Richard Sibly

Richard Sibly
University of Reading · School of Biological Sciences

About

293
Publications
84,345
Reads
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15,460
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
October 1980 - present
University of Reading
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (293)
Article
Full-text available
The northern stock of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a large, high value, slow growing and late maturing fish that is an important target species for both commercial and recreational fisheries. Around the UK, scientific assessments have shown a rapid eight-year decline in spawning stock biomass since 2010 attributed to poor recruitment...
Article
The European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a slow growing and late maturing high value fish that is exploited by both commercial and recreational fisheries. In recent years, scientific assessments have shown a rapid decline in spawning stock biomass around the UK attributed to poor recruitment (driven by environmental factors) and high fishing...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and fishing represent two of the most important stressors facing fish stocks. Forecasting the consequences of fishing scenarios has long been a central part of fisheries management. More recently, the effects of changing climate have been simulated alongside the effects of fishing to project their combined consequences for fish stock...
Article
Full-text available
Fish are increasingly exposed to anthropogenic stressors from human developments and activities such as agriculture, urbanization, pollution and fishing. Lethal impacts of these stressors have been studied but the potential sublethal impacts, such as behavioural changes or reduced growth and reproduction, have often been overlooked. Unlike mortalit...
Article
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Dispersal is a key process affecting population persistence and major factors affecting dispersal rates are the amounts, connectedness and properties of habitats in landscapes. We present new data on the butterfly Maniola jurtina in flower-rich and flower-poor habitats that demonstrates how movement and behaviour differ between sexes and habitat ty...
Article
Full-text available
Soil animals play important roles in ecosystem functioning and stability, but the environmental controls on their communities are not fully understood. In this study, we compiled a dataset of soil animal communities for which the abundance and body mass of multiple soil animal groups were recorded. The mass–abundance scaling relationships were then...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal ability is key to species persistence in times of environmental change. Assessing a species' vulnerability and response to anthropogenic changes is often performed using one of two methods: correlative approaches that infer dispersal potential based on traits, such as wingspan or an index of mobility derived from expert opinion, or a mech...
Article
Juvenile growth curves are generally sigmoid in shape: Growth is initially nearly exponential, but it slows to near zero as the animal approaches maturity. The drop‐off in growth rate is puzzling because, everything else being equal, selection favors growing as fast as possible. Existing theory posits sublinear scaling of resource acquisition with...
Article
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Over recent years the summer feeding distribution of Northeast Atlantic mackerel (NEAM, Scomber scombrus) has expanded from its traditional core in the Norwegian Sea, northwards towards Svalbard, and westward as far as Greenland. Food availability, temperature and an increase in spawning stock biomass (SSB) are reported to be possible drivers of th...
Article
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Maynard Smith's (American Naturalist, 1966, 100, 637) suggestion that in some cases a prerequisite for speciation is the existence of local ecological adaptations has not received much attention to date. Here, we test the hypothesis using a model like that of Maynard Smith but differing in the way animals disperse between niches. In previous studie...
Article
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This Data in Brief article describes data on the movement behaviour of four species of grassland butterflies collected over three years and at four sites in southern England. The datasets consist of the movement tracks of Maniola jurtina, Aricia agestis, Pyronia tithonus, and Melanargia galathea, recorded using standard methods and presented as ste...
Article
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Background: Understanding the factors influencing movement is essential to forecasting species persistence in a changing environment. Movement is often studied using mechanistic models, extrapolating short-term observations of individuals to longer-term predictions, but the role of weather variables such as air temperature and solar radiation, key...
Article
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Global ecosystem change presents a major challenge to biodiversity conservation, which must identify and prioritize the most critical threats to species persistence given limited available funding. Mechanistic models enable robust predictions under future conditions and can consider multiple stressors in combination. Here we use an individual‐based...
Article
Full-text available
Soil respiration represents a major carbon flux between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, and is expected to accelerate under climate warming. Despite its importance in climate change forecasts, however, our understanding of the effects of temperature on soil respiration (RS) is incomplete. Using a metabolic ecology approach we link soil b...
Article
Open access link til Nov 13th: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1XnGs15DJ~tY1P Strategies for the conservation and management of many wild species requires an improved understanding of how population dynamics respond to changes in environmental conditions, including key drivers such as food availability. The development of mechanistic predictive mod...
