Rodger A. Payne

Rodger A. Payne
University of Louisville | UL · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

51
Publications
23,761
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Citations
Introduction
Rodger A. Payne is a professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Louisville. Rodger researches multilateralism, global environmental politics, international security, and democratization of global politics. His two ongoing projects focus on the "America First" agenda and the importance of narratives in global politics.
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - June 2019
University of Dundee
Position
  • Visiting Global Scholar
September 2018 - December 2018
Carleton University
Position
  • Chair
January 2005 - May 2005
Harvard University
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Sabbatical

Publications

Publications (51)
Book
Historically, international institutions have been secretive and not particularly democratic. They have typically excluded almost all interested parties except the representatives of the most powerful nations. Because of this "deficit of democracy" international organizations and regimes have found themselves the target of protest movements and lob...
Article
Major powers are frequently urged to embrace grand strategies tied to particular International Relations theories. In the case of United States foreign policy, scholars generally analyse a well-known set of strategic choices – primacy, selective engagement, offshore balancing, collective security and cooperative security – favoured by relatively ma...
Article
Constructivist theorists view norms as shared understandings that reflect `legitimate social purpose'. Because the focus is on the ideational building blocks that undergird a community's shared understandings, rather than material forces, persuasive communication is considered fundamentally important to norm-building. In practice, this means that f...
Article
Journal of Democracy 6.3 (1995) 41-55 Since Kant, liberals have argued that a world filled with democracies would suffer fewer wars. Remarkably, a growing body of historical scholarship confirms that democratic states have not fought one another. A burgeoning literature now seeks to explain why this peace results. The present essay explores a diffe...
Article
The international relations field has recently taken a communicative turn. Social constructivists, for instance, regularly examine frames, persuasion, and other discursive mechanisms by which actors reach intersubjective agreement. Critical theorists add an overtly normative dimension by embracing the transformative potential of public deliber...
Article
Objective A significant portion ofthe American public does not accept the current overwhelming scientific consensus about the anthropogenic causality of climate change. This issue has been politicized and is now highly partisan. Because the military is the most trusted public institution in the United States, and the Environmental Protection Agency...
Article
Donald Trump’s populist, nationalist “America First” agenda advocates a transactional, zero-sum, hypercompetitive, and sovereigntist view of US foreign policy, which many scholars and policymakers conclude poses a considerable challenge to multilateralism. We explore the threat America First presents to the international human rights regime as refl...
Article
Donald Trump’s “America First” agenda seemingly departs drastically from United States foreign policy as practiced for many decades. This paper assesses the implications of the new U.S. approach for its relationship with Canada and for world order more broadly. America First overtly threatens the status of a wide array of bilateral and multilateral...
Chapter
No nuclear-armed states or their closest allies have signed the Nuclear Ban Treaty. These states emphasize that nuclear weapons remain necessary for deterrence purposes, even as many of them also claim to support disarmament in the long run. This inconsistent approach creates an opportunity to stigmatize nuclear deterrence strategy via the use of p...
Article
Dr. Strangelove continues to be viewed as one of the most acclaimed films of all-time. Likewise, international relations (IR) experts commonly list the film among the most essential IR-themed movies. The IR scholars who discuss Dr. Strangelove as a text or recommend it for courses generally claim that it can be used to explain nuclear deterrence, t...
Chapter
A foreign policy of “America First” seems to pose a significant challenge to the liberal international order and perhaps to U.S.–Canadian cooperation. This paper investigates the bilateral relationship in light of developing disagreements about the status of longstanding international agreements. Will Washington’s new emphasis on placing America Fi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A foreign policy of “America First” seems to pose a significant challenge to the liberal international order and perhaps to United States-Canadian cooperation. This paper investigates the bilateral relationship in light of developing disagreements about the status of longstanding international agreements. Will Washington’s new emphasis on placing A...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 2017, the United Nations adopted a Nuclear Weapon Ban Treaty, now open for ratification. The global disarmament movement was spurred in the last decade by the so-called humanitarian initiative, which emphasizes the unique catastrophic consequences of nuclear use. However, no nuclear arms state (or NATO member) voted to approve the treaty and non...
Article
Full-text available
From sustain. Find it here: http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/83ad86_9e202bb73528428e9aba8ad734a49c79.pdf#page=20
Article
In recent years, many international relations scholars have been discussing films, books, and television programs featuring zombies, largely because such narratives are thought to provide a compelling metaphor for thinking about a diverse array of contemporary threats. These range from relatively traditional threats posed by violent terrorists to n...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dr. Strangelove continues to be one of the most acclaimed comedic films of all-time, often appearing on critics’ lists enumerating great films. Likewise, international relations experts commonly view the film as a “no brainer” choice among the most essential IR-themed movies. Dan Lindley’s 2001 Teaching Guide to Dr. Strangelove offers the standard...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
