Rita Singer

Rita Singer
Aberystwyth University | AU · Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

26
Publications
1,731
Reads
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9
Citations
Introduction
I am a researcher with a special interest in Welsh writing in English and the history and culture of Wales. I taught seminars at undergraduate and post-graduate levels on these subjects. I have a record of publications in peer-reviewed international journals and anthologies. For my full work profile, most recent publications, article copies and academic blog, please see my HCommons page: https://hcommons.org/members/ritasinger/
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Aberystwyth University
Position
  • Project Manager
Description
  • The ERDF-funded project 'Ports Past and Present' will develop new tourism opportunities between five port towns and the surrounding communities of Dublin, Rosslare, Holyhead, Fishguard and Pembroke Dock.
February 2018 - September 2019
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
Position
  • Community Engagement Officer
Description
  • Collaboration with maritime museums and community groups throughout Wales in researching and commemorating the submarine war in Welsh waters during the First World War
February 2018 - present
Bangor University
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Fellowship awarded in February 2018 in recognition of previous work for the European Travellers to Wales project
Education
January 2006 - June 2006
Bangor University
Field of study
  • English Literature
September 2003 - September 2008
University of Leipzig
Field of study
  • I: British Studies; II: German as a Foreign Language

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
For the Welsh middle classes, the 1850s were defined by a continuous struggle against English stereotypes that imagined Wales as a nation of promiscuous drunkards, incapable of self-rule and a burden for Britain. Whereas the Welsh press aggressively rebuffed such frequent accusations as soon as they sprung up, it took another 10 years before anglop...
Article
Full-text available
Visitors’ books not only trace developments in modern tourism, but they also reveal changes in the socio-cultural and language attitudes of travellers from all walks of life over prolonged periods of time. This article investigates messages in visitors’ books from Wales from the mid-nineteenth century up to the present and argues for their recognit...
Article
Full-text available
Taking the development of picturesque tourism in Wales since the publication of William Gilpin’s Observations on the River Wye (1782) as point of departure, this article examines three Anglophone illustrated travel accounts by French tourists during the Romantic period, focusing on the co-occurrence of text and images as they may confirm, destabili...
Chapter
Die Geschichte kontinentaleuropäischer Reiseliteratur über Wales wurde erst kürzlich als Kooperation zwischen Bangor University, dem University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies und Swansea University im interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekt European Travellers to Wales, 1750-2010 beleuchtet. Dabei entstand die Datenbank Accounts...
Article
Full-text available
Book Reviews M. Wynn Thomas, The Nations of Wales 1890–1914 (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2016). Pp. 323. Huw Osborne (ed.), Queer Wales: The History, Culture and Politics of Queer Life in Wales, Gender Studies in Wales (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2016). Pp. 272. John Pikoulis, Alun, Gweno and Freda (Bridgend: Seren, 2015). Pp. 397...
Chapter
Rob the Red-Hand is a manslayer who spends his life hiding away in the rough mountain uplands of Merionethshire. When he witnesses a gang of smugglers brutally assaulting young Janet Meredith, Rob steps from the shadows and helps his estranged nephew Reginald to free her from her kidnappers. When Romantic literature fell in love with the Scottish...
Chapter
A light-hearted mother, a free-spirited noble patron and a blushing young sweetheart—young Twm Shôn Catti from Tregaron has it all. But one day, his mischievous temper gets the better of him and he is forced to become an outlaw. Taking to the road as Welsh incarnation of Robin Hood, Twm outwits many traps set by the arm of the law, lampoons his soc...
Chapter
Set during the Wars of the Roses in the fifteenth century, Gladys of Harlech tells the story of the granddaughter of the last Welsh keeper of Harlech Castle. Fighting on the side of the House of Lancaster, Gladys and her family flee into hiding in the mountains after the castle falls into the hands of the rival Yorkists at the end of a long siege....
Article
