Rima Wilkes

Rima Wilkes
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Sociology

PH.D.

About

76
Publications
44,643
Reads
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2,176
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
1434 Citations
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Introduction
Rima Wilkes currently works at the Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia - Vancouver. Wilkes does research in Communication and Media, Quantitative Social Research and Visual Sociology. Their most recent publication is 'Trust and Minority Groups.' She is the current President of the Canadian Sociological Association.
Additional affiliations
January 2002 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Full-text available
Americans’ trust in government is lower than ever. However, while all groups have seen a decline in trust since the 1960s, the gap in trust between racial and ethnic minorities and Whites in this period has varied not only in size but also in direction. At times, racial and ethnic minorities have actually had higher rates of trust than Whites, cont...
Article
Full-text available
What is the relationship between trust and the quality of political institutions in a society? According to an influential cultural perspective, social trust—the belief that most people can be trusted—is a value inculcated during individuals’ formative years, and remains fixed afterward. A second perspective holds that social trust reflects experie...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely held that positional characteristics such as gender, age, education and race reflect experience. Here I draw attention to the fact that the understanding of how these and other positional characteristics matter is pre-determined by the theoretical positionality that we forget about. To show that theorizing is to take a position (on pos...
Article
Full-text available
National models of integration are widely used to understand the relationship between nationalism and integration-immigration policies. In this methodological article, we highlight two key concerns. First, national models of integration emerged out of inductive and normative case studies. The analytical value of models which are based on inductive...
Chapter
In this chapter we provide an overview of approaches to social capital and subjective well-being and outline the organization of the book. Recognizing the multifaceted nature of social capital, we propose a broad interpretation of social capital which, along with trust and networks, incorporate pro-civic orientations. We analyze the impact of socia...
Chapter
This chapter summarizes the main findings presented in the volume. The volume investigates similarity of social capital and well-being trends in different geographical locations and test stability of associations between social capital, well-being and their determinants across time-points, countries and regions. Overall, the book further contribute...
Article
Full-text available
Trust is critical to collaborative governance, including of natural resources. Existing frameworks variously emphasize the impact of individual propensity, interpersonal dynamics, and institutional characteristics on trust. However, few frameworks consider the impacts of these influences on trust simultaneously. This study uses a survey of 51 repre...
Article
Full-text available
While foreign pundits have alternatively blamed and praised the Chinese government’s handling of the COVID-19 virus, little is known about how citizens within China understand this performance. This article considers how satisfied Chinese citizens are with their government’s performance during the COVID-19 pandemic. It first considers the impact of...
Article
Reconciliation continues to capture the attention of institutions across Canada. Still questions around how to define and how to pursue it remain. The Canadian Sociological Association’s Decolonization sub-committee was formed to provide insight and guidance into the increasing complexities that departments of Sociology must navigate as they pursue...
Article
Full-text available
The US has experienced a substantial decline in social trust in recent decades. Surprisingly few studies analyze whether individual-level explanations can account for this decrease. We use three-wave panel data from the General Social Survey (2006-2014) to study the effects of four possible individual-level sources of changes in social trust: job l...
Article
Several literatures including those focusing on settler colonialism, critical antiracism as well as ethnic studies and sociology more broadly often position racial injustice and genocide as a struggle against whiteness and white supremacy. Here I use my own positionality to illustrate what might be unseen in the current thinking about the meaning o...
Book
This book presents a cross-cultural investigation into the interplay between social capital and subjective well-being. Based on a quantitative analysis of the latest large-N cross-cultural data sets, including the World Value Survey and the European Social Survey, and covering various countries, it offers a comparative perspective on and new insigh...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we consider how, due to a spike in anti-Asian hate crimes, Asians might face a disproportionate mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Analyzing data from the University of Southern California’s Center for Economic and Social Research Understanding Coronavirus in America survey, we report several findings. First, since the...
Article
Full-text available
Subtle gender dynamics in the publishing process involving collaboration, peer-review, readership, citation, and media coverage disadvantage women in academia. In this study we consider whether commenting on published work is also gendered. Using all the comments published over a 16-year period in PNAS (N = 869) and Science (N = 481), we find that...
Article
Several literatures including those focusing on settler colonialism, critical antiracism as well as ethnic studies and sociology more broadly often position racial injustice and genocide as a struggle against whiteness and white supremacy. Here I use my own positionality to illustrate what might be unseen in the current thinking about the meaning o...
Article
Full-text available
Many immigrants experience discrimination. In this paper we consider how discrimination affects their trust. We make a theoretical case for a formal mediation approach to studying the immigration, discrimination, and trust relationship. This approach shifts attention to the basic fact that the overall levels of discrimination experienced by differe...
Article
Housework is asymmetrically distributed by gender. This uneven allocation is an important indicator of inequality between women and men. The imbalance is closing, although exactly why remains uncertain. It is also unclear if the convergence has more to do with women's lives becoming more like men's, or whether it is because men are changing their p...
Article
Full-text available