National security elites and policymakers in the United States strategically construct narratives to identify threats, to advocate particular policy actions in response to those threats, and to maintain support for selected policy options. The paper aims to demonstrate that security elites have the motive, means, and opportunity to distort these na...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The "global war on terror" must be taken very seriously as a driving force for contemporary American security policy and it has consequently had a profound influence on international relations. However, this paper examines the GWOT through the narrative scope of comedy and satire. Indeed, in many ways, the GWOT can be viewed essentially as a spoof...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Realist international relations theorists commonly describe world politics in terms of tragedy. Dramatically, tragic narratives focus on the downfall or death of an elite character, often caused by the protagonist’s inherent character flaws. The stories are set in the Great Hall or on the battlefield and reveal how little control (despite concerted...
Article
Full-text available
In an important monograph published in 1961, Thomas Schelling and Morton Halperin argued that arms control and military policy should be committed to the same fundamental security purposes--preventing war, minimizing the costs and risks of arms competition, and curtailing the scope and violence of war in the event it should occur. The strategists,...
Article
After u September 2001, the George W. Bush administration declared that the United States had adopted a 'pre-emptive' military doctrine to address new threats posed by terrorists and 'rogue states' armed with nuclear, biological or chemical weapons. However, the so-called 'Bush Doctrine' met substantial international opposition when it was proposed...
Article
The “Bush Doctrine” asserting the right to preemptively attack states that support or harbor terrorists and pursue weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has bitterly divided world opinion. Many seemingly long-settled questions of international politics, especially involving the unilateral use of force, have been reopened. Although we are concerned abou...
Article
This article offers a conceptualisation of international regimes as a legitimate global political community. A legitimate political community features consensual norms and principles that have been openly debated by interested members of global society. Relying on a critical theoretical method, we argue that by conceptualising certain regimes as pu...
Article
Nearly 15 years has elapsed since the World Commission on Environment and Development—the so-called Brundtland Commission—popularized the idea of “sustainable development.” The phrase turned out to be unusually slippery, providing both political cover and ammunition for almost anyone engaged in debates about the global environment and/or developmen...
Article
This article examines the likely foreign policy initiatives of the U.S. under the leadership of George W. Bush. The new president has outlined a fairly thorough critique of America's international behavior in the 1990s. Because a leader's public statements arguably serve to persuade various audiences and to build support for policy change, the arti...
Chapter
At the June 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), the Global Environment Facility (GEF) was named the interim funding mechanism for both the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity, the two most important international agreements to emerge from the Rio meetings. GEF was also...
Article
Sustainable development practices should be embraced not only to forestall environmental destruction and resource exhaustion, but also to prevent conflicts apparently triggered by these causes. Unfortunately, environmentally-caused conflicts are perhaps most likely to erupt in the world's poorest states, which are least capable of pursuing sustaina...
Article
Nonprofit environmental organizations often have global policy goals. Consequently, they pursue transnational objectives by pressuring influential governments and international institutions. The effectiveness of this strategy as applied to nation-states varies by domestic political structure. First, transnational actors are more likely to achieve t...
Article
Renewed attention to the role of public opinion on foreign policy outcomes in quantitative correlational studies indicates that opinion influences foreign policy. However, authors of these studies note that their conclusions could be flawed if elites simply manipulate public opinion, rather than responding to it. Both realist and neorealist perspec...
Article
This paper suggests a technique for evaluating threat assessments when reliable data is unavailable. Previously, scholars have found that political leaders manipulated threat assessments to achieve desired defense policy outcomes. Yet contemporary communication about threats are not easily studied, leading some writers to call for new studies of Cl...
Article
Robert Axelrod's The Evolution Of Cooperation has been widely acclaimed in the few years since its publication. Given its promise for promoting cooperation in 'prisoner's dilemma games' (PDGs), such praise is unsurprising. The purpose of this paper is to consider whether the tit-for-tat (TFT) strategy Axelrod recommends for achieving an evolution o...
Article
This essay evaluates the effectiveness of President Ronald Reagan's ‘'Star Wars” address of March 23, 1983. The essay identifies three main audiences for U.S. defense policy rhetoric—the general public, experts, and foreign governments—and examines the appeal of the speech for each audience. It concludes that the address was effective for the gener...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Identify and explore previous and potential uses of comedic and satirical narratives in global politics.
Project
A foreign policy of “America First” seems to pose a significant challenge to the liberal international order. This project investigates the status of various bilateral relationships and multilateral agreements threatened implicitly or explictly by President Donald Trump's America First foreign policy agenda. Will Washington’s emphasis on placing America First threaten major institutions and the future of cooperation? Can multilateralism and the liberal international order endure without American leadership or, at minimum, a firm commitment to various institutions? Thanks to receipt of a Fulbright Canada research grant in fall 2018, some research will specifically explore the US-Canadian case.