Rodney van der Ree

Rodney van der Ree
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

PhD

About

135
Publications
52,528
Reads
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4,130
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2003 - April 2017
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (135)
Article
The success of urban forest management strategies is dependent on public support for and engagement with urban trees. Satisfaction with urban trees and their management, and the level of trust people have in urban tree managers, are useful for understanding public opinions. Yet these concepts, and the mechanisms leading to the formation of public o...
Conference Paper
Urban trees are recognized as critical for biodiversity, health, well-being, and climate-adaptation. As trees age and increase in size, they provide more significant benefits, such as cooling and shade. While many cities have ambitious plans to increase tree numbers and canopy cover, cities also struggle to maintain and increase tree numbers. This...
Article
Constructing hollows or cavities in trees with chainsaws is an emerging approach to manage hollow-dependent species in hollow depleted landscapes. Small-scale experiments are required to refine this approach before implementing on a broad scale. We addressed two questions: i) are chainsaw hollows used by the regionally threatened brush-tailed phasc...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Executive Summary: Urban street trees are recognised as being important to people and wildlife in Ballarat, but not a lot is known about how trees contribute to social and biodiversity benefits. To help fill this gap, a research group led by the University of Melbourne has partnered with the City of Ballarat to quantify the social and ecological...
Article
Fur properties play a critical role in the thermoregulation of mammals and are becoming of particular interest as the frequency, intensity, and duration of extreme heat events are increasing under climate change. Australian flying-foxes are known to experience mass die-offs during extreme heat events, yet little is known about how different fur pro...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic disturbances (i.e. pollution, light, noise, and vibrations) often extend into the area surrounding a road creating a 'road-effect zone'. Habitat within the road-effect zone is degraded or, in severe cases, completely unsuitable for wildlife, resulting in indirect habitat loss. This can have a disproportionate impact on wildlife in highly mo...
Article
Full-text available
Decisions about urban forests are critical to urban liveability and resilience. This study aimed to evaluate the range of positions held by urban forest managers from local governments in the state of Victoria, Australia, regarding the management and governance challenges that affect their decision-making. This study was based on a Q-method approac...
Article
In an attempt to improve cost-effectiveness, it has become increasingly popular to adapt wildlife crossing structures to enable people to also use them for safe passage across roads. However, the required needs of humans and wildlife may conflict, resulting in a structure that does not actually provide the perceived improvement in cost-effectivenes...
Conference Paper
Peri-urban dynamics are challenging the sustainability of Australian cities. Peri-urban areas represent transition points of planning regimes and governance structures and processes between urban and rural spaces, usually characterized by intensified growth patterns and fast expansion of urban physical elements. These dynamics challenge the impleme...
Article
Full-text available
Nocturnal arthropods form the prey base for many predators and are an integral part of complex food webs. However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms influencing invertebrates at urban water bodies and the potential flow-on effects to their predators. This study aims to: (i) understand the importance of standing water bodies for noctu...
Article
Awareness of the benefits of urban trees has led many cities to develop ambitious targets to increase tree numbers and canopy cover. Policy instruments that guide the planning of cities recognize the need for new governance arrangements to implement this agenda. Urban forests are greatly influenced by the decisions of municipal managers, but there...
Article
Many cities face a struggle to reconcile ambitious tree canopy cover targets with urban development pressures. Canopy cover in The City of Melbourne, Australia, which has a target of 40% canopy cover on public land by 2040, was analysed together with individual tree removal data, with particular focus on how many street trees were removed near majo...
Article
Full-text available
Across Africa, transport infrastructure, including roads, is being built in over 30 planned development corridors that are likely to have major impacts on remaining natural habitats and associated biodiversity. Linked to this is the projected increase in human population size, which is predicted to grow by 1.3 billion people by 2050. Road ecology i...
Conference Paper
Many Australian cities have ambitious targets to increase tree numbers and canopy cover, but they also remove many urban trees every year. This is because many large, old trees pose a hazard to human safety and hinder construction activities, and hence are often removed. However, the services that trees provide are more significant as trees age and...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of species’ population trends is crucial when planning for conservation and management; however, this information can be difficult to obtain for extremely mobile species such as flying-foxes (Pteropus spp.; Chiroptera, Pteropodidae). In mainland Australia, flying-foxes are of particular management concern due their involvement in human-wi...
Article
Full-text available
Roads and traffic may be contributing to global declines of insect populations. The ecological effects of roads often extend far into the surrounding habitat, over a distance known as the road‐effect zone. The quality of habitat in the road‐effect zone is generally degraded (e.g., due to edge effects, noise, light, and chemical pollution) and can b...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study provides an overview of the initial observations into the usefulness of chainsaw hollows for conserving the Brush-tailed Phascogale in the modified forests of central Victoria. In early 2018, thirty seven chainsaw cavities were installed across eight study sites in central Victoria. Nest boxes constructed to the same internal dimensions...
