Roger Jovani

Roger Jovani
Estación Biológica de Doñana · Evolutionary Ecology

PostDoc at Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC)

About

98
Publications
36,058
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2,812
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2017 - present
Estación Biológica de Doñana
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2009 - December 2016
Estación Biológica de Doñana
Position
  • Researcher
April 2007 - October 2009
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (98)
Article
Full-text available
Birds host a vast diversity of feather symbionts of different kingdoms, including animals (e.g., lice, mites), fungi, and bacteria. Feather mites (Acariformes: Astigmata: Analgoidea and Pterolichoidea), the most abundant animal ectosymbionts of birds, are permanent inhabitants of the pterosphere (ptero feather in Greek; Labrador et al. 2020), and t...
Article
Full-text available
Feathers are the habitat of a myriad of organisms, from fungi and bacteria to lice and mites. Although most studies focus on specific taxa and their interaction with the bird host, anecdotal data glimpse feathers as holders of a system with its own ecology, what we call here the stylosphere. A major gap in our knowledge of the stylosphere is the ec...
Article
Passerine moult shows two well‐known although intriguing characteristics: i) a varying subset of wing feathers are retained during certain moult episodes, and ii) the identity of the replaced feathers is not random. However, the rules that underlie these moult features are largely unknown. Non‐randomness could arise under time and energy constraint...
Article
Full-text available
Some symbiont species are highly host-specific, inhabiting only one or a very few host species, and typically have limited dispersal abilities. When they do occur on multiple host species, populations of such symbionts are expected to become genetically structured across these different host species, and this may eventually lead to new symbiont spe...
Article
Passerine wing-feather moult has been studied historically in terms of its intensity, duration, timing and extent. However, little is known about variation of wing-moult phenotypes (i.e. the identity of moulted wing feathers in a given individual) within species, among moult episodes, and in relation to passerine phylogeny. Here we studied 5373 win...
Article
Full-text available
The high relevance of host‐switching for the diversification of highly host‐specific symbionts (i.e., those commonly inhabiting a single host species) demands a better understanding of host‐switching dynamics at an ecological scale. Here we used DNA metabarcoding to study feather mites on passerine birds in Spain, sequencing mtDNA (COI) for 25,540...
Article
Full-text available
Feather mites are among the most common and diverse ectosymbionts of birds, yet basic questions such as the nature of their relationship remain largely unanswered. One reason for feather mites being understudied is that their morphological identification is often virtually impossible when using female or young individuals. Even for adult male speci...
Article
Full-text available
We assembled and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of Trouessartia rubecula, the first feather mite complete mitochondrial genome from the largest feather mite superfamily Analgoidea (ca. 1150 spp). The mitogenome was composed of 13 protein, 17 tRNA, and 2 rRNA-coding genes and was 14,125 bp in length.
Article
Full-text available
The study of cryptic species allows to describe and to understand biodiversity, and the evolutionary processes shaping it. Mites of the family Rhinonyssidae are permanent parasites of the nasal cavities of birds, currently including about 500 described species and 12 genera. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mites from five populations of the gen...
Article
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Parasites and other symbionts are crucial components of ecosystems, regulating host populations and supporting food webs. However, most symbiont systems, especially those involving commensals and mutualists, are relatively poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the nature of the symbiotic relationship between birds and their most ab...
Article
Highly host-specific symbionts are very rarely found except with their typical host species. Although switches to new hosts are rare and difficult to detect, a switch to a host phylogenetically distant from the original one (a ‘major host switch’) could allow diversification of the symbionts onto the new host lineage. The consequences of such major...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parasite conservation is a rapidly growing field at the intersection of ecology, epidemiology, parasitology, and public health. The overwhelming diversity of parasitic life on earth, and recent work showing that parasites and other symbionts face severe extinction risk, necessitates infrastructure for parasite conservation assessments. Here, we des...
Article
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Climate change is a well-documented driver of both wildlife extinction and disease emergence, but the negative impacts of climate change on parasite diversity are undocumented. We compiled the most comprehensive spatially explicit data set available for parasites, projected range shifts in a changing climate, and estimated extinction rates for eigh...