Cities, all over the world, have become more diverse than ever. This poses great challenges to urban studies and theorising. In this article, we review current debates in urban theory through Howitt’s (1998) three-facet conceptualisation of geographical scale and find that urban theorists have high levels of disagreement on the areal (scale as size...
Article
Full-text available
Why do ethnic and racialized minorities have lower trust? While previous research emphasizes individual factors such as the national and cultural origins of ethnic groups, this paper draws attention to the ethnic majority-minority relationship. We argue that ethnic differences in trust are a function of the power dynamics underlying this relationsh...
Article
Full-text available
How can declining political trust in Western democracies be explained, especially, when it remains stable and high in authoritarian societies? Underlying this question is a debate about whether political trust represents a diffuse orientation toward the political system as a whole or a specific assessment of incumbent performance. This article argu...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter we consider the patterns of social and political trust on the basis of ethnoracial identification. Concerning social trust, the vast majority of individuals in ethnoracial minority groups trust less than majority group members. Although a large body of research attributes this to institutional rather than cultural effects, in practi...
Article
Research on international student’s post migration plans treats migration as a binary stay-return category and focuses on push-pull factors as the cause of this migration. In this paper we expand the definition of migration and consider the role of life experiences and aspirations, particularly the concept of home. We ask, what are the different co...
Article
Full-text available
Is political trust in China anomalous? In most countries there are systematic differences in the level of trust in national and local government that take one of three patterns. In some countries, individuals trust the national government more than local government (hierarchical trust); in others individuals trust local government more than nationa...
Article
At many Canadian universities it is now common to publicly acknowledge Indigenous lands, treaties, and peoples. Yet, this practice has yet to be considered as a subject of scholarly inquiry. How does this practice vary and why? In this paper we describe the content and practice of acknowledgment, linking this content to treaty relationships (or lac...
Article
Full-text available
As part of its 'white Canada' policy, Canadian officials denied entry to 376 Indian immigrants who arrived aboard the Komagata Maru in 1914. Although the Komagata Maru affair was among the first Canadian immigration controversies to generate international media coverage, little is known about the nature of this coverage. In this paper, we examine t...
Article
Full-text available
Trust is widely considered as foundational to all social relationships. In a recent article, Schilke et al. (1) conducted four experiments in which they manipulated participants’ relative power position and then measured how this affected perceptual and behavioral trust. Their results consistently demonstrate that, in an exchange relationship, indi...
Article
Each year, I write letters of reference for undergraduate students applying to master's and Ph.D. programs; law school; and programs in social work, architecture, and medicine. I write letters to help them win awards, internships, and placements in study abroad programs. I write letters for graduate
Article
Full-text available
Group threat theory understands prejudice as a manifestation of the threat, either actual or assumed, that minority groups pose to majority groups. This theory is often operationalized by analyzing the impact of group size on anti-immigrant prejudice. We test this hypothesis with a new dataset documenting 487 effects of group size on prejudice prov...
Article
Full-text available
Visual media have long been instrumental in the production of international borders as sites of spectacle. Such projects involve careful delineations of who may enter and under what conditions. In Canada, this representation often centres on a dialectical relationship between a welcoming and generous, multicultural nation and a threatening foreign...
Article
Full-text available
This paper considers how changes in the keywords used in the headlines and captions change the implied meaning of political conflict imagery. Drawing on the media and social movement framing literature, I argue that changes in the text could prompt a visually crystallized and uniform reading of imagery or a visually pluralist and diverse reading of...
Article
Full-text available
To date, the political trust literature has been bifurcated along micro–macro lines. Some scholars have studied differences in political trust across individuals, while others have studied aggregate political trust levels over time. In this paper, I propose a micro–macro model that joins the two. I use the model and data from the 1958–2008 American...
Article
Media exposure is widely known to increase institutional forms of political participation such as voting. Less well understood is whether media exposure also affects protest, a less institutional form of engagement. This paper examines the mechanics through which this relationship operates by considering the media's direct and indirect effect on vo...
Article
Full-text available
Iconic news photographs, particularly those taken during wars and national crises, provide visual synopses of important historical events – events about which stories of triumph and tragedy are superimposed. In this paper, we systematically trace the appearances and discussions of a single, iconic image, given the moniker Face to Face, over time. I...
Article
Full-text available
The media is widely held as a force that both shapes and reflects how citizens think about immigrants and immigration. This article explores two recent developments in the literature on media coverage of immigrants and immigration: the application of Hegelian dialectical theory to the study of discourses about immigration; and a debate concerning t...
Chapter
Most of British Columbia is Aboriginal territory. It is Aboriginal territory because indigenous peoples have never ceded their land or rights via treaties. According to the 1763 Royal Proclamation, treaty-making is the only way the crown (or government) can acquire territory. Despite this legal rule, the government in British Columbia has sold Abor...
Article
Full-text available
Images of collective action shape public understanding of social movement campaigns and issues. Modern media includes more images than ever before, and these images are remembered longer and are more likely to elicit emotional responses than are textual accounts. Yet when it comes to media coverage of collective action, existing research considers...
Article
Why does public opinion change over time? Much debate on this question centers on whether it is caused by the replacement of people or by individuals changing how they think. Theoretical approaches to this question have emphasized the importance of birth cohort succession, generational differences, and changing macro-economic conditions. In this ar...
