Robin Whytock

Robin Whytock
University of Stirling · Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

29
Publications
12,685
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432
Citations
Introduction
Ecologist and conservationist with broad interests in temperate and tropical forest biodiversity.
Education
October 2014 - April 2018
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2010 - June 2014
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Afrotropical forests host many of the world's remaining megafauna, but even here they are confined to areas where direct human influences are low. We use a rare long-term dataset of tree reproduction and a photographic database of forest elephants to assess food availability and body condition of an emblematic megafauna species at Lopé National Par...
Article
Global conservation targets to reverse biodiversity declines and halt species extinctions are not being met despite decades of conservation action. However, a lack of measurable change in biodiversity indicators towards these targets is not necessarily a sign that conservation has failed; instead, temporal lags in species’ responses to conservation...
Article
Full-text available
*** Please visit the accompanying website (linked as supplementary material in manuscript) for latest hardware updates *** https://solo-system.github.io/home.html ***............................................................ Audio recorders are widely used in terrestrial and marine ecology, and are essential for studying many cryptic or elusive t...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem function and resilience are compromised when habitats become fragmented due to land-use change. This has led to national and international conservation strategies aimed at restoring habitat extent and improving functional connectivity (i.e. maintaining dispersal processes). However, biodiversity responses to landscape-scale habitat creati...
Article
Global biodiversity is threatened by unsustainable exploitation for subsistence and commerce, and tropical forests are facing a hunting crisis. In Central African forests, hunting pressure has been quantified by monitoring changes in the abundance of affected species and by studying wild meat consumption, trade and hunter behaviour. However, a prop...
Article
Full-text available
1. Migratory species are protected under international legislation; their seasonal movements across international borders may therefore present opportunities for understanding how global conservation policies translate to local‐level actions across different socio‐ecological contexts. Moreover, local‐level management of migratory species can reveal...
Preprint
Efforts to preserve, protect, and restore ecosystems are hindered by long delays between data collection and analysis. Threats to ecosystems can go undetected for years or decades as a result. Real-time data can help solve this issue but significant technical barriers exist. For example, automated camera traps are widely used for ecosystem monitori...
Article
Full-text available
Intact forest landscapes (IFLs) are globally important for maintaining functional ecosystems. Ebo forest (~1400 km2) in Cameroon is one of the largest remaining IFLs in the Cross-Sanaga-Bioko coastal forest ecoregion and harbours several IUCN Red-Listed threatened mammal species. We evaluated the status, trends, and distribution of mammals ≥ 0.5 kg...
Article
Full-text available
1. Ecological data are collected over vast geographic areas using digital sensors such as camera traps and bioacoustic recorders. Camera traps have become the standard method for surveying many terrestrial mammals and birds, but camera trap arrays often generate millions of images that are time‐consuming to label. This causes significant latency be...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecological data are increasingly collected over vast geographic areas using arrays of digital sensors. Camera trap arrays have become the ‘gold standard’ method for surveying many terrestrial mammals and birds, but these arrays often generate millions of images that are challenging to process. This causes significant latency between data collection...
Article
Full-text available
Context Land-use change and habitat fragmentation are well known drivers of biodiversity declines. In forest birds, it has been proposed that landscape change can cause increased predation pressure that leads to population declines or community change. Predation can also have non-lethal effects on prey, such as creating ‘landscapes of fear’. Howeve...
Article
Full-text available
Mount Mbam is an unprotected Important Bird Area in West Cameroon, where 225 species have been observed to date, including three that are globally threatened—White-headed Vulture Trigonoceps occipitalis (Critically Endangered), Bannerman’s Turaco Tauraco bannermani (Endangered) and Bannerman’s Weaver Ploceus bannermani (Vulnerable)—and three that a...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation threatens biodiversity and ecosystem function. 'Permeability' and 'connectivity' indices are used to estimate how individuals, populations or genes move spatially through a landscape. Yet, despite the analogies between landscape permeability and the physical definition of permeability (the ability for a porous media t...
Article
Land use change in sub‐Saharan Africa continues apace, but its role in driving the declines of Afro‐Palaearctic migrant birds is unknown. This is due partly to a lack of knowledge of migrants’ requirements on the wintering grounds, and of spatially explicit assessments of land cover change. We compared tree cover data derived from satellite remote...