Article
Full-text available
High-throughput DNA barcoding has become essential in ecology and evolution but some technical questions still remain. Increasing the number of PCR cycles above routine 20-30 cycles is a common practice when working with old-type specimens, with little amounts of DNA, or when facing annealing issues with the primers. However, increasing the number...
Article
It can be challenging for organisms to achieve a good match between their phenotypic characteristics and environmental requirements that vary in space and time. The evolution of adaptive phenotypes can result from genetic differentiation at the population level. Individuals, however, could also change their phenotype (adaptive plasticity) or select...
Article
The consequences of symbiont transmission strategies are better understood than their adaptive causes. 2. Feather mites are permanent ectosymbionts of birds assumed to be transmitted mainly vertically from parents to offspring. The transmission of Proctophyllodes doleophyes Gaud (Astigmata, Proctophyllodidae) was studied in two European populations...
Article
Full-text available
Colour patterns (e.g. irregular, spotted or barred forms) are widespread in the animal kingdom, yet their potential role as signals of quality has been mostly neglected. However, a review of the published literature reveals that pattern itself (irrespective of its size or colour intensity) is a promising signal of individual quality across species...
Article
Understanding host–symbiont networks is a major question in evolutionary ecology. Birds host a great diversity of endo- and ectosymbiotic organisms, with feather mites (Arachnida: Acariformes: Analgoidea, Pterolichoidea) being among the most diverse of avian symbionts. A global approach to the ecology and evolution of bird–feather-mite associations...
Article
Full-text available
The reasons for variation in group size among animal species remain poorly understood. Using “Ashmole's halo” hypothesis of food depletion around colonies, we predict that foraging range imposes a ceiling on the maximum colony size of seabird species. We tested this with a phylogenetic comparative study of 43 species of seabirds (28,262 colonies),...
Article
Full-text available
Fault bars are narrow malformations in feathers oriented almost perpendicular to the rachis where the feather vein and even the rachis may break. Breaks in the barbs and barbules result in small pieces of the feather vein being lost, while breaks in the rachis result in loss of the distal portion of the feather. Here, we provide a comprehensive rev...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding what shapes variation in genetic diversity among species remains a major challenge in evolutionary ecology, and it has been seldom studied in parasites and other host-symbiont systems. Here, we studied mtDNA variation in a host-symbiont non-model system: 418 individual feather mites from 17 feather mite species living on 17 different...
Data
Table S1. Sampling details: locality, date of sampling, sample size, samples id, collectors and GenBank accesions.
Data
Figure S1. Log likelihood profile of lambda estimation (here is shown only one iteration calculation. Figure S2–S13. Each colour in pie charts represents an individual bird. Pie size represents haplotype frequency.
Article
Full-text available
Eight subspecies have been proposed within the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco) species. However, recent molecular data have challenged this view, encouraging further work in this species complex. Here we reevaluated the taxonomic status between the North-Western African Tawny Owl, S. a. mauritanica, and its closest Iberian Tawny Owl population (from the S....
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the ecological function of species and the structure of communities is crucial in the study of ecological interactions among species. For this purpose, not only the occurrence of particular species but also their abundance in ecological communities is required. However, abundance quantification of species through morphological charact...
Article
Full-text available
A new feather mite species, Dolichodectes hispanicus sp. n. (Astigmata: Proctophyllodidae), is described from the Melodious Warbler Hippolais polyglotta (Vieillot) (Passeriformes: Acrocephalidae) in Spain. The new species is closest to the type species of the genus, D. edwardsi (Trouessart, 1885) from the Grear Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus arundinaceu...
Article
Populations of species typically considered trophic generalists may include specialised individuals consistently feeding on certain resources. Optimal foraging theory states that individuals should feed on those resources most valuable to them. This, however, may vary according to individual differences in detecting or processing resources, differe...
