Roger Jeffery

Roger Jeffery
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · School of Social and Political Science

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123
Publications
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Publications

Publications (123)
Article
Full-text available
Assessing and managing nitrogen sustainably is imperative for achieving the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) targeted for 2030. South Asian countries, aware of the environmental and health impacts of nitrogen pollution, regionally as well as globally, piloted the 2019 UN resolution on Sustainable Nitrogen Management, calling for urgent po...
Article
This paper addresses the question of how the position of Indian states in terms of their approach to welfare state policies interacts with the centre–state relationships that characterize health policymaking. In India’s version of federalism, health policymaking has been influenced by four mutually interacting sources: international public health d...
Article
South Asian regional cooperation with the International Nitrogen Initiative and the India-led UN Resolution on Sustainable Nitrogen Management (UNEP/EA.4/L.16) brought South Asia into global focus. Here, we reflect upon its proactive scientific community, growing scientific capacity, and international collaborations, which have enabled the emergenc...
Article
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Writing reflects some of the different characteristics of the language being used and of the people who are communicating. The present paper focusses on the internal written communication in international and inter-disciplinary research projects. Using a case study of an international public health research project, it argues that the authorship an...
Article
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In 2005 India changed its pharmaceutical and innovation policy that facilitated a dramatic increase in international clinical trials involving study sites in India. This policy shift was surrounded by controversies; civil society organisations (CSOs) criticised the Indian government for promoting the commercialisation of pharmaceutical research and...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the evidence about the scale and significance of clinical trials in India. After describing some of the new social forms that service these trials it assesses the growth in their number from 2005 to 2012 and the reasons for—and implications of—a decline since then. The main argument is that the nascent Indian clinical trials in...
Book
Popular Western images of Indian women range from submissive brides behind their veils to the powerful, active women of Indian politics. In this lively and unique book, Patricia and Roger Jeffery present a different perspective on women’s lives. Focusing on the mundane rather than the exotic, they explore the complex interplay between the power of...
Technical Report
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A report on the potential to develop digital citizenship in Pakistan.
Article
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Background Good drug regulation requires an effective system for monitoring and inspection of manufacturing and sales units. In India, despite widespread agreement on this principle, ongoing shortages of drug inspectors have been identified by national committees since 1975. The growth of India’s pharmaceutical industry and its large export market...
Book
Full-text available
The premise of democratic politics is that all citizens are equal and have an equal right to a say in national politics. This definition of democracy, however, is observed far more in the breach than in practice. Muslims, Dalits and Adivasis continue their struggle to seek entry into the institution from which they seem to be barred. Drawing on in-...
Article
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Perspectives on India’s Social Development - Bhagwati Jagdish and Panagariya Arvind, Why Growth Matters: How Economic Growth in India Reduced Poverty and the Lessons for Other Developing Countries (New York, PublicAffairs, 2013) Drèze Jean and Sen Amartya, An Uncertain Glory: India and its contradictions (Princeton/London, Princeton University Pres...
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Chronic diseases are now the leading cause of death and disability worldwide; this epidemic has been linked to rapid economic growth and urbanisation in developing countries. Understanding how characteristics of the physical, social, and economic environment affect behaviour in the light of these changes is key to identifying successful interventio...
Article
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The World Trade Organisation's Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights [TRIPS] agreement aimed to harmonise intellectual property rights and patent protection globally. In India, the signing of this agreement resulted in a sharp increase in clinical trials since 2005. The Indian government, along with larger Indian pharmaceutical companies, beli...
Article
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Background Front-line health providers have a unique role as brokers (patient advocates) between the health system and patients in ensuring access to medicines (ATM). ATM is a fundamental component of health systems. This paper examines in a South African context supply- and demand- ATM barriers from the provider perspective using a five dimensiona...
Article
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The challenges of ensuring equity among partners of very different academic power and status, across continents, within complex research projects involving differing disciplines with their own norms, and balancing needs for capacity development of individuals and for institutions can be major sources of conflicts. While each of these concerns has b...
Chapter
This essay is based on Jeffrey's research on the health care systems in India since the 1970s. Since then India's health services have been transformed in many respects, while also retaining many of its earlier features. Health systems are not immune from global pressures and opportunities, and over this period, India's development strategies, econ...
Article
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The 2011 Census results on the sex composition of the Indian population have so far been discussed within the prevailing understanding of the reasons behind a declining child sex ratio The use of prenatal diagnostic techniques followed by sex-selective abortion, female child neglect and female infanticide. This article questions aspects of this exp...
Article
Transitions to adulthood are usually defined by markers such as leaving school, starting a first job, leaving the parental home, forming a first union, marrying and having a first child. Youth policy remains strongly influenced by these linear transitions, and by the metaphor of a ‘pathway’ from school to work and adulthood, taking little account o...