For centuries, continental Europeans have come to Wales for numerous reasons. During the Romantic period some came seeking a rural idyll, whilst others in the Victorian era travelled as industrial spies, and during times of war many refugees escaped to Wales to find shelter from persecution. Not only have continental Europeans left their traces amo...
Book
Resources for KS2 & 3 that include information and interactive exercises based on works of art by refugees that came to Wales. They were produced as part of the AHRC-funded project European Travellers to Wales. http://hwb.wales.gov.uk/Resources/resource/95514aba-1550-4128-b5ad-f770739601c2/en
Article
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Since the 1980s German-language travel writing reflects a stable interest in the life and writings of Dylan Thomas. Predominantly, Swansea and Laugharne represent the heart and essence of ‘Dylan Thomas Country’ in these accounts. However, these travel writers also find the south Walian poet among the slate tips of Snowdonia and the abandoned copper...
Conference Paper
German-speaking travellers have long shown great interest in Wales. In 1780, the Swiss painter Samuel Hieronymous Grimm explored Wales in search of picturesque landscapes and ruined castles and churches. Throughout the nineteenth century, Wales was at the forefront of industrial progress and invention and German travel writing was rife with ecstati...
Conference Paper
About two hundred years ago, the advent of steam-powered railways and the improvement of the road system not only transformed travelling from a pastime of luxury to a commodity, but also attracted more and more European travellers to the previously less accessible parts of Wales. It is from around this time that a Swiss mountaineer found himself sp...
Article
Full-text available
http://myblogs.informa.com/jvc/2013/04/29/strange-new-today
Book
Full-text available
Was ist eigentlich der Orient? Auf der Landkarte sucht man das Wort jedenfalls vergeblich, trotzdem gibt es orientali­sche Märchen, Musik und Mode. Aber schon bei „Chicken tikka“ und Döner Kebab wird es schwierig. Diese scheinbar simple Frage nach dem Orient ist also bei genauerer Be­trachtung plötzlich gar nicht mehr so einfach zu beant­worten. D...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Specifically I am looking for lists that may be able to identify anonymous contributors to The Edinburgh Magazine and The European Magazine and London Review during the 1820s and early 1830s. I have consulted The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals, 1824-1900, but it didn't return the desired info on Thomas Richards (1800-1877). It lists some contributions to other magazines, but the ones I'm looking for.
Thanks in advance for any leads.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
Llyfrau Cantre’r Gwaelod is an offshoot of CSP-Cymru Cyf., established in 2016 with the aim of bringing back into print lost Welsh literary classics of the nineteenth century. Its volumes incorporate a scholarly edition of the original texts, with an accompanying introduction. Jane Aaron, Emeritus Professor at the University of South Wales, is the series editor, and Rita Singer, Research Fellow at the University of Bangor, edited and introduced its two inaugural publications, T. J. Llewelyn Prichard’s The Adventures and Vagaries of Twm Shôn Catti (1st edition, 1828) and Thomas Richards’ Rob the Red-hand and other Stories of Welsh Society and Scenery (selected from Richards’ publications in British and Tasmanian periodicals of the 1820s and 1830s). https://celticstudies.wales/llyfrau-cantrer-gwaelod
Project
'European Travellers to Wales 1750-2010' is a three-year AHRC-funded project that began in 2013, and is a collaboration between Professor Carol Tully of Bangor University, Dr Kathryn Jones from Swansea University and Dr Heather Williams from the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (CAWCS). It is led by Bangor University. It has a full-time Research Officer, Dr Rita Singer, based at CAWCS in Aberystwyth, and two PhD students, Anna-Lou Dijsktra (Swansea) and Christina Les (Bangor). The project has uncovered a vast number of travel accounts to Wales in this period, the majority of which are written in French or German. Many of the accounts that are listed in the database were ‘hidden’ in writing about tours in England. ‘European Travellers’ investigated an array of sources including travelogues, guidebooks, diaries, letters and blogs, in both manuscript and printed form. The researchers discovered a broad variety of reasons for European travellers to have come to Wales: from those seeking a romantic idyll, to industrial spies in the Victorian era and refugees from Nazi Germany. This helps us understand Wales better: stories of refugees and exiles have emerged, and a store of detailed descriptions of Welsh landscapes, buildings and ruins has emerged. These are completely new resources for studying Wales, and broaden travel writing to encompass more than English-language portrayals of Wales.