Article
Full-text available
Cities tend to be built in areas of high biodiversity, and the accelerating pace of urbanization threatens the persistence of many species and ecological communities globally. However, urban environments also offer unique prospects for biological conservation, with multiple benefits for humans and other species. We present seven ecological principl...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 20 years, there has been a notable increase in the presence of flying-foxes (Pteropodidae) in urban areas in Australia. Flying-foxes congregate during the day in camps which at times may contain many thousands of individuals. The associated noise, smell, mess and concerns about disease transmission can result in significant conflict w...
Poster
Full-text available
A pilot study using rope between trees to determine if Phascogale would utilise this material. Future research will be conducted materials preferred by Phascogale for development of rope bridges.
Article
Understanding wildlife-vehicle collision risk is critical to mitigating its negative impacts on wildlife conservation, human health and economy. Research often focuses on collisions between wildlife and road vehicles, but collision risk factors for other types of vehicles, less examined in the literature, may also be informative. We studied spatial...
Article
Context: Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are revolutionising areas of animal behaviour research and are advantageous based on their ability to be deployed remotely and unobtrusively, for long time periods in inaccessible areas. Aims: We aimed to determine the feasibility of using a WSN to track detailed movement paths of small animals, e.g. rats (R...
Article
Optimal wildlife survey techniques should maximise detectability or capture rates of target species and minimise potential harm to animals. We compared the effectiveness of Elliott and PVC pipe traps for the capture of small arboreal mammals in the Victorian Central Highlands and found that pipe traps were less effective at capturing small arboreal...
Article
Roads can form barriers to movement for many species, and may reduce the ability of individuals to access foraging and breeding habitat. The impacts of roads on terrestrial fauna has been well studied, however little is known of the impact of roads on insectivorous bats. Wildlife crossing structures (e.g. fauna underpasses) may reduce the barrier i...
Article
Millions of dollars are spent on wildlife crossing structures intended to reduce the barrier effects of roads on wildlife. However, we know little about the degree to which these structures facilitate dispersal and gene flow. Our study incorporates two elements that are rarely used in the evaluation of wildlife crossing structures: an experimental...
Article
Managing and restoring connectivity that enables wildlife movement through landscapes is the primary approach to reduce harmful effects of habitat loss and fragmentation. Improved connectivity is also increasingly invoked as a strategy to mitigate negative impacts of climate change by enabling species to track preferred environments and maintain ev...
Article
11 We review eight years of monitoring data to quantify the number of predation attempts on 12 arboreal marsupials using canopy bridges and glider poles across a major road in southeast 13 Australia. We recorded 13,488 detections of arboreal marsupials on the structures, yet only 14 a single (and unsuccessful) predation attempt was recorded. 15
Article
Full-text available
Road traffic kills hundreds of millions of animals every year, posing a critical threat to the populations of many species. To address this problem there are more than forty types of road mitigation measures available that aim to reduce wildlife mortality on roads (road-kill). For road planners, deciding on what mitigation method to use has been pr...
Data
Figure S2. Predicted relative likelihood of grey kangaroo presence across Australia.
Data
Figure S1. Effects of predictors on relative likelihood of grey kangaroo occurrence.
Data
Figure S3. Effects of predictor variables on traffic volume and speed.
Article
Full-text available
Collisions of vehicles with wildlife kill and injure animals and are also a risk to vehicle occupants, but preventing these collisions is challenging. Surveys to identify problem areas are expensive and logistically difficult. Computer modeling has identified correlates of collisions, yet these can be difficult for managers to interpret in a way th...
Article
Preferences for landscapes are critical because they can drive landscape changes over time. The mediating role of wildlife value orientations in influencing preferences for urban wetlands through the provision of ecological information (based on insectivorous bats) was experimentally tested. Residents (N = 198) were asked about their preferences fo...
Data
Table S1. Landscape‐scale measures of urbanization. Table S2. The number of calls from insectivorous bats recorded at 93 sites (58 wetlands and 35 non‐wetland habitat sites). Table S3. Model selection results for landscape and wetland models.
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa,...
Article
Full-text available
Roadkill (the mortality of animals through wildlife–vehicle collisions) is one of the main impacts of roads on wildlife. Studies quantifying the location and rate of roadkill to identify ‘hot spots’ are often used to guide the location of mitigation efforts, such as fencing or wildlife crossing structures. However, sometimes quantifying rates of ro...
Article
Full-text available
1.Debates about “land-sparing” and “land-sharing” strategies for conserving biodiversity in cities provide an overly simplistic characterization of alternative planning options. Increased urbanization manifests in a number of ways and sophisticated analyses of how species respond to urban environments are required before generalizations about the r...
Research
Full-text available
Conservation at the cross-roads: how roads and other linear infrastructure influence conservation symposium at the International Congress of Conservation Biology and the European Congress of Conservation Biology 6th August 2015.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Considerable resources are spent on habitat restoration across the globe to counter the impacts of habitat loss and degradation on wildlife populations. But, because of time and resourcing constraints on many conservation programs, the effectiveness of these habitat restoration programs in achieving their long-term goals of improving t...
