Roland Ndille

Roland Ndille
University of Buea · Department of History: Faculty of Arts

BA/PGDE/M.A./M.Ed/D.Ed/D.Litt. et Phil

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26
Publications
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Introduction
Roland Ndille is Associate Professor of History and Educational Studies and HOD-History at the University of Buea-Cameroon with teaching and Research interest in Decolonial Epistemology, History of Education and Religion, History Education in Cameroon and South Africa, the Colonial History of Cameroon etc. He studied in Cameroon, Sweden and South Africa. He has also worked and researched at the University of Johannesburg and the University if the Witwatersrand in South Africa

Publications

Publications (26)
Chapter
This chapter draws on the author's own experiences as a student and educator to provide another perspective of inclusive education in Cameroon. It is a call to attention to the day to day challenges that students with disabilities face in acquiring education in inclusive settings in the country. It may suffice for policy to state that education for...
Article
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This article sets out to present Joshua Dibundu and Lotin Same, two clergymen and contemporaries of John Chilembwe of Nyasaland and Simon Kibangu of the Congo, who stood out against European missionary pressure and colonial administrative oppression in an effort to establish and sustain the first African Independent Church (AIC) in Cameroon: the Na...
Chapter
This chapter is a historical analysis of the development of education in Cameroon. It addresses, principally, the evolution of such policies and how they have impacted on educational provision in the rural areas. Rurality and education have been consciously linked in government educational policy planning and implementation in Cameroon. Four princi...
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Since independence, one of the greatest worries of African states has been how to maintain national cohesion amongst the multiplicity of ethnic groups which characterize them. My aim in this paper is to show that, other factors notwithstanding, national integration had been a major educational ideology in Cameroon and that it contributed to the pea...
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Research has established the belated and underdeveloped nature of colonial education in Southern Cameroons throughout the British period of administration (1916-1961). Regarding higher education, the number of university graduates was far less than the manpower demands at independence with implications on the political and economic growth of the te...
Presentation
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This presentation is to help students address problems of presentation of their literature review sections in their proposals and thesis
Article
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Africanization of education was a major policy option in most countries in Africa upon the attainment of independence and its relevance could not be overemphasized. More than half a century after, it behoves many to ask questions such as where are we with the project. Have we achieved it or are we still on the way to policy consolidation? Are there...
Article
In this paper, I revisit the popular position in British colonial education literature which suggests there is no evidence that Britain had any predetermined wish to dominate, subvert or control the minds of Africans with an official education policy emanating from Whitehall, the seat of the colonial office. I have used archival data and some criti...
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The reunification of British Southern Cameroons and La Republique du Cameroun 1961 required the adoption of new national policies which were to guarantee that none of the colonial identities were jeopardized. In doing this, the Federal Republic adopted harmonization as a policy framework for the establishment of a new national educational system th...
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Abstract The call to a global education project involves transformations of educational ideologies, policy formulation, systems restructuring, and curriculum reforms that go beyond national/local considerations. While advocates of globalization have identified inherent advantages in these transformations, the paper argues that in terms of the ‘glob...
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Within the perspective of postcolonial state building in Africa and the quests to Africanize/indigenize, the study hinges on the education and manpower nexus to examine the state of preparedness of the Trust Territory of the Cameroons in the days leading to independence to establish an Indigenous civil service as the British and Nigerian colonial a...
Preprint
Africanization of education was a major policy option in most countries in Africa upon the attainment of independence. This is because of the perceived negative effects of colonial education. The paper is an empirical sources study which discusses Africanization as an epistemicide and analyses efforts by some African states to Africanize their educ...
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The British colonial policy of education in the Southern Cameroons was guided by the philosophy of adapting education to the mentality, aptitude and occupations of the local population. This policy was gradually abandoned in the 1950s when it was realized that it was serving the colonial exploitative agenda of keeping natives to a permanently rural...
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The writing of history in Cameroon began with the advent of western education and the development of literacy. Like in most other pre-literate societies historical reconstruction relied heavily on the memory of men. Oral tradition has therefore been hailed as the panacea to the Eurocentric problem of pre-European African historical emptiness. Howev...
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The paper attempts a comparative analysis of the policy and practice of education in British and French administered spheres of Cameroon which came to be implicated in the policy of harmonization of education following the reunification of the two spheres in October 1961 to form the present day Republic of Cameroon. It presents issues of ideology,...
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The teaching of history in countries that have experienced colonisation has come under serious scrutiny at different times in their history. Worries about the contents of history programmes have been raised by politicians as well as educational technocrats who question the relevance of what is being taught as history to those on the classroom pews....
Chapter
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A point of departure for us in this chapter are the calls for us Africans to be conscious about ourselves; to liberate ourselves (Biko, 1978); to decolonise our minds (Ngugi, 1986); and to “emancipate ourselves from mental slavery” (Bob Marley’s Redemption Song). Within the broad thematic context of this book, such calls translate into the Africani...
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Several studies in the history of Christianity in Africa have described instances where the granting of permission for European missionaries to operate on native soils was on the condition of non-interference in native traditional worship. Coexistence between traditionalists and Christians was apparently the modus vivendi. But, the rare case of a w...
Article
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Cameroon has recorded disasters, both natural and man-made, in the past. The coastal city of Limbe and many other geographical locations are potential sites for future disasters. On the basis of interviews and related primary and secondary literature, this article looks at past occurrences of floods in Limbe, particularly those of 2001, and how the...

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Projects (2)
Project
Curriculum policies in Cameroon and South Africa suggest a move towards local and national contents, the study of the history of precolonial African societies and Africans as agents of the history taught in the schools in these countries. The project surveys the extent to which this has been carried out through a critical analysis of policy documents, syllabuses, textbooks. It hopes to make proposals for best practices that would meet this policy orientation.