Robin Wollast

Robin Wollast
Stanford University | SU · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Psychology

About

52
Publications
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Introduction
Dr. Wollast is a postdoctoral researcher in psychology. His primary research focuses on body image, dehumanization, self-compassion and mindfulness through various lenses (culture, gender, mental health). Besides this main focus, he studies dropout and perseverance in doctoral studies. Moreover, his current project focuses on collective action, group polarization and ideological extremism. Ultimately, he is involved in many projects related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Introduction This research examined the general attitudes toward lesbian women and gay men (LG people), same-sex marriage (SSM), and LG parenting (LGP) in a large sample of young heterosexual European adults. We expected that one’s country of origin, gender role traditionalism, contact, and religiosity would predict their responses. Method...
Article
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Article
Full-text available
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is related to difficulties in emotion regulation, including a deficit in interoceptive awareness. The lack of interoceptive awareness is considered a vulnerability involved in the development and maintenance of anorexic symptoms. Surprisingly, no study has been conducted that focuses on these associations in an emotional conte...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution reports on the results of an uncontrolled longitudinal study investigating the effects of a Multi-Family Therapy (MFT) as treatment for adolescent Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and the role played by perceived family functioning in these effects. 150 patients (144 females) and their families took part in a MFT and were assessed at the beg...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of the current research was to investigate how a series of psychological factors may underlie two COVID-19 health behaviors, and how a contextual factor (country of residence) could shape their influence. Cross-sectional results from the first pandemic wave ( N Belgium = 4878, N France = 1071) showed that handwashing and social contac...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper examines longitudinally how subjective perceptions about COVID-19, one’s community, and the government predict adherence to public health measures to reduce the spread of the virus. Using an international survey ( N = 3040), we test how infection risk perception, trust in the governmental response and communications about COVID-19...
Article
Full-text available
Before vaccines for COVID-19 became available, a set of infection prevention behaviors constituted the primary means to mitigate the virus spread. Our study aimed to identify important predictors of this set of behaviors. Whereas social and health psychological theories suggest a limited set of predictors, machine learning analyses can identify cor...
Article
Full-text available
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Preprint
The objective of the current research was to investigate how a series of psychological factors may underlie two COVID-19 health behaviors, and how a contextual factor (country of residence) could shape their influence. Cross-sectional results from the first pandemic wave (NBelgium = 4878, NFrance = 1071) showed that handwashing and social contact l...
Article
Understanding the determinants of COVID-19 vaccine uptake is important to inform policy decisions and plan vaccination campaigns. The aims of this research were to: (1) explore the individual- and country-level determinants of intentions to be vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, and (2) examine worldwide variation in vaccination intentions. This cross-s...
Article
Full-text available
There is today ample evidence that academic achievement depends on individual disparities in socioeconomic status (SES), working memory (WM) and academic self-concept (ASC). However, because these factors were investigated intensively but in separate fields of research in the past four to six decades, their relationships remain largely unknown. The...
Article
Full-text available
Tightening social norms is thought to be adaptive for dealing with collective threat yet it may have negative consequences for increasing prejudice. The present research investigated the role of desire for cultural tightness, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, in increasing negative attitudes towards immigrants. We used participant-level data from...
Article
The selective exposure effect describes people's tendency to prefer information that confirms rather than challenges their existing beliefs. The present research replicates the selective exposure effect in the context of meat reduction as strategy to combat climate change. Additionally, we tested whether biased information selection can help explai...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic presents a global crisis and authorities have encouraged the population to promote preventive health behaviors to slow the spread of the virus. While the literature on psychological factors influencing health behaviors during the COVID-19 is flourishing, there is a lack of cross-national research focusing on multiple health be...
Article
During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. conservative politicians and the media downplayed the risk of both contracting COVID-19 and the effectiveness of recommended health behaviors. Health behavior theories suggest perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors dete...