Article
Full-text available
Les personnes autochtones au Canada se sont lancées dans des centaines d'actions collectives. Utilisant la littérature sur les nouvelles et sur les événements collectifs, nous examinons d'une façon systématique les facteurs associés avec le nombre d'articles, leur placement sur la premiére page, et l'inclusion de photos. Nous trouvons que l'augment...
Article
Full-text available
It is not that reporters and editors are consciously seeking to delegitimize collective actors, but rather that the process of creating the news often leads to this result.Coverage of indigenous peoples’ collective action in Canada and the United States has been predominantly delegitimizing: stories overwhelm-ingly emphasize militancy and violence.
Article
In this paper we examine how individual-level characteristics and national context affect attitudes toward immigration. Although many previous studies have compared attitudes toward immigration across countries, little attention has been paid to how attitudes may be affected by changes within a country over time. We take advantage of seventeen nati...
Article
Full-text available
Minority group members who face threats to their security have a number of options: they can stay in their country of origin and fight for social and political change; they can choose to emigrate, finding comfort and safety across an international border; they can participate in insurgency activities and leave their country of residence; or they ca...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate the association between the residential concentration of Chinese in Toronto and discrimination as experienced and perceived by Chinese immigrant residents. A unique aspect of this study is our focus on perceived employment discrimination. We find that Chinese immigrants living in neighbourhoods with a high concentration of other Chin...
Article
Newspapers are a widely used source of data about collective action and social movements. In this study, we build upon a growing body of literature that critically assesses the coverage that newspapers provide of protest. We consider coverage in relation to a set of protest events that have yet to be considered in the literature (protest by Indigen...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous peoples in both Canada and the United States have engaged in numerous protests. Nevertheless, although these protests led to an ongoing national social movement in the United States, this has not been the case in Canada. This article draws on the sociological literature of social movements to explain this difference. Both cases have some...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial assimilation theory predicts that racial and ethnic residential segregation results at least in part from socioeconomic differences across groups. In contrast, the place stratification perspective emphasizes the role of prejudice and discrimination in shaping residential patterns. This article evaluates these perspectives by examining the r...
Article
Event analysis is methodology that has been widely used to study collective behaviors by multiple groups around the world. However, event analysis has never been systematically applied in the study of indigenous politics. In this paper, the advantages of event analysis are demonstrated through its application to band-level political mobilization in...
Article
Full-text available
How are levels of deprivation and resources associated with participation by First Nations in collective action? Although previous studies have focused on the relationship between deprivation, resources and the timing of protest, surprisingly few have used these concepts to address the issue of participation in protest. This paper presents the resu...
Article
Full-text available
We used metropolitan-level data from the 2000 U.S. census to analyze the hypersegregation of four groups from whites: blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. While blacks were hypersegregated in 29 metropolitan areas and Hispanics were hypersegregated in 2, Asians and Native Americans were not hypersegregated in any. There were declines in...
Article
The aim of this study is to understand how city factors explain racial and ethnic residential patterns in contemporary multiethnic cities. We examined residential patterns among 17 groups in 12 Canadian cities. The results suggest that we should be cautious in taking factors derived from literature based largely on European experiences at the begin...
Article
Full-text available
Are Native Americans segregated within urban areas in the United States? To date, the issue of urban segregation has been considered in reference to all racial groups with the exception of Native Americans. This paper addresses that gap by presenting the results from an analysis of 1990 U.S. Census data. The spatial assimilation and the metropolita...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we use the Minorities at Risk dataset to examine the effects of five forms of ethnic competition (demographic, ecological, political, cultural, and economic) on multiple types of mobilization (communal conflict, rebellion, and protest). Overall, we find that measures of competition predicted communal conflict between groups rather...
Article
Full-text available
this report. A Possible Spatial Component: Is There a "Double Digital Divide" The literature that we have reviewed about the digital divide in North America focuses on differences between people, such as socioeconomic and gender differences. To some extent, these are joined with discussions about household differences, such as family wealth. Yet ex...
Article
Given the theoretical importance and policy implications of the spatial assimilation model, it is surprising that few studies have carefully and empirically examined the relationship of the three key variables in the model that has been used to explain the process of neighborhood attainment among immigrants, i.e., neighborhood environments, socioec...
Article
Given the theoretical importance and policy implications of the spatial assimilation model, it is surprising that few studies have carefully and empirically examined the relationship of the three key variables in the model that has been used to explain the process of neighborhood attainment among immigrants, i.e., neighborhood environments, socioec...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This paper explores an emerging,common,phenomenon,of new immigrant,groups,clustering in suburban,areas. We argue that the households of new immigrant groups are concerned with neighborhood safety. They are attracted to suburban neighborhoods which generally have lower crime rates. Since suburban neighborhoods,have become,more heterogeneous...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Toronto, 2001. Includes bibliographical references.

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Project
This project aims to understand the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for social inequality and population mental health, with a focus on China, the United States, and Canada.