Roger Brooke

Roger Brooke
Duquesne University · Department of Psychology

Ph. D.

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23
Publications
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135
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Introduction
Roger Brooke is Professor of Psychology at Duquesne University, where he is also the Director of the Military Psychological Services. He is Board Certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Psychology and licensed in Pennsylvania. His has published in the fields of phenomenology, analytical (Jungian) psychology, psychological assessment, and psychotherapy. Recent work has focused on an archetypal approach to framing combat posttraumatic stress disorder helping those suffering from this wound to the soul. Current research is on using a modified version of Jung's active imagination to put combat nightmares to sleep.

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Jung's dreams about Africa reveal the Whiteness and colonialist assumptions typical of the twentieth century educated European. Jung's visits to Africa and New Mexico, and his dreams are critically discussed, showing how, even decades later, Jung failed to use his own theory of dreaming with regard to his own dreams. The compensatory function of hi...
Book
This volume, edited by three leading proponents and practitioners of human science psychology, advocates a perspective rooted in human experience to discuss issues such as empathy, cultural history, apartheid, sexual assault, fetishes, and our natural environment.
Article
Full-text available
Interiority and any reference to an inner life have been radically deconstructed by the philosophical anthropologists, who find in the psychological constructions of the self and the theories of mental life the legacy of Descartes and Galileo. This critique is argued in some detail. However, the language of interiority is not merely an epistemologi...
Article
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This paper takes as its starting point Jung's definition of the self as the totality of the psyche. However, because the term psyche remains conceptually unclear the concept of the self as totality, origin and goal, even centre, remains vague. With reference to Heidegger's analysis of human being as Dasein, as well as Jung's writings, it is argued...
Article
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Taking a position informed by postcolonial thought, it is argued that Jung's concept of individuation, with its emphasis on separateness and the withdrawal of projections, is essentially modern and Western. Any group of people is regarded by Jung only as a regressive threat to the individuation process. Jung's European colonialism is evident in his...
Article
Full-text available
For a skilful psychotherapist clinical hunches may be finely differentiated and reliable, yet the evidence on which they are based tends to remain pre-articulate. The aim of this paper is to discuss this evidence and to organise it in terms of structural considerations regarding the cohesiveness of the self. The prognostic significance of these con...
Article
It is argued that responsibility for academia's disdain for Jungian psychology needs to be accepted by the Jungian community to the extent that it remains unrelated to contemporary literature, academic concerns and modes of enquiry in the social sciences. Several illustrative examples are presented. Of special concern is that the most powerful mark...
Article
Full-text available
A humanistic sensibility in contemporary geropsychology is thematized and encouraged. Dementia, in which the brain loses its world‐gathering and functional capacities, is described phenomenologically as a disintegration of being‐in‐the‐world. The humanistic perspective encourages the discipline to approach the question of diagnosis holistically, es...
Article
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In an attempt to fill the gap left by the widespread rejection of Freud's quasi-physiological metapsychology, the unconsciousness which Freud encountered is rearticulated in existential-phenomenological terms. It is argued that psychoanalysis and phenomenology converge in their attempt to understand the latent but operative meanings that structure...
Article
Full-text available
This summary is offered as a psychological definition of being-guilty. Guilt is lived pre-reflectively in a context of real or imaginary accusatory others, and is constituted as a person accepts responsibility for damaged world-relationships whose meanings constitute shared and personally appropriated values. The contradiction between valued and da...

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Projects (3)
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