Robert Buitenwerf

Robert Buitenwerf
Aarhus University | AU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

34
Publications
32,113
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,713
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
The savannas of the Kenya-Tanzania borderland cover >100,000 km 2 and is one of the most important regions globally for biodiversity conservation, particularly large mammals. The region also supports >1 million pastoralists and their livestock. In these systems, resources for both large mammals and pastoralists are highly variable in space and time...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological processes and biodiversity patterns are strongly affected by how animals move through the landscape. However, it remains challenging to predict animal movement and space use. Here we present our new r package enerscape to quantify and predict animal movement in real landscapes based on energy expenditure. enerscape integrates a general l...
Article
Full-text available
Defaunation is a global threat to biodiversity that can be counteracted through trophic rewilding, a restoration strategy that promotes self-regulating ecosystems through active reintroductions or passive management. In order to estimate success in restoration initiatives, progress of the rewilding projects is measured and monitored. However, a spa...
Preprint
Full-text available
From global nature conservation policies to carbon off-set private initiatives, the focus on tree promotion, and tree planting in particular, as a nature-based solution to global environmental crises such as climatic change and biodiversity loss dominates the current discourse. Yet, this fixation on trees does not reflect a scientific consensus on...
Article
Full-text available
Land-surface greening has been reported globally over the past decades. While often seen to represent ecosystem recovery, the impacts on biodiversity and society can also be negative. Greening has been widely reported from rangelands, where drivers and processes are complex due to its high environmental heterogeneity and societal dynamics. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Aims: Novel ecosystems are self-maintaining ecosystems that support species assemblages without historical precedent. Despite much interest and controversy around novel ecosystems, it remains poorly understood how they are generated, what their capacity to support biodiversity is and what the implications for society are. Here, we address these iss...
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian carnivores are considered a key group in maintaining ecological health and can indicate potential ecological integrity in landscapes where they occur. Carnivores also hold high conservation value and their habitat requirements can guide management and conservation plans. The order Carnivora has 84 species from 8 families in the Neotropica...
Article
The Greater Maasai Mara Ecosystem (GMME) in Kenya is an iconic savanna ecosystem of high importance as natural and cultural heritage, notably by including the largest remaining seasonal migration of African ungulates and the semi-nomadic pastoralist Maasai culture. Comprehensive mapping of vegetation distribution and dynamics in GMME is important f...
Article
Full-text available
Plant traits—the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants—determine how plants respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, and influence ecosystem properties and their benefits and detriments to people. Plant trait data thus represent the basis for a vast area of research sp...
Article
Savanna megafauna have become scarce outside of protected areas in Africa, largely because of land conversion for farming (smallholders and agribusiness) and expansion of settlements and other infrastructure. Intensification also isolates protected areas, even affecting natural processes within reserve boundaries. Here, we used satellite imagery fr...
Article
Theory suggests that increasing productivity and climate stability towards the tropics favours specialization, thus contributing to the latitudinal richness gradient. A positive relationship between species richness and specialization should therefore emerge as a fundamental biogeographical pattern. However, land‐use and climate changes disproporti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim Theory suggests that increasing productivity and climate stability toward the tropics can explain the latitudinal richness gradient by favouring specialization. A positive relationship between species richness and specialization should thus emerge as a fundamental biogeographic pattern. However, land use and climate change disproportionally inc...
Article
Thousands of species have been introduced to new ranges worldwide. These introductions provide opportunities for researchers to study evolutionary changes in form and function in response to new environmental conditions. However, almost all previous studies of morphological change in introduced species have compared introduced populations to popula...
Article
The satellite record has revealed substantial land surface "greening" in the northern hemisphere over recent decades. Process-based Earth system models (ESMs) attribute enhanced vegetation productivity (greening) to CO2 fertilisation. However, the models poorly reproduce observed spatial patterns of greening, suggesting that they ignore crucial pro...
Article
