Robert N Anderson

Robert N Anderson
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | CDC · National Center for Health Statistics

PhD

About

126
Publications
20,211
Reads
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23,222
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1996 - present
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Education
September 1992 - August 1996
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Demography and Sociology
September 1990 - May 1992
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Sociology
August 1983 - May 1990

Publications

Publications (126)
Article
Full-text available
The CDC National Center for Health Statistics' (NCHS) National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) collects and reports annual mortality statistics using U.S. death certificate data. Because of the time needed to investigate certain causes of death and to process and review death data, final annual mortality data for a given year are typically released...
Article
The National Center for Health Statistics’ (NCHS’s) National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) collects, processes, codes, and reviews death certificate data and disseminates the data in annual data files and reports. With the global rise of COVID-19 in early 2020, the NCHS mobilized to rapidly respond to the growing need for reliable, accurate, and c...
Article
Background In the USA, COVID-19 vaccines became available in mid-December, 2020, with adults aged 65 years and older among the first groups prioritised for vaccination. We estimated the national-level impact of the initial phases of the US COVID-19 vaccination programme on COVID-19 cases, emergency department visits, hospital admissions, and deaths...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected Hispanic or Latino, non-Hispanic Black (Black), non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN), and non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (NH/PI) populations in the United States. These populations have experienced higher rates of infection and mortality compared with the...
Article
Full-text available
Background The American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Cancer Institute, and North American Association of Central Cancer Registries collaborate to provide annual updates on cancer incidence and mortality and trends by cancer type, sex, age group, and racial/ethnic group in the United States. In this report, we...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, older U.S. adults have been at increased risk for severe COVID-19-associated illness and death (1). On December 14, 2020, the United States began a nationwide vaccination campaign after the Food and Drug Administration's Emergency Use Authorization of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. The Advisory Committee on Immu...
Article
Approximately 375,000 deaths during 2020 were attributed to COVID-19 on death certificates reported to CDC (1). Concerns have been raised that some deaths are being improperly attributed to COVID-19 (2). Analysis of International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) diagnoses on official death certificates might provide an expedient...
Article
CDC's National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) collects and reports annual mortality statistics using data from U.S. death certificates. Because of the time needed to investigate certain causes of death and to process and review data, final annual mortality data for a given year are typically released 11 months after the end of the calendar year. Da...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives-This report expands the measures used to evaluate cause-of-death data quality by presenting a novel list of unsuitable underlying causes of death (UCOD). This list is intended to facilitate the measurement of the quality of cause-of-death reporting by medical certifiers in terms of completeness, as assessed by a UCOD that is sufficiently...
Article
What is already known about this topic? As of October 15, 216,025 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported in the United States; however, this might underestimate the total impact of the pandemic on mortality. What is added by this report? Overall, an estimated 299,028 excess deaths occurred from late January through October 3, 2020, with 198,081 (6...
Article
Background: The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries collaborate to provide annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. Methods: Data on new cancer diagnoses during 2001 through 2016 were obt...
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of trends in health data collected over time can be affected by instantaneous changes in coding that cause sudden increases/decreases, or “jumps,” in data. Despite these sudden changes, the underlying continuous trends can present valuable information related to the changing risk profile of the population, the introduction of screening, ne...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal mortality is a critical indicator of population health in both the United States and internationally (1-3). Monitoring maternal mortality over time is important to evaluate progress in improving maternal health in the United States, to make international comparisons, and to examine differences and inequities by demographic subgroup (3). Su...
Article
Full-text available
In 2017, 9% of all deaths were due to external causes. The percentage of deaths due to external causes was highest for those aged 15–24 years (79%) and lowest for those aged <1 year (8%) and aged >65 years (3%) at death. Among those aged 1–14 years, 44% of deaths were due to external causes, compared with 54% for those aged 25–44 years and 13% for...
Article
Full-text available
Unintentional injury is a leading cause of death in the United States. Higher death rates for unintentional injury have been reported in rural areas compared with urban areas. This report describes trends in the death rates for unintentional injuries and three leading causes of deaths due to unintentional injuries (motor vehicle traffic, drug overd...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Cancer Institute, and North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) provide annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends by cancer type, sex, race, ethnicity, and age in the US. This year's report highlights the cancer burden among me...
Book
Full-text available
This handbook contains instructions for funeral directors on completing and filing records of death and fetal death. These instructions apply to the 2003 revisions of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Death and the U.S. Standard Report of Fetal Death, and the 1992 revision of the Model State Vital Statistics Act and Regulations. This handbook is int...
Data
