistan-des-milices-pour-quoi-faire-69934
Article
Can fieldwork still be done in today’s most violent warzones? We contend that long-held methodological principles about power and impartiality do not hold in today’s conflict-ridden environments. Research of this kind can still be pursued, but only if the scholar’s place is reconceived as one of limited power and unavoidable partiality. We argue th...
Article
Despite efforts to bolster failed states over the past two decades, many states in the international system still exhibit endemic weakness. External intervention often leads to political instability and in most cases fails to foster state consolidation, instead empowering and creating ties with the ones it aims to weaken. Using the case of Afghanis...
Article
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Book Review - Auerswald, David P. and Stephen Saideman (2014) NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, ISBN: 9780691159386, 280 pages.
Chapter
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This publication was made possible through funding provided by the Governments of Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. Th is monograph is a collection of papers that were presented at the African Human Security Initiative conference that was held in Addis Ababa in February 2008. It discusses the changing methodologies used to analyse and ma...
Article
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Violence in the Mano River region has sometimes been analysed as a 'system of conflicts', but rarely from a human security point of view. By focusing on the individual, the author is thus trying to look beyond the nation-state, and to show how the conflict in Liberia bled on Sierra Leone (both in terms of human causes and human consequences), formi...

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Projects (5)