Robin Morrison

Robin Morrison
The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International · Gorilla Program

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,304
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53
Citations
Introduction
Studying gorilla social behaviour to better understand the evolution of sociality, aggression, cooperation and friendship.
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - March 2020
Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2015 - May 2019
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2010 - July 2014
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (11)
Thesis
Full-text available
The study of western gorilla social behaviour has primarily focused on family groups, with research on inter-group interactions usually limited to the interactions of a small number of habituated groups or those taking place in a single location. Key reasons for this are the high investment of time and money required to habituate and monitor many g...
Article
Full-text available
Social complexity reflects the intricate patterns of social interactions in societies. Understanding social complexity is fundamental for studying the evolution of diverse social systems and the cognitive innovations used to cope with the demands of social life. Social complexity has been predominantly quantified by social unit size, but newer meas...
Article
Full-text available
1. Many species show territoriality, in which territory owners have exclusive or priority use of a region. In humans, tolerance of others within our space also depends greatly on our social relationships with them. This has been hypothesized as one potential driver of the evolution of long-term, inter-group relationships, through enabling shared ac...
Article
Full-text available
Mothers are crucial for mammals’ survival before nutritional independence, but many social mammals reside with their mothers long after. In these species the social adversity caused by maternal loss later in life can dramatically reduce fitness. However, in some human populations these negative consequences can be overcome by care from other group...
Article
Full-text available
Minimizing disease transmission between humans and wild apes and controlling outbreaks in ape populations is vital to both ape conservation and human health, but information on the transmission of real infections in wild populations is rare. We analyzed respiratory outbreaks in a subpopulation of wild mountain gorillas ( Gorilla beringei beringei )...
Data
Supplementary tables for: Social groups buffer maternal loss in mountain gorillas
Preprint
Mothers are crucial for mammals' survival before nutritional independence, but many social mammals reside with their mothers long after. In these species the social adversity caused by maternal loss later in life can dramatically reduce fitness. However, in some human populations these negative consequences appear to be overcome by care from other...
Article
Full-text available
The evolutionary origins of how modern humans share and use space are often modelled on the territorial-based violence of chimpanzees, with limited comparison to other apes. Gorillas are widely assumed to be non-territorial due to their large home ranges, extensive range overlap, and limited inter-group aggression. Using large-scale camera trapping...
Article
Full-text available
Modern human societies show hierarchical social modularity (HSM) in which lower-order social units like nuclear families are nested inside increasingly larger units. It has been argued that this HSM evolved independently and after the chimpanzee-human split due to greater recognition of, and bonding between, dispersed kin. We used network modularit...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To investigate how gorilla groups share and use space by quantifying ranging behaviour and avoidance patterns through camera trapping