Robin Bagley

Robin Bagley
The Ohio State University | OSU · Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology

PhD Biology

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23
Publications
2,337
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223
Citations

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Quantifying the frequency of shifts to new host plants within diverse clades of specialist herbivorous insects is critically important to understand whether and how host shifts contribute to the origin of species. Oak gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae: Cynipini) comprise a tribe of ~1000 species of phytophagous insects that induce gall formation o...
Article
Although haplodiploidy is widespread in nature, the evolutionary consequences of this mode of reproduction are not well characterized. Here, we examine how genome‐wide hemizygosity and a lack of recombination in haploid males affects genomic differentiation in populations that diverge via natural selection while experiencing gene flow. First, we si...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying the frequency of shifts to new host plants within diverse clades of specialist herbivorous insects is critically important to understand whether and how host shifts contribute to the origin of species. Oak gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae: Cynipini) comprise a tribe of ~1000 species of phytophagous insects that induce gall formation o...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of how novel warning color traits evolve in natural populations is largely based on studies of reproductive stages and organisms with endogenously produced pigmentation. In these systems, genetic drift is often required for novel alleles to overcome strong purifying selection stemming from frequency‐dependent predation and positiv...
Article
Full-text available
Preprints are manuscripts posted on a public server that do not yet have formal certification of peer review from a scholarly journal. The increasingly prominent online repositories for these preprints provide a means of rapidly making scientific results accessible to all with an Internet connection. We here describe the catalysis and subsequent de...
Preprint
Full-text available
Empirical data from diverse taxa indicate that the hemizygous portions of the genome (X/Z chromosomes) evolve more rapidly than their diploid counterparts. Faster-X theory predicts increased rates of adaptive substitutions between isolated species, yet little is known about species experiencing gene flow. Here we investigate how hemizygosity impact...
Article
Congeneric parasites are unlikely to specialize on the same tissues of the same host species, likely because of strong multifarious selection against niche overlap. Exceptions where >1 congeneric species use the same tissues reveal important insights into ecological factors underlying the origins and maintenance of diversity. Larvae of sunflower ma...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our understanding of how novel color traits evolve in aposematic taxa is based largely on studies of reproductive stages and organisms with endogenously produced pigmentation. In these systems, genetic drift is often required for novel alleles to overcome strong purifying selection stemming from frequency-dependent predation and positive assortativ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stereum is a globally widespread genus of basidiomycete fungi with conspicuous shelf-like fruiting bodies. Several species have been extensively studied due to their economic importance, but broader Stereum taxonomy has been stymied by pervasive morphological crypsis in the genus. Here, we provide a preliminary investigation into species boundaries...
Preprint
Congeneric parasites are unlikely to specialize on the same tissues of the same host species, likely because of strong multifarious selection against niche overlap. Exceptions where multiple congeneric species overlap on the same tissues may therefore reveal important insights into the ecological factors underlying the origins and maintenance of di...
Article
Disentangling the contemporary and historical factors underlying the spatial distributions of species is a central goal of biogeography. For species with broad distributions but little capacity to actively disperse, disconnected geographical distributions highlight the potential influence of passive, long-distance dispersal (LDD) on their evolution...
Article
Full-text available
Background: We challenge the oft-repeated claim that the beetles (Coleoptera) are the most species-rich order of animals. Instead, we assert that another order of insects, the Hymenoptera, is more speciose, due in large part to the massively diverse but relatively poorly known parasitoid wasps. The idea that the beetles have more species than othe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Disentangling the contemporary and historical factors underlying the spatial distributions of species is a central goal of biogeography. For species with broad distributions but little capacity to actively disperse, disconnected geographic distributions highlight the potential influence of passive, long-distance dispersal (LDD) on their evolutionar...
Preprint
Background We challenge the oft-repeated claim that the beetles (Coleoptera) are the most species-rich order of animals. Instead, we assert that another order of insects, the Hymenoptera, are more speciose, due in large part to the massively diverse but relatively poorly known parasitoid wasps. The idea that the beetles have more species than other...
Article
Full-text available
Divergent host use has long been suspected to drive population differentiation and speciation in plant-feeding insects. Evaluating the contribution of divergent host use to genetic differentiation can be difficult, however, as dispersal limitation and population structure may also influence patterns of genetic variation. In this study, we use doubl...
Article
Although most Hymenoptera reproduce via arrhenotokous haplodiploidy, the underlying genetic mechanisms vary. Of these, the most widespread mechanism appears to be single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD), in which individuals that are diploid and heterozygous at a sex-determining locus are female, and individuals that are homozygous or...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Despite great diversity in life history, conifer sawflies have been studied almost exclusively from an agricultural perspective. Recently, a robust phylogeny for the genus Neodiprion has become available, presenting an opportunity to examine adaptive change within this clade. Based on behavioral and morphological characters gathered from the litera...

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