Article
The present research focuses on populism as a bottom-up phenomenon that emerges from shared perceptions of relative deprivation. We predict that by serving as a shared ideological basis, populist attitudes can mobilize leaderless anti-government protest across ideological boundaries. We test this prediction in the context of the French Yellow Vests...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N = 25,435). The main predictors were (1) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic presents threats, such as severe disease and economic hardship, to people of different ages. These threats can also be experienced asymmetrically across age groups, which could lead to generational differences in behavioral responses to reduce the spread of the disease. We report a survey conducted across 56 societies (N = 58,...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a new method to test the reliability of Fredrickson et al.’s self-objectification questionnaire (SOQ). This scale being based on a ranking, traditional reliability estimates are inappropriate. Based on generalizability theory, we suggest to compute the reliability of each subset of questions related to physical appearance vs. physical co...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Coronavirus is highly infectious and potentially deadly. In the absence of a cure or a vaccine, the infection prevention behaviors recommended by the World Health Organization constitute the only measure that is presently available to combat the pandemic. The unprecedented impact of this pandemic calls for swift identification of factors most i...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this work, we study how social contacts and feelings of solidarity shape experiences of loneliness during the COVID-19 lockdown in early 2020. We draw on cross-national data, collected across four time points between mid-March until early May 2020. We situate our work within the public debate on these issues and discuss to what extent the public...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to health behavior theories, perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors determine motivation to follow these recommendations. Because the U.S. President Trump and U.S. conservative politicians downplayed the risk and seriousness of contracting COVID-19 and the effectiv...
Article
Full-text available
The PsyCorona collaboration is a research project to examine processes involved in the COVID-19 pandemic, such as behavior that curbs virus transmission, which may implicate social norms, cooperation, and self-regulation. The study also examines psychosocial consequences of physical distancing strategies and societal lockdown, such as frustration o...
Article
Full-text available
L’objectification sexuelle, à savoir la tendance à considérer ou à traiter une personne comme un objet sexuel, est présente au quotidien dans les relations interpersonnelles comme dans les médias. En effet, ceux-ci (télévision, magazines, internet, jeux vidéo…) véhiculent des images sexualisées, idéalisées et stéréotypées des femmes et des hommes q...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives According to objectification theory, being treated as an object leads people, especially women, to perceive themselves as objects. This self-objectification increases body surveillance and feelings of body shame. While this relation is well-established in the literature, little is known about factors that can buffer against detrimental c...
Article
Full-text available
Objectification theory suggests that sexualization has significant dehumanizing consequences for how perceivers see women. To date, research has mostly documented how sexualized bodies in the mass media are objectified and dehumanized. The purpose of the present work was to test the novel cosmetics dehumanization hypothesis (CDH), that is, that sub...
Article
Full-text available
Mapping the Moods of COVID-19: Global Study Uses Data Visualization to Track Psychological Responses, Identify Targets for Intervention
Article
Full-text available
According to objectification theory, being treated as an object leads women to engage in self-objectification, which in turn increases body surveillance and body shame, impairing women’s mental health. While most studies focusing on self-objectification rely heavily on Western populations that emphasize individualism, the current work investigates...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N=25,435). The main predictors were (i) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (ii...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objectives: According to objectification theory, being treated as an object leads people, especially women, to perceive themselves as objects. This self-objectification increases body surveillance and feelings of body shame. While this relation is well-established in the literature, little is known about factors that can buffer against detrimental...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous studies suggested that public trust in government is vital for implementations of social policies that rely on public's behavioural responses. This study examined associations of trust in government regarding COVID-19 control with recommended health behaviours and prosocial behaviours. Data from an international survey with representative...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997), being treated as an object leads women to engage in self-objectification, which in turn increases body surveillance and body shame, impairing women’s mental health. While most studies focusing on self-objectification rely heavily on Western populations that emphasize individualism,...