Chapter
Large herbivores occur around the world and are often in conflict with roads and vehicles. Large herbivores are plant eaters and are generally hooved (e.g. deer, moose, elephant and buffalo) but also include kangaroos. All play important roles in ecosystem functioning. These are the animals typically involved in most reported wildlife-vehicle colli...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Wildlife crossing structures are installed to mitigate the impacts of roads on animal populations, yet little is known about some aspects of their success. Many studies have monitored the use of structures by wildlife, but studies that also incorporate individual identification methods can offer additional insights into their effectiveness...
Article
Full-text available
An experimental approach to road mitigation that maximizes inferential power is essential to ensure that mitigation is both ecologically-effective and cost-effective. Here, we set out the need for and standards of using an experimental approach to road mitigation, in order to improve knowledge of the influence of mitigation measures on wildlife pop...
Article
Full-text available
The successful movement of individuals is fundamental to life. Facilitating these movements by promoting ecological connectivity has become a central theme in ecology and conservation. Urban areas contain more than half of the world's population, and their potential to support biodiversity and to connect their citizens to nature is increasingly rec...
Chapter
Arboreal animals need trees for some or all of their shelter, food and movement. This diverse group of wildlife includes mammals, amphibians and reptiles that climb, crawl and glide in trees. Since trees are a critical resource, arboreal animals are directly affected by habitat loss from road construction. The susceptibility of arboreal animals to...
Chapter
Scientifically rigorous research that produces accurate information is required to identify and mitigate the negative impacts of roads and traffic on wildlife, communities and ecosystems. The current approach to road planning and construction is not conducive to doing good science or incorporating explicit learning in the road development process....
Chapter
Full-text available
Wildlife crossing structures help animals cross safely under or over roads or other linear infrastructure and hence play an important role in the conservation of biodiversity. Measuring the rate of use by wildlife is an important first step in almost every evaluation of wildlife crossing structures. Unfortunately, the majority of studies of the use...
Chapter
Identify and describe the target species and goals of mitigation.2Monitor target species that are likely to demonstrate statistically significant effects with comparatively little sampling effort in space and/or time.3Select parameters of interest that are most closely related to the outcome of real concern.4Adopt a study design that allows for rig...
Chapter
There is growing pressure to build crossing structures that facilitate the movement of both people and wildlife across roads. In this chapter, we focus primarily on recreational co‐use of wildlife crossing structures, specifically hikers, runners, cyclists and horse riders. This pressure to install co‐use structures is most apparent in and around c...
Chapter
The structure and composition of roadside vegetation vary from frequently mown grass to shrubs and trees and from artificial landscaping to natural plant communities. Roadside vegetation can perform many important functions, including the provision of habitat for rare plants and animals, a source of seeds for adjacent landscapes, a buffer to reduce...
Chapter
Full-text available
Roads present an unnatural and confusing environment for wildlife and humans alike. Wildlife reflectors and auditory deterrents aim to modify the behaviour of wildlife on or adjacent to the road. Reflectors are designed to redirect the light from oncoming vehicles into the adjacent verge, while auditory deterrents are designed to cause pain, irrita...
Chapter
Roads are built by a team of people from a range of disciplines who must collaborate to ensure the road is built within budget, on time and to the highest possible standards with the least environmental impact. Ecologists, and especially those with expertise on the species of concern likely to be impacted by the proposed road, must be involved in t...
Chapter
Full-text available
Urban areas are unique ecosystems with many distinctly human-centric features not found in other environments; both humans and animals of urban environments must be able to habituate and adapt to many novel influences. Such adaptation includes learning to cope with roads and traffic, which are found in high densities in cities and towns. Perhaps un...
Chapter
Full-text available
The temperate grasslands of Central Asia are habitat for a number of wide-ranging and endangered species such as Mongolian gazelle, saiga antelope, black-tailed gazelle and Asiatic wild ass. These species' habitat covers hundreds of thousands of square kilometres of largely ecologically intact grassland. Unless carefully planned and managed, the de...
Chapter
Roads and their associated infrastructure require regular inspection and maintenance to detect and repair faults before they pose a hazard to motorists and while the cost of repair remains relatively low. Mitigation measures for wildlife (e.g. crossing structures, wildlife detection systems, fencing) also need to be inspected and maintained to ensu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Our understanding of the ecological impacts of roads and traffic, and indeed other linear infrastructure such as railways and utility easements, has burgeoned in the past two decades. These ecological effects are numerous and diverse and can extend for many kilometres beyond the road itself. The suite of survey techniques and study designs to quant...
Chapter
Global road length, number of vehicles and rate of per capita travel are high and predicted to increase significantly over the next few decades.2The ‘road-effect zone’ is a useful conceptual framework to quantify the negative ecological and environmental impacts of roads and traffic.3The effects of roads and traffic on wildlife are numerous, varied...