Robert Anthony

Robert Anthony
United States Geological Survey | USGS · Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory

Ph.D.

About

46
Publications
12,689
Reads
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732
Citations
Citations since 2016
38 Research Items
716 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Since 2004, the most complete estimate of background noise levels across the continental United States was attained using 61 broadband seismic stations to calculate power spectral density (PSD) probability density functions. To improve seismic noise estimates across the United States, we examine vertical component seismic data from the EarthScope U...
Article
Full-text available
Seismologists have recently begun using low-cost nodal sensors in dense deployments to sample the seismic wavefield at unprecedented spatial resolution. Earthquake early warning systems and other monitoring networks (e.g., wastewater injection) would also benefit from network densification; however, current nodal sensors lack power systems or the r...
Article
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Power spectral density (PSD) estimates are widely used in seismological studies to characterize background noise conditions, assess instrument performance, and study quasi-stationary signals that are difficult to observe in the time domain. However, these studies often utilize different processing techniques, each of which can inherently bias the r...
Article
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Human activity causes vibrations that propagate into the ground as high-frequency seismic waves. Measures to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic caused widespread changes in human activity, leading to a months-long reduction in seismic noise of up to 50%. The 2020 seismic noise quiet period is the longest and most prominent global anthropogenic seismic...
Article
The 15 January 2022 climactic eruption of Hunga volcano, Tonga, produced an explosion in the atmosphere of a size that has not been documented in the modern geophysical record. The event generated a broad range of atmospheric waves observed globally by various ground-based and spaceborne instrumentation networks. Most prominent is the surface-guide...
Article
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Global seismographic networks emerged during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, facilitated by seminal international developments in theory, technology, instrumentation, and data exchange. The mid- to late-20th century saw the creation of the World-Wide Standardized Seismographic Network (WWSSN; 1961) and International Deployment of Accelerome...
Article
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The eruption of the submarine Hunga Tonga-Hunga Haʻapai (Hunga Tonga) volcano on January 15, 2022, was one of the largest volcanic explosions recorded by modern geophysical instrumentation. The eruption was notable for the broad range of atmospheric wave phenomena it generated and for their unusual coupling with the oceans and solid Earth. The even...
Article
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains an archive of 189,180 digitized scans of analog seismic records from the World-Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN). Although these scans have been made public, the archive is too large to manually review, and few researchers have utilized large numbers of these records. To facilitate further res...
Article
Acoustic energy originating from explosions, sonic booms, bolides, and thunderclaps have been recorded on seismometers since the 1950s. Direct pressure loading from the passing acoustic wave has been modeled and consistently observed to produce ground deformations of the near surface that have retrograde elliptical particle motions. In the past dec...
Article
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The Global Seismographic Network (GSN)-a global network of ≈150 very broadband stations is used by researchers to study the free oscillations of the Earth (≈0.3-10 mHz) following large earthquakes. Normal-mode observations can provide information about the radial density and anisotropic velocity structure of the Earth (including near the core-mantl...
Article
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As seismologists continue to place more stringent demands on data quality, accurately described metadata are becoming increasingly important. In order to better constrain the orientation and sensitivities of seismometers deployed in U.S. Geological Survey networks, the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has recently begun identifying true n...
Article
Estimating the detection threshold of a seismic network (the minimum magnitude earthquake that can be reliably located) is a critical part of network design and can drive network maintenance efforts. The ability of a station to detect an earthquake is often estimated by assuming the spectral amplitude for an earthquake of a given size, assuming an...
Article
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The accuracy of timing across a seismic network is important for locating earthquakes as well as studies that use phase‐arrival information (e.g., tomography). The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) was designed with the goal of having reported timing be better than 10 ms. In this work, we provide a brief overview of how timing is kept across the G...
Article
Seismograms from the South Pole have been important for seismological observations for over six decades by providing (until 2007) the only continuous seismic records from the interior of the Antarctic continent. The South Pole, Antarctica station has undergone many updates over the years, including conversion to a digital recording station as part...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a multiuse, globally distributed seismic network used by seismologists, to both characterize earthquakes and study the Earth’s interior. Most stations in the network have two collocated broadband seismometers, which enable network operators to identify potential metadata and sensor issues. In this study, we...
Article
Full-text available
Variations in atmospheric pressure have long been known to introduce noise in long-period (>10 s) seismic records. This noise can overwhelm signals of interest such as normal modes and surface waves. Generally, this noise is most pronounced on the horizontal components where it arises due to tilting of the seismometer in response to changes in atmo...
Article
Seismometers are highly sensitive instruments to not only ground motion but also many other nonseismic noise sources (e.g., temperature, pressure, and magnetic field variations). We show that the Alaska component of the Transportable Array is particularly susceptible to recording magnetic storms and other space weather events because the sensors us...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) has been used extensively by seismologists to characterize large earthquakes and image deep earth structure. Although the network’s original design goals have been met, the seismological community has suggested that the incorporation of small-aperture seismic arrays at select sites may improve perfor- mance of...
Article
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Station noise levels play a fundamental limitation in our ability to detect seismic signals. These noise levels are frequency-dependent and arise from a number of physically different drivers. At periods greater than 100 s, station noise levels are often limited by the self-noise of the instrument as well as the sensitivity of the instrument to non...
Article
Full-text available
The Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) is host to a broadband, multimode seismic wavefield that is excited in response to atmospheric, oceanic and solid Earth source processes. A 34-station broadband seismographic network installed on the RIS from late 2014 through early 2017 produced continuous vibrational observations of Earth's largest ice shelf at both float...