Supporting Table 1: Joinpoint incidence trends for top 15 cancers for all races/ethnicities combined by sex, 1999–2014 Supporting Table 2. Joinpoint mortality trends for the most common cancers, all races and ethnicities combined, by sex, 1999‐2015*
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND Temporal trends in prostate cancer incidence and death rates have been attributed to changing patterns of screening and improved treatment (mortality only), among other factors. This study evaluated contemporary national‐level trends and their relations with prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence and explored trends in incide...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate to provide annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. METHODS Incidence data were obtained from the C...
Article
Full-text available
From 2000 to 2015, death rates for chronic liver disease and cirrhosis in the United States increased 31% (from 20.1 per 100,000 to 26.4) among persons aged 45–64 years. Rates in that age group increased 21% for men (from 29.8 to 36.2) and 57% for women (from 10.8 to 17.0). Among persons aged 25–44 years, the death rate for men decreased 10% (from...
Article
Drug poisoning mortality more than doubled in the United States from 2000 to 2015; poisoning mortality involving opioids more than tripled.¹,2 Increases in poisonings have been reported to have reduced life expectancy for non-Hispanic white individuals in the United States from 2000 to 2014.³ Specific contributions of drug, opioid, and alcohol pois...
Article
Full-text available
Problem/condition: Previous reports have shown that persons living in nonmetropolitan (rural or urban) areas in the United States have higher death rates from all cancers combined than persons living in metropolitan areas. Disparities might vary by cancer type and between occurrence and death from the disease. This report provides a comprehensive...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate to provide annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. This Annual Report highlights survival rates. M...
Article
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Although those identifying as “Hispanic or Latino” experience lower adult mortality than the more socioeconomically advantaged non-Hispanic white population, the ethnic category Hispanic conceals variation by country of origin, nativity, age, and immigration experience. The current analysis examines adult mortality differentials among 12 Hispanic s...
Article
Death rates by specific causes vary across the 50 states and the District of Columbia.* Information on differences in rates for the leading causes of death among states might help state health officials determine prevention goals, priorities, and strategies. CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data to provide national and state-specific e...
Article
Introduction Heart disease and cancer are the first and second leading causes of death in the United States. Age-standardized death rates (risk) have declined since the 1960s for heart disease and for cancer since the 1990s, whereas the overall number of heart disease deaths declined and cancer deaths increased. We analyzed mortality data to evalua...
Article
Full-text available
Death rates by specific causes vary across the 50 states and the District of Columbia.* Information on differences in rates for the leading causes of death among states might help state health officials determine prevention goals, priorities, and strategies. CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data to provide national and state-specific e...
Article
Full-text available
The death rate for children and teens aged 1–19 years caused by leukemia decreased by 33%, from 0.85 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 0.57 in 2014. The brain cancer death rate fluctuated from 1999 to 2014, but remained statistically stable (0.68 in 1999 and in 2014). For all other cancer types, death rates for children and teens aged 1–19 years de...
Article
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Since the mid-1970s, cancer death rates among children and adolescents in the United States showed marked declines despite a slow increase in incidence for some of the major types (1–3). These trends have previously been shown through 2012. This data brief extends previous research by showing trends in cancer death rates through 2014 among children...
Conference Paper
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Background In literature on intentional self-harm behaviour it is often stated that suicide is one of the leading causes of death, nationally or worldwide. Ranking causes of death is a method used to illustrate the relative burden of cause-specific mortality and is often used to present arguments for research funding, prevention and treatment. The...
Article
Background In the United States (US), national data on child maltreatment (CM) deaths are compiled from state child welfare agencies; approximaly 1600 CM deaths are reported for all 50 states annually. Unfortunately, these child welfare data grossly undercount fatal CM in the US. This project used data from death certificates and child death review...
Article
Full-text available
Key findings Data from the National Vital Statistics System ● Heart disease has consistently been the leading cause of death in the United States and remained so in 2014. ● The gap between the number of heart disease and cancer deaths generally widened from 1950 through 1968, narrowed from 1968 through 2012, and then slightly widened again from 201...
Article
Background: Annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States are provided through an ongoing collaboration among the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR). This annual repor...
Article
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Inability to invest in and develop mortality information systems has been considered the single most critical failure in health information systems and there is a recognized urgent need to improve mortality statistics and cause of death information. Although there have been major developments in information technology with the potential to improve...
Article
Full-text available
Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality • The gap in life expectancy between the black and white populations decreased 2.3 years between 1999 and 2013 (5.9 to 3.6 years). • The decrease in the gap was due to larger decreases in death rates for the black population for heart disease, cancer, and HIV disease. • The gap in life expec...
Article
Full-text available
Key findings: The Hispanic population in the United States has lower overall mortality and higher life expectancy at birth than the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations. The expectation has been that the Hispanic population should exhibit a mortality profile that is similar to that of the non-Hispanic black population, not one tha...