Article
Feather mites (Astigmata: Analgoidea, Pterolichoidea) are among the most abundantand commonly occurring bird ectosymbionts. Basic questions on the ecology and evolution of feather mites remain unanswered because feather mite species identification is often only possible for adult males and it is laborious even for specialised taxonomists, thus prec...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Gradients of environmental stress may affect biotic interactions in unpredictable ways responding to climate variation, depending on the abiotic stress tolerance of interacting partners. Here, we study the effect of local climate on the intensity of feather mites in six mountain passerines along a 1400 m elevational gradient characterized by shifti...
Article
Full-text available
The relative contribution of personal and social information to explain individual and collective behavior in different species and contexts is an open question in animal ecology. In particular, there is a major lack of studies combining theoretical and empirical approaches to test the relative relevance of different hypothesized individual behavio...
Article
Full-text available
Fault bars are conspicuous malformations on bird feathers that are produced during feather growth. The causes of fault bars are poorly understood. In our study, we used the presence of Campylobacter jejuni infection in 302 urban feral pigeons (Columba livia) as a proxy of physiological stress and correlated this stress with fault bar abundance. The...
Article
An ongoing new synthesis in evolutionary theory is expanding our view of the sources of heritable variation beyond point mutations of fixed phenotypic effects to include environmentally sensitive changes in gene regulation. This expansion of the paradigm is necessary given ample evidence for a heritable ability to alter gene expression in response...
Article
Full-text available
Animal coloration is key in natural and sexual selection, playing signifi-cant roles in intra-and interspecific communication because of its linkage to individual behaviour, genetics and physiology. Simple animal traits such as the area or the colour intensity of homogeneous patches have been profusely studied. More complex patterns are widespread...
Article
Full-text available
Chance per se plays a key role in ecology and evolution, e.g., genetic mutation, resource spatiotemporal unpredictability. In community ecology, chance is recognized as a key factor in community assemblage, but less is known about its role in intraguild processes leading to species coexistence. Here we study the relevance of resource unpredictabili...
Article
Full-text available
Extra pair paternity is widespread in birds, but its high variability across years, populations, and species is to a great extent unre-solved. Here we explored, during 2 breeding seasons, population and individual accessibility to fertile females at different spa-tiotemporal scales in a population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to underst...
Article
Full-text available
Animal collective patterns such as group size frequency distributions often show substantial intraspecific variation, suggesting low species-specific consistency. Here, we dissect intraspecific vs interspecific components of colony size variation to estimate the repeatability (R) of colony size frequency distribution (CSFD) statistics for seabird s...
Article
Full-text available
Feather mites are arthropods that live on or in the feathers on birds, and are among the commonest avian ectosymbionts. However, the nature of the ecological interaction between feather mites and birds remains unclear, some studies reporting negative effects of feather mites on their hosts and others reporting positive or no effects. Here we use a...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to environmental contaminants may result in reduced reproductive success and long-lasting population declines in vertebrates. Emerging data from laboratory studies on model species suggest that certain life-stages, such as development, should be of special concern. However, detailed investigations of long-term consequences of developmental...
Data
Data on reproductive parameters from white storks (Ciconia ciconia) breeding in the study area after the Aznalcóllar mine spill (1999–2005). Bird code identifies individuals. Sex: 1 = males, 2 = females. Age in years. Group: 0 = hatched before the spill, 1 = hatched after the spill. * The exact number of eggs laid could be not determined. (DOC)
Article
Dispersal is an important step in animal's life cycle, one consequence of which is reducing local mate and resource competition. Dispersal is often achieved during one unique special movement, from the birthplace to a new appropriate area where to settle and reproduce. However, in species in which this special movement is limited by life history tr...
Article
Full-text available
Growth bands and fault bars, widespread features of feathers that form during regeneration, have largely been studied independently. Growth bands result from normal regeneration: each pair of dark/light bands forms every 24 h. Fault bars are a response to stress during regeneration, creating a translucent line that can break the feather. We studied...
Article
Full-text available
Protandry, the earlier arrival of males than females to breeding areas, is widespread in birds, but its underlying mechanisms are far from well understood. The two, not mutually exclusive most highly supported hypoth-eses to explain avian protandry postulate that it has evolved from intrasexual male competition to acquire the best territories ("ran...