Article
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Long-period Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical amplitude (H/V) ratios at a station provide information about local earth structure that is complementary to phase velocity. However, a number of studies have observed that significant scatter appears in these measurements making it difficult to use H/V ratio measurements to resolve earth structure....
Article
By coupling with the ground, wind causes ground motion that appears on seismic records as noise across a wide bandwidth. This wind-generated noise can drown out important features such as small earthquakes and prevent observation of normal modes from large earthquakes. Because the wind field is heterogeneous at local scales due to structures, diurn...
Article
The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has preserved a collection of photographs of seismographic equipment, stations, and drawings used by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in the early-to-mid-twentieth century. The photographs were transferred to ASL from the U.S. Department of Commerce building in Washington, D.C., after ASL be...
Article
From 1961 to 1996, the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) installed and operated the World-Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN). Each station within the network consisted of three Benioff short-period sensors and three Sprengnether Press-Ewing long-period sensors along with recording, timing, and calibration equipment. Approximatel...
Article
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Continuous seismic observations across the Ross Ice Shelf reveal ubiquitous ambient resonances at frequencies >5 Hz. These firn-trapped surface wave signals arise through wind and snow bedform interactions coupled with very low velocity structures. Progressive and long-term spectral changes are associated with surface snow redistribution by wind an...
Article
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Characterizing rotational motions from earthquakes at local distances has the potential to improve earthquake engineering and seismic gradiometry by better characterizing the complete seismic wavefield. Applied Technology Associates (ATA) has developed a proto-seismic magnetohydrodynamic (SMHD) three-component rotational rate sensor. We deploy two...
Article
To standardize parameters used in seismometer testing and calibration and to make these algorithms accessible to the seismological community, we have developed a new seismometer testing software package called Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) Sensor Test Suite. This software is written in Java and makes use of Seismological Exchange for E...
Article
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During the winter of 2014, a weak polar vortex brought record cold temperatures to the north-central (“Midwest”) United States, and the Great Lakes reached the highest extent of ice coverage (92.5%) since 1979. This event shut down the generation of seismic signals caused by wind-driven wave action within the lakes (termed “lake microseisms”), givi...
Article
We conduct a number of laboratory tests at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory to verify the self‐noise and fidelity in which 3 three‐component Fairfield Nodal Z‐Land, Generation 2, 5‐Hz sensors are able to record seismic signals. In addition to the incoherent self‐noise of the sensors, we estimate the sensitivity of the units in digital volts...
Article
Flow and sediment transport dynamics in fluvial systems play critical roles in shaping river morphology, in the design and use of societal river infrastructure, and in the broader management of watersheds. However, these properties are often difficult to measure comprehensively. Previous work has investigated using proximal seismic signals resultin...
Article
Isolating seismic instruments from temperature fluctuations is routine practice within the seismological community. However, the necessary degree of thermal stability required in broadband installations to avoid generating noise or compromising the fidelity in the seismic records is largely unknown and likely application dependent. To quantify the...
Article
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The lack of landmasses, climatological low pressure, and strong circumpolar westerly winds between the latitudes of 50∘ S to 65∘ S produce exceptional storm-driven wave conditions in the Southern Ocean. This combination makes the Antarctic Peninsula one of Earth's most notable regions of high amplitude wave activity and thus, ocean-swell driven mic...
Article
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An L-configured, three-component short period seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica during November 2014. Polarization analysis of ambient noise data from these stations shows linearly polarized waves for frequency bands between 0.2 and 2 Hz. A spectral peak at about 1.6 Hz is interpreted as the resonance frequency of the wat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
An L-shaped array of three-component short period seismic stations was deployed at the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica approximately 100 km south of the ice edge, near 180° longitude, from November 18 through 28, 2014. Polarization analysis of data from these stations clearly shows propagating waves from below the ice shelf for frequencies below 2 Hz. E...
Article
Two low-lying neutron-unbound excited states of O24, populated by proton-knockout reactions on F26, have been measured using the MoNA and LISA arrays in combination with the Sweeper Magnet at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at the NSCL using invariant mass spectroscopy. The current measurement confirms the separate identity of two states with decay...
Article
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Online Material: Table of station parameters; figures of mean acceleration power differences, interpolated noise maps. Seismographic coverage of Antarctica prior to 2007 consisted overwhelmingly of a handful of long running and sporadically deployed transient stations, many of which were principally collocated with scientific research stations. De...
Article
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We monitored geyser activity in the Lower Geyser Basin (LGB) of Yellowstone National Park with dual four-element microphone arrays separated by ~ 600 m. The arrays were independently used to identify incident coherent plane wave energy, then conjoint cross beam back-azimuths from the two arrays were used to precisely locate signal sources. During a...
Article
Full-text available
We utilize recently collected west (POLENET) and east Antarctic (AGAP) seismic data from temporary seismic networks, along with existing long-term and previous temporary Antarctic deployments of seismographs to characterize seismic noise across Antarctica, including substantial previously unsampled regions of the continental interior. Power spectra...
Article
The release of accumulated stresses along the plate interface of subduction zones has the potential to generate devastating megathrust earthquakes. Down-dip from the seismogenic zone where increasing temperatures, pressure and dehydration affect frictional behavior, episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been shown to occur in the transitional zone. Th...
Article
Numerical methods of simulating dissipative quantum systems were studied with an eye toward looking for evidence of quantum synchronization in Josephson Junction (JJ) arrays. JJs are of interest because of their potential application in quantum computing as quantum bits. Synchronization between JJs is an important step in realizing this application...

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