Robert M. Mok

Robert M. Mok
University of Cambridge | Cam · MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit

D.Phil

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19
Publications
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210
Citations

Publications

Publications (19)
Preprint
A complete neuroscience requires multi-level theories that address phenomena ranging from higher-level cognitive behaviors to activities within a cell. A levels-of-mechanism approach that decomposes a higher-level model of cognition and behavior into component mechanisms provides a coherent and richer understanding of the system than any level alon...
Article
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For decades, researchers have debated whether mental representations are symbolic or grounded in sensory inputs and motor programs. Certainly, aspects of mental representations are grounded. However, does the brain also contain abstract concept representations that mediate between perception and action in a flexible manner not tied to the details o...
Preprint
Much of higher cognition involves abstracting away from sensory details and thinking conceptually. How do our brains learn and represent such abstract concepts? Recent work has proposed that neural representations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which are involved in spatial navigation, might also support learning of higher-level knowledge struc...
Article
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Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) typically employs the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism. In non-human primates (NHP), contrast enhancement is possible using monocrystalline iron-oxide nanoparticles (MION) contrast agent, which has a more temporally extended response function. However, using BOLD fMRI in NHP i...
Preprint
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How does the brain construct a mental representation appropriate for categorization? For decades, researchers have debated whether mental representations are symbolic or grounded in sensory inputs and motor programs. We evaluated these competing accounts with human participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants comple...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) typically employs the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism. In non-human primates (NHP), contrast enhancement is possible using monocrystalline iron-oxide nanoparticles (MION) contrast agent, which has a more temporally extended response function. However, using BOLD fMRI in NHP i...
Article
Full-text available
One view is that conceptual knowledge is organized using the circuitry in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) that supports spatial processing and navigation. In contrast, we find that a domain-general learning algorithm explains key findings in both spatial and conceptual domains. When the clustering model is applied to spatial navigation tasks, so-cal...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is essential for normal cognitive function, but shows marked decline in aging. The importance of selective attention in guiding WM performance is increasingly recognized. Studies so far are inconclusive about the ability to use selective attention during WM in aging. To investigate the neural mechanisms supporting selective atte...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is essential for normal cognitive function, but shows marked decline in aging. The importance of selective attention in guiding WM performance is increasingly recognized. Studies so far are inconclusive about the ability to use selective attention during WM in aging. To investigate the neural mechanisms supporting selective atte...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) shows significant decline with age. It is interesting to note that some research has suggested age-related impairments can be reduced in tasks that involve emotion-laden stimuli. However, only a few studies have explored how WM for emotional material changes in aging. Here we developed a novel experimental task to compare and co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is essential for normal cognitive function, but shows marked decline in aging. Studies have shown that the ability to attend selectively to relevant information amongst competing distractors is related to WM capacity. The extent to which WM deficits in aging are related to impairments in selective attention is unclear. To invest...
Preprint
Full-text available
One view is that conceptual knowledge is organized as a "cognitive map" in the brain, using the circuitry in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) that supports spatial navigation. In contrast, we find that a domain-general learning algorithm explains key findings in both spatial and conceptual domains. When the clustering model is applied to spatial navi...
Article
Building machines that learn and think like humans is essential not only for cognitive science, but also for computational neuroscience, whose ultimate goal is to understand how cognition is implemented in biological brains. A new cognitive computational neuroscience should build cognitive-level and neural- level models, understand their relationsh...
Preprint
Working memory (WM) shows significant decline with age. Interestingly, some research has suggested that age-related impairments can be reduced in tasks that involve emotion-laden stimuli. However, only a few studies have explored how WM for emotional material changes in aging. Here we developed a novel experimental task to compare and contrast how...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) declines as we age and, because of its fundamental role in higher order cognition, this can have highly deleterious effects in daily life. We investigated whether older individuals benefit from flexible orienting of attention within WM to mitigate cognitive decline. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG) in older adults perfor...
Article
Although oscillatory activity in the alpha band was traditionally associated with lack of alertness, more recent work has linked it to specific cognitive functions, including visual attention. The emerging method of rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows causal interventional tests for the online impact on performance of TMS admini...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing interest in multisensory influences upon sensory-specific judgments, such as when auditory stimuli affect visual perception. Here we studied whether the duration of an auditory event can objectively affect the perceived duration of a co-occurring visual event. On each trial, participants were presented with a pair of successive...

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