Article
Male and female European Robins Erithacus rubecula display their red breasts in year‐round territorial contests. Despite the clear signalling role of the red breast, little is known about its sexual dimorphism or trends in size when Robins age. We studied these patterns in resident and migrant Robins in a Mediterranean population. Both male and fem...
Article
Full-text available
Consistent waves of collective vigilance in prey groups using public information about predation risk. Antipredator vigilance models have long assumed that individuals in groups monitor threats independently from one another. This assumption has been challenged recently, both theoretically and empirically. In particular, recent models predict that...
Article
Understanding group size variation is a major challenge in animal ecology. However, we argue that understanding group sizes from an individual point of view (i.e. individual group sizes) and the relationship with population group sizes may be even more important. This may seem redundant, but in the present study we show that it is not. We analysed...
Article
Growth bands are alternate dark/light bands perpendicular to the feather rachis. Previous studies indicate that pairs of dark/light bands are grown every 24h, with light bands being produced at night, and dark ones during the day. Thus, the dark:light width ratio could reflect the photoperiod under which a feather was grown. We tested this hypothes...
Article
Individual variance in lifetime fecundity within populations is a life-history parameter of crucial evolutionary and ecological significance. However, knowledge of its magnitude and underlying mechanisms in natural populations is biased toward short-lived taxa. This paper summarizes results of a 23-year study on a population of the Mediterranean sh...
Article
Fault bars are translucent areas across feathers grown under stressful conditions. They are ubiquitous across avian species and feather tracts. Because fault bars weaken feather structure and can lead to feather breakage, they may reduce flight performance and lower fitness. Therefore, natural selection might prime mechanisms aimed at reducing the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Understanding how information spreads in animal groups is key to understand both the mechanisms underlying grouping patterns and the ultimate reasons of animal group living. Vultures offer a spectacular instance of group foraging - vultures may spend several days without feeding while searching alone or in small groups...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Self-organization theory states that collective patterns can emerge from the massive interaction of many units which behave according to simple rules. This theoretical framework has been applied to understand physical systems such as sand dunes and to animal groups including eusocial ants and bird flocks. The research p...
Article
Full-text available
Butt-end and lock-on aluminum band loss and wear were studied in the White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) banded in Spain. The risk of loss of butt-end bands increased from 0% to 85% in bands of 0 to 12 years. However, no loss occurred when storks were banded on the tibia rather than in the tarsus. Lock-on metal bands showed a low band loss rate throughou...
Article
Explaining the huge variability present in bird colony sizes within and between species is intimately related to the understanding of the proximate and ultimate reasons for bird coloniality. However, natural patterns of colony size frequency distributions (CSFDs) remain poorly known. It is widely believed that colonial birds have similar long-taile...
Article
Full-text available
Why and how birds in colonies often breed in striking synchrony is an unsolved question. In colonies, conspecific birds often destroy eggs and kill chicks, either intentionally or not. We propose that social tranquillity at the time of laying can be achieved if a bird's stress level is partly determined by the agitation of its neighbours. Moreover,...
Article
Full-text available
Departures from power law group size frequency distributions have been proposed as a useful tool to link individual behavior with population patterns and dynamics, although examples are scarce for wild animal populations. We studied a population of Lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni) breeding in groups (colonies) from one to ca. 40 breeding pairs in 1...
Article
Human societies accumulate a great deal of information about past events. People make reference to things that happened in time in different ways and record them in multiple media. We have studied the current use of this information by analysing the frequency of occurrence of numbers associated with years in the World Wide Web (WWW). We found a con...
Article
Full-text available
The spatial distribution of organisms often differs across scales. For instance, colonial bird populations could be described, from large to small scale, as scattered clumps of otherwise regularly distributed breeding pairs. We analysed the distribution of nests of a large colonial population of white storks (Ciconia ciconia) and found a fractal pa...
Article
In 1998, the Aznalcóllar mine tailings dyke in southwestern Spain broke, flooding the Agrio-Guadiamar river system with acid tailings up to the borders of one of the largest breeding colonies of white storks in the western Palearctic, Dehesa de Abajo. Over the following years, a high proportion of nestlings developed leg defects not seen before the...