Article
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Enhanced young women's reproductive agency could contribute to much-needed improvements in reproductive and child health in Pakistan. The RECOUP programme of research was designed to unpack the channels through which schooling might contribute to such an enhancement for young mothers in the two provinces of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Key decisi...
Chapter
And it is also written in the Qur'a¯n Sari¯f, these are the words of the pa¯k Qur'a¯n: "Ta¯li¯mul Qur'a¯n ta'a¯lam, Ala¯mul Qur'a¯n ta'a¯lam." Its meaning is that whoever has read the Qur'a¯n Sari¯f themselves, they should certainly teach it to others. You also obtain s?ava¯b [reward] from teaching. You will receive as much neki¯ [reward for virtue...
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In India, the last few years have seen an increase in the school enrolment rates of children with disabilities; however, there are continuing concerns about the outcomes of these efforts, especially in terms of employment. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative enquiry into how young people (aged 15–30 years) with various impairments (na...
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During the 2000s, confirmed polio cases in India have been increasingly localised in Uttar Pradesh (UP) and Bihar, especially amongst Muslim children. Muslims have also been at the sharp end of the Pulse Polio Initiative (PPI) and the associated ‘Underserved Strategy’ designed to counter civilian resistance to the programme. Our critique of the PPI...
Article
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Building appropriate levels of trust in pharmaceuticals is a painstaking and challenging task, involving participants from different spheres of life, including producers, distributors, retailers, prescribers, patients and the mass media. Increasingly, however, trust is not just a national matter, but involves cross-border flows of knowledge, threat...
Article
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This paper uses a close reading of villagers' responses to the death in childbirth of a Muslim woman to raise questions about India's current policy emphasis on institutional delivery as a means of reducing maternal mortality. After introducing the context and methods of our research, we describe recent policy interventions related to maternal heal...
Article
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India's economy has been transformed since the early 1990s by a globalisation/liberalisation project that can seem to be in conflict with social goals, such as the reduction of the enduringly high levels of mortality and morbidity in states such as Uttar Pradesh (UP). Focusing on aspects of reproductive and child health (obstetric care, family plan...
Article
This chapter introduces the economic, social, and political aspects of Indian modernities. It considers the question of uneven modernisation and studies the sphere of politics. The Indian economy and reform is discussed in detail as well.
Article
India has continued to report cases of wild poliovirus and acute flaccid paralysis throughout the 2000s. Indeed, in 2009 the numbers of both exceeded the totals for 2008, by 26% and 9.5%, respectively. Confirmed wild poliovirus cases are increasingly concentrated amongst Muslim children and localised in western Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. The Pulse Po...
Article
This is a country where the poor fear tuberculosis, which kills 1,000 Indians a day, but people like me—middle-class people with access to health services that are probably better than England's—don't fear it at all. It's an unglamorous disease, like so much of the things that the poor of India endure (Adiga in Jefferies 2008).
Article
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In 2001, it is estimated that 270 million Indians belonged in the 12-24 years age group. While attention is being focused on these young people's potential for social transformation, some of them - such as those with disabilities - remain alienated from mainstream debates on development. It may be estimated that there are somewhere between 5 and 5....
Article
This paper uses recent field research to challenge the widely held view that a “Dalit revolution” is occurring in North India. Drawing on two years' ethnographic research in a village in western Uttar Pradesh, the authors uncover the growing importance of a generation of local political activists among Dalits (former untouchables) while also showin...
Article
This paper explores the cultural and economic strategies of educated but un/under‐employed young Muslim men aged between 20 and 34 in a village in western Uttar Pradesh, north India. Drawing on Connell's gender theory, the paper demonstrates how economic and political forces shape Muslim young men's strategies. The paper distinguishes between ‘scho...
Article
Citizenship rights in India are being transformed under economic liberalisation. In this article, we use obstetric crises to provide an entry point to explore recent changes in people's access to health care and their understandings of their civic rights and entitlements. We draw on our research in rural Bijnor district (Uttar Pradesh) be...
Article
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Disability status is often transitory or a matter of insidious change. A person's ability to function properly depends to a considerable extent on her/his social and physical environment. One area that slips through the large-scale studies like the census and National Sample Survey is the impact of the state and the market on the lives of people wi...
Article
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In South Asia, Muslim reformers have often attempted to ‘rationalize’ and gentrify the everyday behaviour of ordinary Muslims. Yet, despite the existence of discussions of contraceptive techniques in the yūnān-ī tibb curricula of 19th century India and the apparent affinity between rationalism and fertility regulation, contraception was rarely disc...