Article
Full-text available
Problem Before 2003 there was substantial underreporting of deaths in Jordan. The death notification form did not comply with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines and information on the cause of death was often missing, incomplete or inaccurate. Approach A new mortality surveillance system to determine the causes of death was implemented in...
Article
Full-text available
The American Cancer Society (ACS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to produce updated, national cancer statistics. This Annual Report includes a focus on breast cancer incidence by subtype using new, national-...
Article
Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) accounted for 1 in 3 postneonatal deaths in 2010. Sudden infant death syndrome and accidental sleep-related suffocation are among the most frequently reported types of SUID. The causes of these SUID usually are not obvious before a medico-legal investigation and may remain unexplained even after investigation....
Article
Full-text available
In 2010, the top five causes of death in the United States were 1) diseases of the heart, 2) cancer, 3) chronic lower respiratory diseases, 4) cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), and 5) unintentional injuries. The rates of death from each cause vary greatly across the 50 states and the District of Columbia (2). An understanding of state differences...
Article
Background: The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updates on cancer incidence and death rates and trends in these outcomes for the United States. This year'...
Article
Full-text available
Racial misclassification is a well-documented weakness of mortality data taken from death certificates. As a result, mortality statistics for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) present, at best, an inaccurate and misleading assessment of mortality in this population. Studies evaluating the quality of race/ethnicity reporting on death cert...
Article
Full-text available
Key findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality In 2010, life expectancy for the black population was 3.8 years lower than that of the white population. This difference was due to higher death rates for the black population for heart disease, cancer, homicide, diabetes, and perinatal conditions. Life expectancy for black ma...
Article
Full-text available
Extrapolation from studies in the 1980s suggests that smoking causes 25% of deaths among women and men 35 to 69 years of age in the United States. Nationally representative measurements of the current risks of smoking and the benefits of cessation at various ages are unavailable. We obtained smoking and smoking-cessation histories from 113,752 wome...
Article
Full-text available
Background The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updates on cancer incidence and death rates and trends in these outcomes for the United States. This year’s...
Article
Objective: This report, following publication of the national life tables (1,2) for 1999-2001, presents state-specific life tables for the 50 states and District of Columbia by race (white and black) and sex. These tables are the most recent in a series of decennial life tables for the United States. Methods: Data used to prepare these state-spe...
Article
Full-text available
Eliminating socioeconomic disparities in health is an overarching goal of the U.S. Healthy People decennial initiatives. We present recent trends in mortality by education among working-aged populations. Age-standardized death rates and their average annual percent change for all-cause and five major causes (cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes,...
Data
Full-text available
Trends in Age-Standardized Death Rates from All Causes and Five Major Causes by Educational Attainment among Non-Hispanic Whites in 26 U.S. States, 1993–2007. (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Trends in Age-Standardized Death Rates from All Causes and Five Major Causes by Educational Attainment among Non-Hispanic Blacks in 26 U.S. States, 1993–2007. (PDF)
Article
Background: Mortality rates continue to increase for liver, esophagus, and pancreatic cancers in non-Hispanic whites and for liver cancer in non-Hispanic blacks. However, the extent to which trends vary by socioeconomic status (SES) is unknown. Methods: We calculated age-standardized death rates for liver, esophagus, and pancreas cancers for non...
Article
Background: Annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States are provided through collaboration between the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR). This year's report highlig...
Article
We compared written text on infant death certificates for deaths coded as sudden infant death syndrome (R95), unknown cause (R99), and accidental suffocation (W75). Using US mortality files supplemented with the death certifiers' written text for all infant deaths with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 assigned codes R95, R99, and W...
Article
In 2008, the number of poisoning deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic deaths and was the leading cause of injury death for the fi rst time since at least 1980. During the past three decades, the poisoning death rate nearly tripled, while the motor vehicle traffic death rate decreased by one-half. During this period, the percentage of...
Article
Full-text available
The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. This year's report highlights brain and other nervous sys...
Chapter
Accurate, comparable, and timely cause-of-death information is important for assessing population health and for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public-health strategies. Unfortunately, these criteria are not always met. Researchers need a clear understanding of how cause-of-death data are collected, classified and coded, and presen...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to examine the changes in frequency of reporting improper diabetes-related cause-of-death statements on death certificates based on Multiple-Cause Mortality Files of the United States from 1985 to 2005. An algorithm was developed to identify the causes of death with incorrect causal sequences by using decision tables developed by t...
Article
The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information regarding cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. This year's report includes trends in colore...
Article
To examine cause-of-death terminology written on death certificates for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and to determine the adequacy of this text data in more fully describing circumstances potentially contributing to SIDS deaths. With 2003 and 2004 US mortality files, we analyzed all deaths that were assigned the underlying cause-of-death cod...