Róisín Howard

Róisín Howard
University of Limerick | UL · Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering

PhD

About

21
Publications
61,458
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120
Citations
Introduction
Senior Software Engineer at WP Engine. Graduate of University of Limerick B.Eng in Computer Engineering 2012 & PhD in 2017. Irish Research Council Enterprise Partnership Postgraduate Scholarship Award Recipient.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - present
University of Limerick
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Matlab Course delivered form a movement science perspective for post-graduates, mature students, academic staff and support staff in the Biomechanics Research Unit.
September 2014 - September 2015
University of Limerick
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Teaching Assistant for the 1st Year Computer Software modules. Languages include: Java & Matlab
September 2013 - present
University of Limerick
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/ref/10.1080/14763141.2016.1174289 This paper examines the use of sensor devices in sports biomechanics, focusing on current frequency of use of Electromyography (EMG) device preferences. Researchers in the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports were invited to participate in an online survey. Responses on mu...
Article
Full-text available
Sensor devices are an integral part of human movement analysis. The use of sensors in sports performance and injury prevention is extremely useful. Over the years wireless systems have become increasingly popular and the analysis of human movement has been therefore simplified. Inertial measurement units are very popular in physical activity monito...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to explore the use of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) on Electromyography (EMG) data to distinguish between individual muscle activations due to its capabilities of signal separation. EMG data was gathered on seven participants using the Delsys Trigno Wireless EMG system. Participants performed movements which tar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of the phasic muscle activity of 8 lower limb muscles during performance of the shot put field event in track and field athletics. Six shot putters performed 3 standing and 3 full linear glide technique throws. Electromyography (EMG) of 8 lower limb muscles was recorded during the tria...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to compare force calculated using accelerometer data from the SHIMMER device, with force platform data on countermovement and drop jumps. Twelve physically active adults performed 5 counter movement jumps and 5 drop jumps from a height of 0.30 m. An accelerometer was attached near the participant's centre of mass and s...
Thesis
Full-text available
Muscles are the key drivers in any human movement. Since the muscles generate the forces and consequently the impulses to move the athlete from one position to another, it can be useful to study the muscle activity during sports movements to help with optimisation of technique, injury prevention and performance enhancements. Due to recent advances...
Article
Full-text available
In the shot put, the athlete’s muscles are responsible for generating the impulses to move the athlete and project the shot into the air. Information on phasic muscle activity is lacking for the glide shot put event and therefore important technical information for coaches is not currently available. This study provides an electromyography (EMG) an...
Article
Full-text available
The use of electromyography (EMG) is widely recognised as a valuable tool for enhancing the understanding of performance drivers and potential injury risk in sprinting. The timings of muscle activations relative to running gait cycle phases and the technology used to obtain muscle activation data during sprinting are of particular interest to scien...
Data
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Data
Full-text available
Data
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to explore the use of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) on surface Electromyography (EMG) data to distinguish between individual muscle activations due to its capabilities for signal separation. EMG data was gathered on seven participants using the Delsys Trigno Wireless EMG system. Participants performed specific m...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Vertical jumps, such as drop jumps (DJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) are a very important measure in sports biomechanics research routinely used to monitor levels of performance in sports training and conditioning. As an alternative to the force platform, the force acting on the CoM may be estimated using accelerometers (Kenny et al. 2012, Linth...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to compare the use of both a force platform and Optojump photocell system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy) to examine double leg and single leg drop jumps. Thirteen physically active individuals performed 5 double leg drop jumps and 5 single leg drop jumps from a height of 0.3 m. Ground contact time (CT), flight height (FH)...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A method of estimating force using an accelerometer is presented. This model is based on estimating the resultant acceleration of a body at its centre of mass using a tri-axial accelerometer. A data set of ground reaction forces are gathered using a force platform, which is used as the control for this experiment. Signal processing techniques for r...

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Project (1)
Archived project
Muscles are the key drivers in any human movement. Since the muscles generate the forces and consequently the impulses to move the athlete from one position to another, it can be useful to study the muscle activity during sports movements to help with optimisation of technique, injury prevention and performance enhancements. Due to recent advances in electromyography (EMG) technologies, muscle activity in sports movement such as shot putting and overground sprinting can now be acquired using wireless surface mount sensors. Previously the use of tethered devices restricted the movements which could be analysed. The aim of this research was to investigate data analysis methods for use with EMG. There is a need to develop an in depth understanding of what EMG data can convey by understanding muscle activations and patterns in various sports movements and techniques. The research has been implemented by conducting a literature review, a survey and experimental studies to examine EMG signals on shot putting, sprinting and to understand cross-talk. There has been significant work done in understanding the biomechanics of sprinting, with emphasis on kinematics. The literature review on muscle activities in sprinting highlighted the need for wireless devices to allow testing of athletes in ecologically valid environments, rather than on a treadmill which offers little comparison with the environment of the sprinter, and proposed that there existed a bias on the muscles studied which may have been due to technology constraints of tethered systems. The survey of biomechanists gave an insight into the sensor devices utilised, the types of experimental studies being undertaken and the specifications desired in these devices. The study of muscle activations during the glide technique in shot put delivered meaningful activation patterns which coincided with key movements in the technique and augmented previously known kinematic data and anecdotal evidence. The study on muscle activations during maximal sprinting returned similar results, the 50% threshold provided information on the higher volume of muscle activity and these bursts of activity also coincided with key kinematic events. The use of independent component analysis (ICA) was examined to reduce cross-talk during sporting movements and recreating EMG signals due incorrectly positioned electrodes. Few studies have examined ICA with myoelectric signals. This research applies ICA to EMG signals during isometric contractions; small increases in correlation were found in some cases between the output signals and the ideal signals. The data analysis methods used in this research along with the supporting studies may prove to be a vital aid in supporting practitioners, coaches and athletes in the analysis of shot putting and sprinting using muscle activations and patterns. The thresholding methods used in this work may be useful in future studies to distinguish between low and high volumes of EMG activity in sports movements. It is recommended that future studies examine the muscle activity of specific exercises and compare the activity to that of sports movements to determine which exercises are most suitable in training and for pre-activation. The ICA algorithm should be examined further, to analyse isotonic movements.