Robyn Irvine

Robyn Irvine
Parks Canada Agency and Poisson Consulting Ltd. · Conservation Programs Branch

Ph.D. Stat. Ecol. U of Calgary

About

35
Publications
14,419
Reads
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195
Citations
Introduction
Using evidence to improve conservation and restoration practices used by Parks Canada and partner governments and NGOs.
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - present
Parks Canada
Position
  • Restoration Ecologist
Description
  • Incorporation of evidence based conservation into large scale restoration projects undertaken by Parks Canada; scientifically supporting conservation projects in western Canada focused on aquatic ecology.
November 2015 - March 2020
Parks Canada
Position
  • Project Manager
Description
  • Managed all aspects of large scale conservation projects for Gwaii Haanas under direction of the co-management board (Haida Nation and Government of Canada). Led first attempt at an ungulate eradication in Canada and worked on biosecurity and conservation planning using genomics for control of invasive species in the archipelago.
February 2008 - November 2015
Poisson Consulting Ltd.
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • Research focused on mitigation of human impacts on fish populations, technical review of design approaches to detecting ecosystem level change, answering conservation questions with limited data and large river field methods.
Education
September 1998 - January 2004
The University of Calgary
Field of study
  • Statistical Ecology
September 1992 - June 1996
University of Guelph
Field of study
  • Biology (Hons.)

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
As the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration begins, there remains insufficient emphasis on the human and social dimensions of restoration. The potential that restoration holds for achieving both ecological and social goals can only be met through a shift towards people-centered restoration strategies. Towards this end, this paper synthesizes critical...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are major contributors to global biodiversity decline. Invasive mammalian species (IMS), in particular, have profound negative effects in island systems that contain disproportionally high levels of species richness and endemism. The eradication and control of IMS have become important conservation tools for managing species invasi...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous societies worldwide recognize people as inherent parts of ecosystems (e.g., Council of the Haida Nation 2007, Brown and Brown 2009). Indigenous governance systems are based on relationships, knowledge, and practices that reflect a deep history of interdependence between people and the places they live, sustaining biological and cultural...
Article
Full-text available
Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) have commensally spread from northern China and Mongolia to become among the most invasive species on the planet. Understanding the proximate source(s) of invasion can inform biosecurity plans and eradication strategies for preventing or mitigating impacts to native biodiversity. The Haida Gwaii archipelago, located o...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species (IAS) are among the main causes of global biodiversity loss. Invasive brown (Rattus norvegicus) and black (R. rattus) rats, in particular, are leading drivers of extinction on islands, especially in the case of seabirds where >50% of all extinctions have been attributed to rat predation. Eradication is the primary form of inv...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species have led to precipitous declines in biodiversity, especially in island systems. Brown (Rattus norvegicus) and black rats (R. rattus) are among the most invasive animals on the planet, with eradication being the primary tool for established island populations. The need for increased research for defining eradication units and monito...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Haida Gwaii is a remote island archipelago located off the north Pacifi c coast, approximately 100 km from mainland British Columbia, Canada. The southern part of the archipelago, Gwaii Haanas, is designated a National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site, and is cooperatively managed by the Government of...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species represent one of the greatest threats to island ecosystems and the unique species that inhabit them. In many instances, eradication or control programs for invasive alien species have effectively curtailed the ongoing loss of biodiversity on islands. Prevention is a more proactive and cost-effective approach, however, and is...
Article
Full-text available
Determining when fish spawn has major implications for effective fisheries management, particularly in dam-controlled rivers where reproductive potential may be affected by an altered hydrograph. Three methods for estimating spawn timing in riverine broadcast spawners were compared for their precision, effort and potential impact on a population of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarizes the results of the fourth year of study carrying out adfluvial Bull Trout redd counts on tributaries to Slocan Lake for the Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) in Fall 2016. All creeks with Bull Trout accessible habitat were surveyed in late September 2016 to count redds and spawning fish. Redd surveys were conducte...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Each spring in the Lower Columbia River (LCR) below Hugh L. Keenleyside Dam (HLK) and in the Lower Kootenay River (LKR) below Brilliant Dam, thousands of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spawn. Since 1992, BC Hydro has stabilized the spring discharge releases from HLK to protect Rainbow Trout redds from dewatering. Prior to the 1992 implementati...
Article
Stranding of fish due to flow reductions has been documented in the near shore of the Columbia and Kootenay Rivers, Canada, and can result in sub-lethal or lethal effects on fish. Ten years (1999–2009) of monitoring data have been collected at sites below two hydro-electric dams (Hugh-L-Keenleyside and Brilliant Dam) following flow reductions. A ge...
Conference Paper
Juvenile fish are stranded and may die when water levels drop due to hydroelectric dam operations or natural river fluctuations. Data collected over ten years of monitoring flow reductions in the lower Columbia River, Canada allow questions to be posed regarding the environmental and operational factors that contribute to fish stranding and mortali...
Article
Juvenile fish can strand in pools or in interstitial spaces when the water elevation drops in regulated rivers due to flow reductions. Three years of summer and winter experiments on the Columbia and Kootenay Rivers (Canada) assessed the effect of the rate of change in water level (ramping rate) on the probability of pool and interstitial stranding...
Article
Full-text available
The subpopulation of white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in the Canadian portion of the Columbia River between Hugh L. Keenleyside Dam and the U.S.-Canada border has been identified as endangered, with nearly 30 consecutive years of consistent recruitment failure. The objectives of this study were to determine the status and population attribute...
Article
Full-text available
There have been few studies that have examined the spatial variance of nutrient limitation over the scale of an entire set of headwater streams. We used nutrient diffusing substrata experiments (control, nitrogen addition, phosphorus addition, and nitrogen+phosphorus addition) to examine how nutrient limitation varied throughout the five creeks tha...
Article
Ecosystem ecologists often face the challenge of predicting long-term con-sequences of perturbations such as nutrient enrichment from shorter term experiments. In such experiments, the spatial and temporal scale at which data are analyzed can directly impact extrapolations to larger scales. Here, we assess the level of data resolution required to a...
Article
Full-text available
1Population viability analyses (PVAs) are commonly used to identify species of concern. Many PVA techniques assume that all populations are regulated by a single mechanism.2We compared population viability predictions for three subspecies of sage grouse ( Centrocercus spp.) based on the assumptions that: (i) population regulation was density-indepe...
Article
Full-text available
Relatively mild temperatures (40-41.5 degrees C) can sensitize human cells to radiation without the development of thermal tolerance to radiosensitization. Therefore there may be a therapeutic benefit to adding mild hyperthermia to brachytherapy regimens for the treatment of cancer. However, the required heating times are long (approximately 48 h)...
Article
"NQ-93507" "February 2004." Thesis (Ph.D)--University of Calgary, Department of Biological Sciences, 2004. Includes bibliographical references. Microfiche.

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