Article
Self-objectification has been claimed to induce numerous detrimental consequences for women at the individual level (e.g., sexual dysfunction, depression, eating disorders). Additionally, at the collective level, it has been proposed that self-objectified women might themselves contribute to the maintenance of the patriarchal status quo, for instan...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reference for the published paper: Bernard, P., Content, J., Servais, L., Wollast, R., & Gervais, S. (2020). An Initial Test of the Cosmetics Dehumanization Hypothesis: Heavy Makeup Diminishes Attributions of Humanness-Related Traits to Women. Sex Roles. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-01115-y
Article
Full-text available
Sex is power belief (SIPB) positively relates to self‐objectification. This research aims at expanding this finding. We propose that SIPB involves an instrumental view of one's own body (i.e., self‐objectification) that leads women to experience the negative consequences classically associated with self‐objectification. We further suggest that SIPB...
Preprint
In this paper, we will discuss various issues related to the concept of resilience, which is conventionally defined as a dynamic process allowing for positive adaptation in a context of significant adversity. First, we will try to draw the reader's attention to the importance of the concept of resilience in terms of public health. Second, we will a...
Preprint
Ever since Fredrickson and Roberts (1997) proposed objectification theory, research on self-objectification and – by extension – other-objectification has experienced a considerable expansion. However, most of the studies on sexual objectification have been conducted solely in Western populations. This study investigates whether the effect of targe...
Article
Full-text available
According to objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997), being treated as an object leads women to engage in self‐objectification, which in turn increases body surveillance and body shame as well as impairs mental health. However, very little is known about what factors could act as buffers against the detrimental consequences of self‐obj...
Preprint
According to objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997), being treated as an object leads women to engage in self‐objectification, which in turn increases body surveillance and body shame as well as impairs mental health. However, very little is known about what factors could act as buffers against the detrimental consequences of self‐obj...
Preprint
Full-text available
L’objectification sexuelle, à savoir la tendance à considérer ou à traiter une personne comme un objet sexuel, est présente au quotidien dans les interactions interpersonnelles comme dans les médias. En effet, ceux-ci (télévision, magazines, internet, jeux vidéo…) véhiculent des images sexualisées, idéalisées et stéréotypées de femmes et des hommes...
Article
Full-text available
Research has shown that sexualized people are perceived as possessing fewer traits of a human being. Most scholars have argued that these effects are driven by revealing clothing, with targets wearing swimsuits or lingerie being perceived as possessing less mind and less humanness in comparison with nonsexualized targets. However, revealing clothin...
Article
Full-text available
L’objectification sexuelle, à savoir la tendance à considérer ou à traiter une personne comme un objet sexuel, comme un corps à consommer est présente au quotidien dans les médias . En effet, ceux-ci (télévision, magazines, internet, jeux vidéo, etc.) véhiculent des images sexualisées, idéalisées et stéréotypées de femmes et des hommes qui ne sont...
Article
Full-text available
The issue of considerable dropout rate in doctoral programs is well documented across a large number of countries. However, few studies address the factors associated with doctoral completion among Non-U.S. countries, multiple universities and fields of research. Nor do they investigate the interactions between these factors. The present paper aime...
Article
In this paper, we will discuss various issues related to the concept of resilience, which we conventionally defined as a dynamic process allowing for positive adaptation in a context of significant adversity. First, we will try to draw the reader's attention to the importance of the concept of resilience in terms of public health. Second, we will a...
Preprint
Dans ce chapitre, nous nous intéresserons au rôle des cognitions et attitudes dans les comportements intergroupes. Pour ce faire, nous commençons par introduire le concept de catégorisation sociale. Nous intéresserons à la façon dont ces deux aspects sont influencés par des variables d'ordres psycho-social (relations intergroupes, présence d'autrui...
Chapter
Full-text available
Dans ce chapitre, nous nous intéresserons au rôle des cognitions et attitudes dans les comportements intergroupes. Pour ce faire, nous commençons par introduire le concept de catégorisation sociale. Nous intéresserons à la façon dont ces deux aspects sont influencés par des variables d'ordres psycho-social (relations intergroupes, présence d'autrui...
Article
Full-text available
Ever since Fredrickson and Roberts (1997) proposed objectification theory, research on self-objectification and – by extension – other-objectification has experienced a considerable expansion. However, most of the studies on sexual objectification have been conducted solely in Western populations. This study investigates whether the effect of targe...