Article
Landscape context can affect how individuals perceive patch quality during colonization. However, although context-dependent colonization has been observed in aquatic environments, it has rarely been studied in terrestrial environments or at large spatial scales. In this paper, we assessed how landscape context influenced colonization rates in a la...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The migratory Lesser White-fronted Goose (LWfG) is globally threatened and under international protection across the flyway. Illegal hunting, including at important staging grounds in Central Asia, has been identified as a major cause of LWfG population declines. However, the economic, social and demographic drivers for goose hunting in general, an...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing temperatures associated with climate change may generate phenological mismatches that disrupt previously synchronous trophic interactions. Most work on mismatch has focused on temporal trends, whereas spatial variation in the degree of trophic synchrony has largely been neglected, even though the degree to which mismatch varies in space...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian zones are formed by interactions between fluvio-geomorphological processes, such as sediment deposition, and biota, such as vegetation. Establishment of invasive alien plant (IAP) species along rivers may influence vegetation dynamics, evidenced as higher seasonal or inter-annual fluctuations in native plant diversity when IAP cover is hig...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Lesser White-fronted Goose (LWfG) is a globally threatened migratory species (Jones et al., 2008). North-western Kazakhstan hosts important staging grounds for the autumn and spring LWfG migration (Cuthbert and Aarvak, 2016; Yerokhov, 2013). Hunting is a primary driver of declining LWfG populations, but the motives behind illegal LWfG hunting a...
Article
Populations of many Afro-Palearctic birds have declined, with those wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, such as Wood Warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix, particularly affected. In this study we investigated the relationship between habitat characteristics and Wood Warbler presence/absence in the Centre Region of Cameroon. A total of six transects were est...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Horse riding is a high risk sport. Numerous injuries and deaths to horses and riders occur in the cross country phase of eventing, with 45 rider deaths documented at national or international crosscountry competitions between 2007 and 2013. Cross country requires the horse and rider to jump solid, immobile fences over undulating ground, in an optim...
Article
Full-text available
Diurnal raptors have declined significantly in western Africa since the 1960s. To evaluate the impact of traditional medicine and bushmeat trade on raptors, we examined carcasses offered at markets at 67 sites (1–80 stands per site) in 12 countries in western Africa during 1990–2013. Black kite Milvus migrans and hooded vulture Necrosyrtes monachus...
Article
Full-text available
Capsule Maximum provisioning rates occurred during the seasonal peak in caterpillar availability, controlling for brood age and time of day. Aims To determine if the seasonal availability of caterpillars influenced Wood Warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix nest provisioning rates. Methods Remote cameras were used to monitor nest visits at 14 nests in 8...
Article
Full-text available
The commercial bushmeat trade threatens numerous species in the forests of West and Central Africa. Hunters shoot and trap animals, which are transported to rural and urban markets for sale. Village-based surveys of hunter offtake and surveys of bushmeat markets have shown that mammals and reptiles are affected most, followed by birds. However, hun...
Article
Full-text available
The Ebo forest is one of the largest (>1,500 km 2 ) and most functionally intact rainforests in the high biodiversity region between the Sanaga River in Cameroon and the Cross River in Nigeria. The raptor population consists of at least 13 diurnal species, including African Crowned Eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus), Cassin’s Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus afr...
Article
Full-text available
The Ebo forest is one of the largest remaining tracts of lowland and submontane rainforest north of the Sanaga River in Cameroon. The avian assemblage so far identified is typical for the region and currently numbers 160 species recorded from seven forest habitats. The presence of Malimbus racheliae and M. erythrogaster indicates that the forest ma...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Determine the reproductive success of the Grey-necked Picathartes and factors influencing this pattern.
Project
Provide keys area for the Grey-necked picathartes conservation action.
Project
This project aim to: - Determine the density, abundance and distribution of Mount Manengouba’s avifauna, - Determine the distribution and preferred habitats of threatened birds of global conservation concern occurring in the area, - Identify threats on birds and associated habitat, and assess their effects on birds communities, - Raise the level of awareness and knowledge of the local community on the importance of the Mount Manengouba forest and its associated exceptional biodiversity, by sensitizing at least 75% of the people living around the site trough Community workshops and school lectures.