C3 plants can increase nutrient uptake by increasing transpiration, which promotes the flow of water with dissolved nutrients towards the roots. However, it is not clear if this mechanism of nutrient acquisition, termed ‘mass flow’, also operates in C4 plants. This is an important question, as differences in mass flow capacity may affect compet...
Article
Observed vegetation change in the Northern Hemisphere can, with a high degree of confidence, be attributed to human-caused global change.
Article
Full-text available
The pre-clearance New Zealand lowlands were largely in complex, liana-rich, multi-layered conifer–angiosperm forest. Here it is designated oceanic temperate forest (OTF), its climatic envelope is defined, global distribution is assessed and origin is reviewed. Often described as Gondwanan or relic, tree genera characteristic of the OTF are more lik...
Article
Biomes are important constructs for organising understanding of how the worlds major terrestrial ecosystems differ from one another and for monitoring change in these ecosystems. Yet existing biome schemes have been criticised for being overly subjective and for explicitly or implicitly invoking climate. We propose a new biome map and classificatio...
Article
The seasonal timing and duration of leaf deployment has major implications for earth–atmosphere interactions and biotic processes. While evidence for impacts of global change on the timing of leaf deployment (leaf phenology) is accumulating, knowledge of the mechanisms that determine the duration of leaf deployment (leaf habit) and its geographical...
Article
Changes in the phenology of vegetation activity may accelerate or dampen rates of climate change by altering energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere and can threaten species with synchronized life cycles. Current knowledge of long-term changes in vegetation activity is regional, or restricted to highly integrated measures of ch...
Article
Full-text available
Soil water potential is crucial to plant transpiration and thus to carbon cycling and biosphere–atmosphere interactions, yet it is difficult to measure in the field. Volumetric and gravimetric water contents are easy and cheap to measure in the field, but can be a poor proxy of plant-available water. Soil water content can be transformed to water p...
Article
Full-text available
Soil water potential is crucial to plant transpiration and thus to carbon cycling and biosphere–atmosphere interactions, yet it is difficult to measure in the field. Volumetric and gravimetric water contents are easy and cheap to measure in the field, but can be a poor proxy of plant-available water. Soil water content can be transformed to water p...
Article
Soil water potential is crucial to plant transpiration and thus to carbon cycling and biosphere–atmosphere interactions, yet it is difficult to measure in the field. Volumetric and gravimetric water contents are easy and cheap to measure in the field, but can be a poor proxy of plant-available water. Soil water content can be transformed to water p...
Article
Full-text available
Some introduced populations thrive and evolve despite the presumed loss of diversity at introduction. We aimed to quantify the amount of genetic diversity retained at introduction in species that have shown evidence of adaptation to their introduced environments. Samples were taken from native and introduced ranges of Arctotheca populifolia and Pet...
Article
For the past century, woody plants have increased in grasslands and savannas worldwide. Woody encroachment may significantly alter ecosystem functioning including fire regimes, herbivore carrying capacity, biodiversity and carbon storage capacity. Traditionally, increases in woody cover and density have been ascribed to changes in the disturbance r...
Article
Full-text available
Litter-feeding termites influence key aspects of the structure and functioning of semi-arid ecosystems around the world by altering nutrient and material fluxes, affecting primary production, foodweb dynamics and modifying vegetation composition. Understanding these complex effects depends on quantifying spatial heterogeneity in termite foraging ac...
Article
1. Small fenced reserves are perceived to require management interventions to maintain ecosystems in a natural state. Such interventions are typically initiated and assessed on the basis of short-term observations, while slow changes are often misunderstood or missed entirely. Long-term monitoring is therefore crucial to understand the effect of re...
Article
1. The effects of moisture conditions, seed morphology, vegetation structure and hydrodynamic variables on seed retention were examined in a system where the dominant dispersal agent is water. Experiments were conducted in a tidal salt marsh and in a flume facility where hydrodynamic variables could be controlled. 2. Moisture condition of seeds gre...
Article
Full-text available
While the key role of termites in the decomposition of litter in the tropics has been acknowledged for a long time, much less information exists on their importance in the recycling of dung of primary consumers, especially herbivores. A review of published studies shows that a diverse group of termites (at least 126 species) has been reported to fe...
Article
While the key role of termites in the decomposition of litter in the tropics has been acknowledged for a long time, much less information exists on their importance in the recycling of dung of primary consumers, especially herbivores. A review of published studies shows that a diverse group of termites (at least 126 species) has been reported to fe...

Network

Cited By