Riley Andrade

Riley Andrade
University of Florida | UF · Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Geography

About

32
Publications
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263
Citations

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
The participation of local communities in management decisions is critically important to the long-term salience and therefore, success, of protected areas. Engaging community members in meaningful ways requires knowledge of their behavior and its antecedents, particularly values. Understanding how learning influences cooperation in conservation in...
Article
The impacts of urbanization on bird biodiversity depend on human–environment interactions that drive land management. Although a commonly studied group, less attention has been given to public perceptions of birds close to home, which can capture people's direct, everyday experiences with urban biodiversity. Here, we used ecological and social surv...
Article
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The draft Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework commits to achievement of equity and justice outcomes and represents a “relational turn” in how we understand inclusive conservation. Although “inclusivity” is drawn on as a means to engage diverse stakeholders, widening the framing of inclusivity can create new tensions with regard to how to manage...
Article
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Animals from urban areas are regularly brought into wildlife rehabilitation centers, providing untapped potential data records to inform management of wildlife species. Although rescues may be considered a wildlife stewardship behavior, not all ‘rescues’ may be warranted. Some animals are more likely to be brought into a rescue center than others,...
Article
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1. The success of conservation initiatives often depends on the inclusion of diverse stakeholder interests in the decision-making process. Yet, there is a paucity of empirical knowledge concerning the factors that explain why stakeholders door do not-believe that they are meaningfully represented by government agencies. 2. Our study provides insi...
Article
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Green infrastructure is an increasingly popular strategy to simultaneously address challenges associated with urbanization and global environmental change, including increased flooding and rising temperatures. While many cities aim to expand green infrastructure to deliver ecosystem services, their impacts will be limited without significant uptake...
Article
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There is increasing interest in measuring ecological stability to understand how communities and ecosystems respond to broad-scale global changes. One of the most common approaches is to quantify the variation through time in community or ecosystem aggregate attributes (e.g. total biomass), referred to as aggregate variability. It is now widely rec...
Article
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Snakes are globally threatened due to anthropogenic pressures. Conflicts between snakes and people occur when residents encounter snakes in their home environments. In collaboration with a local business that provides snake removal services, we examined records from over 2000 snake removals in Phoenix metropolitan area, Arizona, United States betwe...
Article
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Despite the social and ecological importance of residential spaces across the country, scant research examines urban yard management policies in the U.S. Governance scholarship points to the implementation challenges of navigating policy language. Our research provides an exploration of yard ordinance language, with implications for communities acr...
Preprint
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It is well recognized that within local communities, fluctuations of constituent species over time can alter both aggregate (e.g., total abundance or biomass) and compositional community properties. At broader spatial scales, recent evidence shows how spatial asynchrony can further stabilize aggregate properties at the regional, or metacommunity, s...
Article
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Many stressors plague bee populations including habitat fragmentation and degradation, as well as pathogens and pesticide exposure. With bee communities at risk, conservation efforts are imperative. Although recent research has examined bee communities across cities, few studies have analyzed variation in human attitudes toward and perceptions of b...
Article
Residential landscapes support human well-being and ecological functioning in urban ecosystems. Trees and native plants in yards and neighborhoods positively influence satisfaction, an important component of human well-being and quality of life. However, these patterns may not hold true in arid ecoregions, where the composition of desert vegetation...
Article
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Global loss of biodiversity and its associated ecosystem services is occurring at an alarming rate and is predicted to accelerate in the future. Metacommunity theory provides a framework to investigate multi-scale processes that drive change in biodiversity across space and time. Short-term ecological studies across space have progressed our unders...
Article
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Context Ecological communities in urban ecosystems are assembled through ecological processes, such as species interactions, dispersal, and environmental filtering, but also through human factors that create and modify the landscape. These complex interactions make it difficult to untangle the relationships between social–ecological dynamics and ur...
Article
Local regulations on residential landscapes (yards and gardens) can facilitate or constrain ecosystem services and disservices in cities. To our knowledge, no studies have undertaken a comprehensive look at how municipalities regulate residential landscapes to achieve particular goals and to control management practices. Across six U.S. cities, we...
