Rinse Willet

Rinse Willet
KU Leuven | ku leuven · Department of Archaeology

Doctor of Archaeology

About

25
Publications
6,031
Reads
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95
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
74 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022051015
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2016201720182019202020212022051015
Introduction
I currently work at the Sagalassos Archaeological Research Project of the KU Leuven. My research interests lie in Roman and Hellenistic Archaeology, Roman History, Urbanism, Asia Minor and Greece within the context of the wider Eastern Mediterranean. He is associated with the ERC funded project 'An Empire of 2000 Cities' and the ICRATES (Inventory of Crafts and Trade in the Roman East) project.
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - March 2019
KU Leuven
Position
  • Managing Director

Publications

Publications (25)
Book
Full-text available
This volume discusses the geography of cities of the Eastern Mediterranean that existed under the Roman Empire. Roman urbanism has a long historiography, however, many previous studies saw the ancient town as an isolated historical phenomenon, or at best as an index of the spread of Hellenism or Romanitas. This volume attempts to take a step furthe...
Book
The Geography of Urbanism in Roman Asia Minor investigates how Roman urbanism manifested itself in Asia Minor during the first three centuries CE, particularly with regards to its spatial patterning over the landscape and the administrative, economic and cultural functions cities fulfilled, and how cities developed in terms of size and monumentalit...
Chapter
Roman Asia Minor was a vast area and its ‘cities’ comprised a wide array of settlement types. Although this variety is due in part to the fact that ‘cities’ can be defined in multiple ways, for instance based on juridical, functional or demographic criteria, even if we use a single definition, enormous variations can be observed. In this chapter no...
Article
http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue50/17/index.html Although the study of tablewares has a long history in the Roman East, research has been hindered by the relatively few, and only very recent, interdisciplinary research projects that study and publish their tableware in depth. But in the last decades, advanced provenancing techniques, combined wi...
Article
Full-text available
More than two decades of archaeological research at the site of Sagalassos, in southwest Turkey, resulted in the study of the former urban settlement in all its features. Originally settled in late Classical/early Hellenistic times, possibly from the later fifth century BCE onwards, the city of Sagalassos and its surrounding territory saw empires c...
Data
1 supplementary text file with a detailed description of the methods used in the present study.
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses and discusses three statistical methods to describe the diachronic development and distribution of the Roman ceramic tableware Eastern Sigillata A (ESA). These methods distribute the data over time based on the typo-chronological properties of the vessels. A linear distribution method was already devised in the late 1980's and...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper will give an overview of tableware and its distribution in the Roman East during the fourth and fifth centuries. In the Roman period tableware is made from a variety of materials, varying from wood to ceramics and crystal.1 The term “tableware” implies a function related to consuming food. Although this can be considered the primary func...
Article
Full-text available
The reconstruction of population-levels for ancient cities is a difficult undertaking. Many methods are present in the literature, each with their own (dis)advantages. This paper presents an illustration on the methodological issues encountered in the reconstruction of the population-levels of an ancient city. The city of Corinth is used as an exam...
Article
Full-text available
Of all artefacts of the Roman period, few are so numerously represented as (the remains of) ceramic vessels. The quantities of recovered sherds of amphorae, cooking vessels, lamps, tableware, etc. are both a blessing and a curse. A blessing, since all these sherds are considered to result from ancient socioeconomic and socio-cultural activity and c...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Advancing the understanding of urbanism and municipalisation during the Roman period.