Romain Gougeon

Romain Gougeon
University of Saskatchewan | U of S · Department of Geological Sciences

Master of Science

About

20
Publications
7,725
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104
Citations
Introduction
Romain Gougeon currently works as a PhD Student at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan (Canada). His main areas of study are the ichnology and paleo-ecology of the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - June 2018
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Biology (BIOL 120.3; 2016, 2017); Biology (BIOL 121.3; 2017, 2018)
September 2015 - present
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2015 - May 2021
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Physical geology (GEOL 121; 2015); Historical geology (GEOL 122; 2016, 2017, 2018, 2020, 2021); Sedimentology (GEOL 245; 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021); International Field Study course (in Asturias, Spain; GEOL 405; 2019); Palaeontology (GEOL 247; 2020); Ichnology (GEOL 447; 2021)
Education
September 2015 - September 2021
University of Saskatchewan
Field of study
  • Geology
September 2012 - June 2014
Université de Rennes 1
Field of study
  • Prehistory, Palaeontology, Palaeoenvironments
September 2010 - June 2012
Université de Rennes 1
Field of study
  • Biology of Organisms

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The Ediacaran–Fortunian ichnofauna from Central Brittany (NW France) is revised for the first time since the pioneering work by Lebesconte at the end of the 19th century. The study is based on fossils from the type-localities of the historical Brioverian taxa Montfortia (traces from Montfort-sur- Meu) and Neantia (wrinkle surfaces from Néant-sur-Yv...
Article
Full-text available
The mixed layer of modern oceans is a zone of fully homogenized sediment resulting from bioturbation. The mixed layer is host to complex biogeochemical cycles that directly impact ecosystem functioning, affecting ocean productivity and marine biodiversity. The timing of origin of the mixed layer has been controversial, with estimates ranging from C...
Article
In northwestern France, the Brioverian series is a thick siliciclastic succession deposited during the Cadomian cycle (c. 750–540 Ma). In the uppermost Brioverian beds, previous studies unravelled an assemblage dominated by simple horizontal trace fossils associated with microbially stabilized surfaces. Here, we report Spirodesmos trace fossils – o...
Article
Taphrhelminthopsis was originally introduced for trace fossils with a bilobate lower surface recorded in post-Paleozoic deep-marine deposits but has more recently been reinterpreted convincingly as a preservational variant of Scolicia. However, Taphrhelminthopsis has also been used for Cambrian shallow-marine trace fossils, whose taxonomic affinity...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Chapel Island Formation (CIF) at the Burin Peninsula, Newfoundland, Canada, is a 1000+ m-thick siliciclastic succession that hosts the Cambrian GSSP (ca. 541 Ma) 2.4 m above the base of its member 2 (M2) at Fortune Head. In this section, the first appearance of Treptichnus pedum, the index fossil for the base of the Cambrian, but also of other...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Chapel Island Formation (CIF) of Newfoundland, Canada, is a 1000+ m-thick siliciclastic succession that hosts the Cambrian GSSP (ca. 541 Ma) 2.4 m above the base of its member 2 (M2) in Fortune Head. Although the first appearance of Treptichnus pedum was considered as the marker of the base of the Cambrian, other burrows typical of the Fortunia...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Cambrian GSSP (ca. 540 Ma) is marked by the appearance of complex trace fossil from the Treptichnus pedum Ichnofossil Assemblage Zone in the Chapel Island Formation (CIF) at Fortune Head, Newfoundland in Canada (Brasier et al., 1994). The CIF is a 1000+ m-thick, mostly continuous siliciclastic succession that ranges from the late Ediacaran to C...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Ediacaran-Cambrian transition is the place of striking changes in Earth ecosystems, with a diversification of life recorded by a complexification in animal behaviors. In a series of classic papers, Crimes (1974, 1987, 1992a, b) compiled worldwide data on trace fossil distribution from that time period, evaluating their potential as biomarkers a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The mixed layer of modern oceans is a zone of fully homogenized sediment resulting from bioturbation (Berger et al., 1979; Teal et al., 2008). The mixed layer is host to complex biogeochemical cycles that directly impact ecosystem functioning, affecting ocean productivity and marine biodiversity. However, the timing of appearance of a mixed zone at...
Article
Full-text available
The transition between the seemingly disparate Ediacaran and Cambrian faunas is both enigmatic and body-fossil poor. The Chapel Island Formation on the Burin Peninsula, Newfoundland, Canada, contains a rich diversity of ichnofossils, providing new insight into the nature of the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition and early Fortunian ecosystems. Five ichn...
Article
Body fossils are described for the first time from the Upper Brioverian (Ediacaran-Fortunian) deposits of Central Brittany (NW France). The material consists of a dozen of specimens preserved on two slates, recently collected in a quarry in Saint-Gonlay. The fossils, centimetric in size, have an elliptical and acuminated outline, with a peripheral...
Article
The beginning of the Cambrian explosion is characterized by the onset of infaunalization and the appearance of systematic patterns of burrowing. The trace fossil Gyrolithes is common in the Ediacaran-Cambrian Global Stratotype Section and Point, where it shows a higher diversity and burrow depth than previously reported from any Cambrian spiral ver...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The appearance of complex organisms on Earth is a critical event that has led to profound, irreversible changes of the seafloor. In particular, the base of the Cambrian (541.0 ± 1.0 Ma) is marked by the appearance of the complex trace fossil Treptichnus pedum 2.4 m above the base of member 2 of the Chapel Island Formation at Fortune Head, Burin Pen...
Presentation
The Ediacaran-Cambrian transition is the only boundary defined by the first appearance datum (FAD) of a trace fossil (Treptichnus pedum). Consequently, the placement of the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) at Fortune Head, Burin Peninsula, Newfoundland, has recently resurfaced as a topic of interest. Reluctance to the use of ichn...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Ediacaran–Fortunian ichnofauna from Central Brittany (NW France) is revised for the first time since the pioneering work by Lebesconte at the end of the 19th century. The study is based on fossils from the type-localities of the historical Brioverian taxa Montfortia (traces from Montfort-sur- Meu) and Neantia (wrinkle surfaces from Néant-sur-Yv...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Pioneer work by Paul Lebesconte in the late 19th century unraveled an intriguing fossil assemblage from the Brioverian of Central Brittany (Ediacaran-Fortunian of NW France). Recent investigations conducted by University of Rennes 1 (France) attempt to revise Lebesconte discoveries and decipher the paleo-ecology of this section at a critical time of life history.
Project
In 1992, the International Stratigraphic Commission ratified the Cambrian GSSP at the base of the Treptichnus pedum IAZ at Fortune Head, Newfoundland, Canada. Since then, important debate surrounds its validity and many researchers underscore the greater efficiency of other proxies (e.g. Small Shelly Fossils, BACE δ13Ccarb excursion). The aim of this project is to clarify our understanding of early complex metazoan activities and evolutionary patterns that led to the Cambrian explosion.