Article
In the face of climate change and other environmental challenges, an increasing number of cities are turning to land design to enhance urban sustainability. Land system architecture (LSA)—which examines the role of size, shape, distribution, and connectivity of land units in relation to the system’s social-environmental dynamics—can be a useful per...
Chapter
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The urban development process results in the removal, alteration, and fragmentation of natural vegetation and environmental features, which has negatively impacted many wildlife species (McKinney 2002, Grimm et al. 2008). With the loss of large tracts of intact wildlands (e.g., forests, deserts, and grasslands), and the demise of specific habitat f...
Article
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Although the value of urban ecological infrastructure (UEI) is widely recognized, insufficient research has investigated how people perceive the wide variety of UEI. To address this gap, we investigated residents’ perceptions of the coupled value of aesthetic and biological qualities as related to diverse UEI and other environmental and social fact...
Article
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The active participation of local stakeholders in governing protected areas is increasingly recognized in biodiversity conservation. While progress has been made in countries to facilitate inclusivity in conservation decision-making, there is limited practical guidance of participatory mechanisms enabling stakeholder engagement. Disentangling forma...
Article
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Residential landscaping decisions can have important implications for water use and conservation in urban areas. Yard preferences are generally closely related to actual yard landscapes, but differences in the drivers of and constraints on preferences relative to actual landscaping have not been well explored. In this study, we conducted a resident...
Article
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Problem, research strategy, and findings: Planners lack clarity about how they can promote the subjective wellbeing (SWB) of the communities they serve. In this research we use descriptive and econometric methods to explore the interconnections between three aspects of the objective and perceived neighborhood built environment (NBE)—walkability, tr...
Article
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Research on ecosystem services (ES) has largely focused on the ecological functions that produce services or the economic valuation of the benefits provided by ecosystems. Far less research has examined public perceptions of ES, and more so ecosystem disservices (EDS), despite evidence that ecosystem properties and functions can produce beneficial...
Article
Land change due to urbanization often results in the loss of desert ecosystems. The loss of desert land affects ecological and social processes in arid cities, such as habitat provisioning, the extent and intensity of the urban heat island, and outdoor recreation opportunities. Understanding the human–environment dynamics associated with environmen...
Article
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The science of urban ecology has increasingly grappled with the long‐term ramifications of a globally urbanized planet and the impacts on biodiversity. Some researchers have suggested that places with high species diversity in cities simply reflect an extinction debt of populations that are doomed to extinction but have not yet disappeared. The lon...
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Aim: Seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) of the Caribbean Islands (primarily West Indies) is floristically distinct from Neotropical SDTF in Central and South America. We evaluate whether tree species composition was associated with climatic gradients or geographical distance. Turnover (dissimilarity) in species composition of different islands o...
Article
Full-text available
Seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) of the Caribbean Islands (primarily West Indies) is floristically distinct from Neotropical SDTF in Central and South America. We evaluate whether tree species composition was associated with climatic gradients or geographical distance. Turnover (dissimilarity) in species composition of different islands or amo...
Article
Full-text available
Urban riparian corridors have the capacity to maintain high levels of bird abundance and biodiversity. How riparian corridors in cities are used by waterbirds has received relatively little focus in urban bird studies. The principal objective of our study was to determine how habitat and landscape elements affect waterbird biodiversity in an arid c...
Article
Improvements in global sustainability, health, and equity will largely be determined by the extent to which cities are able to become more efficient, hospitable, and productive places. The development and evolution of urban areas has a significant impact on local and regional weather and climate, which subsequently affect people and other organisms...
Poster
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Modifying or preserving the composition and configuration of a cityscape (i.e., design) is one means to improve the sustainability of urban areas (Turner et al. 2013). Landscape design is defined as the purposeful change of the pattern of a landscape with the goal of modifying or maintaining the ecosystem services provided to meet societal needs (N...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization of arid environments results in biotic communities that differ from the surrounding desert. The growth of cities has lowered biodiversity and increased abundance of generalist species, known as urbanophiles. However, the mechanisms by which specific organisms can dominate urban ecosystems remain unclear. Using an 11-year data set from...

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