Robert E Beard

Robert E Beard
Bucknell University · Department of Modern Languages & Linguistics

Doctor of Philosophy Slavic Linguistics, University of Michigan

About

34
Publications
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Introduction
I retired from Bucknell and linguistics in 2000 to form a company, Lexiteria, that provided frequency lists to software developers. I have now re-retired from that occupation to develop my personal website at www.rbeard.com. I hope to publish a complete description of Lexeme-Morpheme Base Morphology there, to be completed by the end of this summer. I have the first complete theory of morphology: inflectional and word formation, competence and performance.
Additional affiliations
June 1965 - June 2000
Bucknell University
Position
  • Ruth Everett Siezega Professor Emeritus
September 1959 - January 1966
University of Michigan
Position
  • Graduate student, PhD Slavic Linguistics

Publications

Publications (34)
Book
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This book demonstrates that all Indo-European languages have the same template for their lexicons. It it is a "complete" theory because it contains a competence and performance theory of all IE lexica.
Article
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This article discussed the operations around the lexical feature INALPOSS (inalienable possessional) and the distinction between an inalienable possessional and a regular possessional feature (HAdj) during lexical derivation (word formation).
Research
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This paper presents 6 pieces of evidence that "plural" is not an inflectional category but a word formation (lexical derivation) category.
Article
We assessed whether and under what conditions noncanonical agreement patterns occur in Russian, with the goal of understanding the factors involved in normal agreement. Russian is a morphosyntactically rich language in which agreement involves features for number, gender, and case. If consistent, overt specification of number and gender agreement f...
Chapter
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May be phonemically expressed Tabl e1 Lexemes and Morphemes The definitions of the two categories are simple: Lexemes are noun, verb, and adjective stems. These items in all languages are manifested without exception as sound-meaning pairings that refer to something in the real world. Any other meaningful linguistic phenomenon is a Morpheme and hen...
Article
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Article
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The argument over how many productive declensions the various Slavic languages have has raged for ages now. The problem in determining the number of declensions stems from the fuzziness of our definition of the term 'declension' and the lack of definition of related terms, such as 'number', 'case', and 'gender'. In this paper I will assume the defi...
Article
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Recent work on grammatical categories define Gender as an Agreement class. Close examination of the Slavic languages, however, reveals that Natural Gender, Agreement, and Declension Class all must be maintained and distinguished. If we describe these categories properly, however, the reward is that Animacy may be reduced to Natural Gender and remov...
Article
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This article explores the nature of morphological categories by examining two of the most ubiquitous denominal adjective types, the possessional (bearded) and similitudinal (friendly) adjectives. Sometimes these adjectives are morphologically distinct, sometimes not; compare icy road and icy hand. This suggests that they are related yet not related...
Article
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The assumption that attribute phrases like nuclear physicist constitute a bracketing paradox which may be resolved by special rules such as head rules, rebracketing rules, and productive backformation has gone unchallenged for more than a decade. This paper argues that such structural solutions do not work, since the same scope problems are reflect...
Article
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Booij argued recently that the problem of Agentive-Instrumental polysemy among Dutch nominalizations ending in -er can be resolved without resorting to the separation of derivation from affixation (the Separation Hypothesis). He argues for a ‘semantic extension scheme’ whereby an instrumental nominalization like open-er ‘opener’ is explained as a r...
Article
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1987 This chapter describes the performance theory of Lexeme-Morpheme Base Morphology, a complete theory of linguistic morphology. "Complete" because it not only provides a competence theory of inflectional and derivational morphology and the relation between them, but offers a complete theory of morphological performance theory as well. The perfor...
Article
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This paper argues that contemporary morphological theories are undermined by the concept of the linguistic sign, the morpheme or the word, which forms the basis of these theories. Instead of the sign, grammars operate on two distinct and definitionally incompatible basic units, the lexeme, which is a linguistic sign, and the (grammatical) morpheme,...
Article
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1. The Type Transparency Hypothesis Since its inception, the generative school of linguistic theory has struggled to establish an attitude toward the relation of its competence model of grammar to a psychological model of performance (parser). Initially it was hoped that the relation would be "transparent", that the items and operations of grammar...
Article
In a recent article on the indivisibility of ‘words’ (Sampson, 1979), Geoffrey Sampson, in arguing against the semantic decomposition of ‘vocabulary items’, concludes with a claim against lexical decomposability of derived items such as Nixonite, etc. One can hardly take issue, I think, with his argument against the purely semantic decomposition of...
Article
Several hitherto unconnected lines of research on the nature of lexemic derivation are integrated and focused on the problem of lexical irregularities. A system of derivational typology is developed, which departs from Kurylowicz's distinction of syntactical and lexical derivations, but continues in distinguishing among the latter, those which disp...
Article
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The solution of a problem may be expedited or encumbered by the statement of the problems itself. Approaching the problem of Possessional Adjective (HAdjs) from the perspective of one of their phonological realizations has misled earlier descriptions of the problems surrounding HAdjs. HAdjs, which mean "having (many/much X" are realized by several...
Article
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This paper briefly re-examines the major drawbacks of the transformationalist approach to word formation, and analyses those aspects of word formation which are most problematic: semantic-syntactic asymmetry, metaphoric usage, and restricted rule productivity. It concentrates on asymmetrical word derivation as opposed to symmetrical and asemantic d...
Article
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This is a state-of-the-art review of word formative morphology. The paper surveys three loosely knit 'schools' of word formation: (1) the Generative school, (2) the Continental school, and (3) the Slavicist school. It points out that much work in word formation is being duplicated because of a lack of coordination and communication between the resp...
Article
I present a computational model that allows for a clean formal account of a wide variety of morphological phenomena. Much of what i present is based on the large literature on finite-state approaches to morphology, but it is more coherent in that I propose that all morphological operations can be modeled using a single regular operation: compositio...
Article
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Michigan, 1966. Bibliography: leaves 75-78.

Projects

Projects (4)
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