Robert Marzec

Robert Marzec
Purdue University | Purdue · Department of English

About

29
Publications
1,907
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197
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
123 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
This commentary analyzes the ontological character of the United Nations’ Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and its attempt to imagine business-as-usual and transformative human-environmental futures. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) constitutes the first and most significant attempt by an international political body to incorporate en...
Article
Two features bear down fundamentally on our current historical occasion: structures of security, and breakdowns of planetary ecosystems. This essay argues that Deleuze is not only tracing a “geophilosophy” (that is, a nonhuman-centered theory of history that includes a geohistory of the planet) that moves from nomadic through State and finally thro...
Chapter
The conclusion presents a number of alternatives to environmentality, thinking, for instance, the power of Agamben’s recent work on the concept of the Umwelt in relation to the counter-history and counter-geopolitics of “inhabitancy.”
Chapter
Chapter Three is the first of two-parts that historically traces the militarization of the sciences. It specifically reveals how human subjectivity as part of a habitation and of limited, local relations was replaces by a militarized and global-acting (or “geological” in nature) subjectivity that directly led to global forms of human ecological dis...
Article
This essay situates the critical work of William V. Spanos in relation to the liminal event of anthropocentric planetary climate change—specifically the manner in which this event is being subordinated to military ends by the US national security state in particular and the global security society in general. In recent years, Spanos has emphasized...
Book
As the seriousness of climate change becomes more and more obvious, military institutions are responding by taking a prominent role in the governing of environmental concerns, engaging in "climate change war games," and preparing for the effects of climate change-from conflicts due to loss of food, water, and energy to the mass migration of million...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue of Public Culture explores forms of environmental image making and visualization in the context of the Anthropocene. The essays aim to spark dialogue about how visual technologies and media—from satellite imaging and military simulation to animation and infographics—are shaping contemporary perceptions of both ecological risks an...
Article
This essay explores the erasure of the ecological commons as an environmental and representative space of political contestation, in and through the development of a specific type of imaging process that transforms the ecological commons into a spectacle. Specifically, it examines visualizations of performative environmental protests that took plac...
Article
This essay argues that current efforts by United States security institutions and the security society to adopt climate change as a central mandate have begun to reformulate radically the constitution of the citizen-subject. State-formed life and the liberatory pole of citizen-subject life face a collapse in this reformulation that pulls the citize...
Article
The initial category of this forum was "the New American Studies." I decided to take the "new" in that category seriously—that is, as a concept that opens a pathway to potential directions that American studies might take (and, as we shall see, is indeed taking), especially in the wake of recent shifts in American governance that seek to impact str...
Article
It has now been a decade since a group of nineteen men affiliated with al-Qaeda—fifteen from Saudi Arabia, two from the United Arab Emirate, one from Lebanon, and one from Egypt—hijacked four US airliners and flew two of them into the World Trade Center towers, another into the Pentagon, while the fourth crashed in rural Pennsylvania when the passe...
Article
This essay examines the transformation in land relations known as the enclosure movement that paralleled the rise of the British Empire. It reveals this transformation to be a major motivator in today's cultural and political orientations toward the environment, and toward land relations in general. It argues that the ontology of enclosure has cont...
Article
To recast Shakespeare’s Mark Antony, this special issue seeks neither to praise postcolonialism nor to bury it, exactly. As an introductory essay, it may be useful here to begin with the “post” itself, as the prefix that both enables and delimits an entire range of literary, theoretical, and cultural practices under the heading of the postcolonial....
Article
Artaud said: to write for the illiterate. . . . But what does 'for' mean? It is not 'for their benefit,' or yet 'in their place.' It is 'before.' It is a question of becoming. We think and write for animals themselves. We become animal so that the animal also becomes something else. The agony of a rat or the slaughter of a calf remains present in t...
Article
This essay argues that the US is in the midst of a transformation from governmentality to militariality, a transformation achieving normalization with the official passing-into-law of the post-9/11 Homeland Security Act and the USA Patriot Act, and the coming-to-actuality of preemptive warfare with the US declaration of war against Iraq. The politi...
Article
It is no easy task to politicize the garden. As one of the founding religious and cultural constructs of the Western tradition (the biblical narrative of Eden) the garden remains largely a sacred space and a sacred narrative that marks the beginning (in the act of expulsion) and ending (in the hope of a teleological return) for a certain historical...
Chapter
Two historical developments parallel the coming to presence of the English novel: the rise of the British Empire, and the land-reformation phenomenon known as the Enclosure Movement. Connections of the novel to the former have been made many a time in the past two decades. Yet the massive nationwide and eventually worldwide restructuring of humanit...
Chapter
The previous chapter focused on a retrieval of different potentials for thinking the land in relation to the monumentalized historical discourse of enclosure acts. This history regards these acts as generated variously by the vicissitudes of a growing population, the advancements of technology, the ascendency of the free-willed individual, natural...
Article
This book argues that humanity’s relationship to the land has undergone a fundamental and calamitous change. Marzec reveals how the historical phenomenon known as the ‘enclosure movement’ has effected not only the ecosystems and the geopolitics of the Twenty-First century, but on how we relate to the earth and conceive of ourselves as human.
Article
Susan Willis' Portents of the Real, as the subtitle tells us, is a "Primer for Post-9/11 America." The book lives up to this promise by offering a gravely-needed reconsideration of a series of cultural events that took place in the years immediately following 9/11. These events—the eruption of patriotism in the form of a mass dissemination of Ameri...
Article
symploke 9.1-2 (2001) 165-168 The jacket of William V. Spanos' America's Shadow tells us that the Vietnam War -- specifically the tremendous labor of repression of that war by the American political and culture industry -- stands at the center of his book. Certainly so. But even more central to this work, I would argue, is what the failure to consi...
Article
boundary 2 29.2 (2002) 129-156 —Arthur Young, A Six Months' Tour through the North of England (1770) —Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe When Robinson Crusoe first sees the island that will eventually become his homeland for twenty-seven years, he is so filled with anxiety that he codes the land as "more frightful than the Sea." Fearful of unknown space...

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