Technical Report
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Exactly how schooling affects young women’s ‘autonomy’, especially with respect to her fertility and the life-chances of her children, is a contested issue. We draw on semi-structured interviews with young married women with at least one child under the age of six, in urban and rural areas of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, north India, to elaborate...
Article
Intrapartum use of oxytocin should entail controlled dosages administered through infusion, continual monitoring of mother and fetus and surgical back-up, since several adverse outcomes have been reported. However, in Uttar Pradesh, north India, small-scale ethnographic studies as well as a large-scale retrospective survey have established that unm...
Article
In India in 2000 between 115000 and 170000 women died in childbirth-about one-quarter of all maternal deaths worldwide. Far from declining over the 1990s maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates in India have at best plateaued at worst increased. Regional class and caste inequalities remain far too high. The Millennium Development Goal f...
Article
Full-text available
Intrapartum use of oxytocin should entail controlled dosages administered through infusion, continual monitoring of mother and fetus and surgical back-up, since several adverse outcomes have been reported. However, in Uttar Pradesh, north India, small-scale ethnographic studies as well as a large-scale retrospective survey have established that unm...
Article
This article examines the role of school education in reproducing caste and class inequalities in rural Bijnor district, Uttar Pradesh, India. Drawing on Bourdieu’s work, the article shows that a rural elite has used its superior wealth, connections, and social status to ensure that their sons receive privileged access to schooling credentials and...
Article
Scholarly discussions of formal education in the global South are increasingly moving away from a narrow focus on human capital to consider the meanings that people attach to ‘being educated’. This article advances current debates on the social construction of educational value in South Asia by examining how educated Chamar (Dalit) young...
Article
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'Saffron Demography' has been instrumental in perpetuating myths relating to claimed differences between Hindu and Muslim populations. This paper examines this by now 'common wisdom' in the light of contemporary demographic reality in India. Based on extensive research in a western Uttar Pradesh district, it argues that the scale of Hindu-Muslim de...
Article
Drawing on fourteen months' ethnographic field research in western Uttar Pradesh among educated Dalit (ex-untouchable) and Muslim young men, this article uncovers a crisis in educated people's access to salaried employment in rural north India. Against the grain of other studies of youth underemployment in postcolonial settings, we argue that educa...
Article
Abstract This article considers the capacity of formal education to undermine established processes of caste and class reproduction in an area of north India, with particular reference to the views and strategies of educated Dalit young men. It draws on quantitative and qualitative research conducted by the authors in a village in Bijnor district,...
Article
Girls' education has been enduringly controversial in north India, and the disputes of the second half of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century still echo in debates about girls' education in contemporary India. In this paper, we reflect on the education of rural Muslim girls in contemporary western Uttar Pradesh (UP), by examining...
Article
This paper describes and criticizes myths about the scale and causes of fertility differentials between Hindus and Muslims in India. These ideas, associated with Hindu nationalist organizations, also have a more general common-sense quality. The paper challenges these views by examining how demographers have addressed Hindu–Muslim fertility differe...
Book
Over the past one hundred years in particular, there has been a steady process by which natural resources (such as ground-water, forests, fishing grounds and grazing land) have been increasingly managed by centralised institutions. Governments and other national agencies have argued that this promotes efficiency, equity, and other wide national goa...
Book
Attempts to manage natural resources through collaboration rather than competition, by agreements rather than conflict, have become the touchstone for many who see these efforts as the harbinger of global sustainable development. The received wisdom suggests that participatory natural resource management projects work because traditional knowledge...
Article
In our critique of a recent article by Sudha Pai (CIS vol. 34, no. 2) we argue that she provides inadequate evidence to support her case that there has been a dramatic change in dominance relationships in western UP. We identify problems of evidence in her claims about the significance of rising education of Chamars, and in the consequences of the...
Article
This paper addresses the micro‐politics of filmmaking and is based on the authors’ experiences as academic consultants for an Open University film shot in two north Indian villages where the authors have worked since 1982. The consultant role entailed providing academic inputs, but also highlighted several uncomfortable issues. As members of the fi...
Article
The recent contribution by Moulasha and Rama Rao (1999) to the debate on the relationships between religion, fertility and family planning, uses National Family Health Survey data in misleading ways. By failing to consider regional patterns in the distribution of Hindus and Muslims they exaggerate the role of religious group membership in understan...
Article
BOOK REVIEWS- SOUTH ASIA is a lack of specificity of where the informacion comes from, for example, which region, which village, which fescival, etc. However, chis is not crue of the latter three chapters, Tamil Nadu: Guardians of Boundaries, Uctar Pradesh: Gifts of Elephants, and Orissa: Temples forTulasi, which focus on detailed case studies of t...

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