Questions

Questions (6)
Question
Hi everyone,
I tested an SEM model with 2 IV, 4 mediators and 1 DV on a sample of 1000 participants (see attached figure). Could you please help me to find an estimation for a good sample size using power analysis for this multiple-mediator model.
Best,
Robin
Question
Hi everyone,
I would like to know whether both cultural groups interpreted my questionnaire in a similar way. To do so, I conducted a measurement invariance analysis on the whole model of latent variables. However, I have seen that some authors report MI for their constructs separately and they do not report configural, metric, scalar and strict invariance for the whole model. What is the rule here?
Thank you.
Robin
Question
Hi everyone,
I have conducted a SEM analysis in AMOS then replicated it in RStudio. While I obtained identical estimates and model fit statistics, the p-values differ between software programs (see indirect effects in the attached output). Could you please explain me what kind of p-values are reported and which one of these should I report in my paper?
Best,
Robin
Question
Dear everyone,
Could you please tell me if my sample size calculation is correct?
Following the practical recommendation on sample size for structural equation modeling made by Kenny (2015), a 5 to 1 ratio of sample size to the number of free parameters is suggested (Bentler & Chou, 1987). The total number of elements in the initial covariance matrix is k(k+1)/2, where k equals the number of observed variables in the matrix. In this case, the total number of parameters = (27*28)/2 = 378. The parameters that have to be estimated in the model contains 27 observed variable variances, 20 loadings, 7 latent variable variances, 14 regression paths, and 7 latent variable covariances, which results in 75 free parameters. Note that 378-75 = 203 degrees of freedom. Given that we compare two groups, the degrees of freedom is 606 and the minimum sample size equals to 5 (ratio)*75 (number of free parameters)*2 (number of groups) = 750.
R code:
modelSDO <- 'SDOD =~ block19_2 + block19_3 + block19_5
SDOE =~ block19_1r + block19_4r + block19_6r
Multiculturalism =~ block7_1 + block7_2 + block7_3 + block7_4
Assimilation =~ block8_1 + block8_2 + block8_3 + block8_4
Colorblindness =~ block9_1 + block9_2 + block9_3 + block9_4
Interculturalism =~ block11_1 + block11_2 + block11_3 + block11_4
Prejudice =~ block15_1 + block15_2 + block15_3r + block15_4 + block15_5
#regressions
Prejudice ~ Multiculturalism + Assimilation + Colorblindness + Interculturalism + SDOD + SDOE
Multiculturalism ~ SDOD + SDOE
Assimilation ~ SDOD + SDOE
Colorblindness ~ SDOD + SDOE
Interculturalism ~ SDOD + SDOE
#covariances
SDOD ~~ SDOE
Multiculturalism ~~ Interculturalism
Multiculturalism ~~ Assimilation
Multiculturalism ~~ Colorblindness
Assimilation ~~ Interculturalism
Assimilation ~~ Colorblindness
Colorblindness ~~ Interculturalism'
Question
Dear everyone,
When I analyze and compare an identical model between groups, I always conduct measurement invariance analysis (Byrne, 2004) to demonstrate all participants interpreted the survey questions in a similar manner, which allows me to compare groups (e.g., means, path coefficients).
When I compare my model between groups, I found a significant indirect effect of variable A on variable C through variable B in group 1 (Standardized B = .161; SE = .036; 95%CI [.098; .238]) and in group 2 (Standardized B = .082; SE = .021; 95%CI [.047; .129]).
In this context, how do I know if the indirect effect observed in group 1 is significantly greater than the indirect effect observed in group 2? In the same veine, how do I know if the path coefficient observed from variable A to variable B is significantly different between groups, although it is significant (or not) within both groups.
Thank you for your help.
Robin
Question
Hi everyone,
It is all in the title. I added a preprint when my paper was accepted but in press. Then, I added the published article on my profile. Surprisingly, RG does not merge them automatically. Is there a way to do it by myself?
Thank you for your answers.
Robin

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