Rodrigo Silva

Rodrigo Silva
MARE - Centre of Marine and Environmental Sciences · MARE-Madeira

About

27
Publications
1,989
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Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Current trends in the global climate facilitate the displacement of numerous marine species from their native distribution ranges to higher latitudes when facing warming conditions. In this work, we analyzed occurrences of a circumtropical reef fish, the spotfin burrfish, Chilomycterus reticulatus (Linnaeus, 1958), in the Madeira Archipelago (NE At...
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgal forests play a key role in shallow temperate rocky reefs worldwide, supporting communities with high productivity and providing several ecosystem services. Sea urchin grazing has been increasingly influencing spatial and temporal variation in algae distributions and it has become the main cause for the loss of these habitats in many coas...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive engineering species impact local biodiversity and ecosystem services as they often change habitat complexity while displacing native species, ultimately altering fundamental processes such as secondary production and the energy flow through trophic levels. The sun corals Tubastraea coccinea and T. tagusensis have successfully invaded reef...
Article
The rapid expansion of the invasive coral, Tubastraea spp., along the coast of Brazil is considered a serious problem with major ecological and socio-economic impacts. However, studies on the structure and dynamics of the food web associated to this coral, are still missing. At the basis of this coral another non-indigenous species is very often fo...
Article
Full-text available
Background In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter ≥ 50 mm) seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in thi...
Article
Full-text available
In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter≥50 mm) seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in this study, we c...
Data
PERMANOVA on the percentage cover of conspicuous algae Results of PERMANOVA analysis on square root transformed data. P-values were obtained using 9999 Monte Carlo samples from the asymptotic permutation distribution. Significant results are in bold.
Data
Population structure plots displayed in previous studies Size-frequency distribution (%) of sea urchin populations at (A) Su Pallosu Bay (Guala et al., 2006), and (B) Tavolara—Punta Coda Cavallo (Guala, Simeone & Baroli, 2009).
Data
Dataset used for GSI analysis This dataset shows all the sea urchin samples (of the three size classes examined) used for GSI analysis. TD, Test Diameter (mm); TW, Total Wet Weight (g); GW, Gonad Wet Weight (g); GSI, Gonadosomatic Index.
Data
nMDS plot of algal cover Non-metric MDS plot of algal cover for all replicate quadrats. White plots, high-pressure zone (Su Pallosu Bay); black plots, low-pressure zone (Tavolara—Punta Coda Cavallo); triangles, July ’13; squares, January ’14; circles, May ’14.
Data
Seasonal SST pattern Mean values (±standard deviation) of water temperature (SST) registered from June 2013 to May 2014. Squares, high-pressure zone (Su Pallosu Bay); circles, low-pressure zone (Tavolara –Punta Coda Cavallo).
Data
Growth curves plot displayed in previous studies Comparison of growth rate between the populations living in the zones examined. The growth rates were compared using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. P-value = 0.31 (n.s.). Modified from Loi et al. (2013). Dotted line, Sinis; continuous line, Tavolara—Punta Coda Cavallo.
Data
GSI charts displayed in previous studies GSI trend of sea urchin population at (A) a location (Seu) in the Sinis peninsula, contiguous to Su Pallosu Bay (Baroli et al., 2006), and (B) Tavolara—Punta Coda Cavallo (Guala, Simeone & Baroli, 2009).
Data
Dataset of fertility tests’ results This dataset shows the number of fertilized/not fertilized eggs counted, the percentage of the effectively fertilized eggs, the number of echinoplutei counted and the percentage of achievement of the first larval stage.
Data
Dataset of water temperature values This dataset contains the SST values registered at both zones during the surveyed year. NaN, no data.
Data
Results of fertility tests Mean percentage (±standard deviation) of fertilized eggs and four-arm echinoplutei obtained from tests of fertility performed on US individuals from both sampling zones during the months of maximum gonadal development. na, no count of larvae was done.
Data
Dataset of percentage cover evaluated for conspicuous algal taxa or morphological groups This dataset contains the percentage cover values of algal groups, which were evaluated to assess eventual temporal changes between zones.
Article
Full-text available
Habitat structure plays an important mediating role in predator-prey interactions. However the effects are strongly dependent on regional predator pools, which can drive predation risk in habitats with very similar structure in opposite directions. In the Mediterranean Sea predation on juvenile sea urchins is commonly known to be regulated by seagr...
Data
Benthic predators’ distribution. Average abundance (n = 3) of Hexaplex trunculus individuals found in the fishing cages placed in the continuous meadow, patchy meadow and rocks. (TIFF)
Data
Work authorization and copyright. (PDF)
Data
Landscape square example. Each square (35 × 35 m2 landscape area) was divided in 49 cells. The sampling unit corresponds to a cell of 5 × 5 m2. Contiguous group of cells of the same class of habitat represents a patch. (TIFF)
Preprint
Full-text available
Background. In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter ≥ 50 mm) seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background. In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter ≥ 50 mm) seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in th...

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Project (1)
Project
The orange cup coral, Tubastraea coccinea, has been recognized as an invasive species, rapidly colonizing coastal environments from Florida to Brazil. The high rates of recruitment, high larval dispersion, high growth rates, early maturation and great ecological tolerance, have made this a cosmopolitan species. It has a potential to invade new areas and increase its current range in Brazilian coastal waters. Moreover, it produces deleterious effects on the most abundant native coral, Mussismilia hispida, which is an endemic species. Although T. coccinea has been the focus of many recent studies, there is no information on how it will respond to the temperature increase predicted to occur due to global warming. The present proposal aims to compare the responses of T. coccinea and M. hispida to higher temperatures caused by climate warming, through experimental assays in a controlled environment. Low temperatures will also be tested, to assess its invasive potential beyond the tropics, as well as its resilience to extreme cold events, also more probable in the future due to the increase in climate variability predicted by climate change models. The effect of temperature on the ability of T. coccinea and M. hispida to reproduce sexually and assexually will be investigated, through experimental tests in captivity. The water temperatures chosen to investigate responses to future climate warming will be: 26˚C (control = mean summer temperature), 29˚C (+3˚C than the mean summer temperature), 32˚C (+6˚C than the mean summer temperature). To investigate extreme cold events, the water temperatures tested will be: 18˚C (temperature reached during cold waves) and 15˚C (minimum temperature registered). These are reference temperatures for the littoral coast of São Paulo, at an approximate latitude of 23˚49’S, where corals will be collected from nature. To investigate sexual reproduction, (i) propagule release rate, (ii) duration of the larval phase, (iii) larval survival, and (iv) settlement rate will be tested. In order to test the ability of the two coral species to reproduce asexually, growth rates of fragments will be investigated, in captivity, isolated from each other, and side by side. Regeneration time of experimentally inflicted wounds will also be investigated. The overall aim of this proposal is to assess the consequences for the future invasive ability of T. coccinea and competition potential with the native M. hispida. This will lead to the production of two communications in international scientific meetings, one in a national meeting and at least three articles, which will contribute to a more informed management of coastal areas in Brazil and in other parts of the world.