Article
The ability of animals to adapt to their changing environment will depend in part on shifts in their ranging patterns, but when and why individuals choose to move requires detailed understanding of their decision-making processes. We develop a simple decision-making model accounting for resource availability in habitually used ranges. We suggest th...
Article
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Teleosts such as tunas and billfish lay millions of tiny eggs weighing on the order of 0.001 g, whereas chondrichthyes such as sharks and rays produce a few eggs or live offspring weighing about 2% of adult body mass, as much as 10 000 g in some species. Why are the strategies so extreme, and why are intermediate ones absent? Building on previous w...
Article
Fish population dynamics are affected by multiple ecosystem drivers, such as food-web interactions, exploitation, density-dependence and the wider environment. While tactical management is still dominated by single-species models that do not explicitly account for these drivers, more holistic ecosystem models are used in strategic management. One w...
Method
Full-text available
This is a TRACE document ("TRAnsparent and Comprehensive model Evaludation"), which provides supporting evidence that our model presented in: Nabe-Nielsen J., van Beest F.M., Grimm V., Sibly R.M., Teilmann, J. & Thompson, P.M. (2018). Predicting the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances on marine populations. Conserv. Lett. was thoughtfully designe...
Article
Full-text available
Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to anthropogenic disturbances that cause animals to change behavior and move away from potential foraging grounds. Here we present a process-based modeling framework for assessing population consequences of such sub-lethal behavioral effects. It builds directly on how disturbances influence animal movement...
Article
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Most plant, animal and microbial species of widely varying body size and lifestyle are nearly equally fit as evidenced by their coexistence and persistence through millions of years. All organisms compete for a limited supply of organic chemical energy, derived mostly from photosynthesis, to invest in the two components of fitness: survival and pro...
Article
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Healthy soils are crucial for sustainable food production, but tillage limits the biological regulation of essential ecosystem services. Better understanding of the mechanisms driving management effects on soil ecosystem engineers is needed to support sustainable management under environmental change. 2.This paper presents the EEEworm (Energy – Env...
Article
Stochastic computer simulations are often the only practical way of answering questions relating to ecological management. However, due to their complexity, such models are difficult to calibrate and evaluate. Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) offers an increasingly popular approach to this problem, widely applied across a variety of fields. H...
Data
The ESM give the working needed to derive the recurrence equations linking the genotype frequencies in successive generations, and Fig. A1 which shows how the effects of selection can be visualised.
Article
Full-text available
Genes that in certain conditions make their carriers altruistic are being identified, and altruism and selfishness have shown to be heritable in man. This raises the possibility that genetic polymorphisms for altruism/selfishness exist in man and other animals. Here we characterize some of the conditions in which genetic polymorphisms may occur. We...
Article
Full-text available
Complex computer models are used to predict how ecological systems respond to changing environmental conditions or management actions. Communicating these complex models to non-scientists is challenging, but necessary, because decision-makers and other end users need to understand, accept, and use the models and their predictions. Despite the impor...
Code
This repository includes all of the R and NetLogo code used to generate the new 'population level' results in the following paper, as well as a short guide to using it: van der Vaart, E., Johnston, A.S.A., & Sibly, R.M. "Predicting how many animals will be where: How to build, calibrate and evaluate individual-based models" (2015) Ecological Modell...
Code
This repository includes all of the R and NetLogo code used to generate the new 'population level' results in the following paper, as well as a short guide to using it: van der Vaart, E., Johnston, A.S.A., & Sibly, R.M. "Predicting how many animals will be where: How to build, calibrate and evaluate individual-based models" (2015) Ecological Modell...
Article
Full-text available
The fundamental features of growth may be universal, because growth trajectories of most animals are very similar, but a unified mechanistic theory of growth remains elusive. Still needed is a synthetic explanation for how and why growth rates vary as body size changes, both within individuals over their ontogeny and between populations and species...
Article
Full-text available
1. There is little consensus on how agriculture will meet future food demands sustainably. Soils and their biota play a crucial role by mediating ecosystem services that support agricultural productivity. However, a multitude of site-specific environmental factors and management practices interact to affect the ability of soil biota to perform vita...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the feasibility of using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) to calibrate and evaluate complex individual-based models (IBMs). As ABC evolves, various versions are emerging, but here we only explore the most accessible version, rejection-ABC. Rejection-ABC involves running models a large number of times, with parameters d...
Article
Full-text available
Individual-based models (IBMs) can simulate the actions of individual animals as they interact with one another and the landscape in which they live. When used in spatially-explicit landscapes IBMs can show how populations change over time in response to management actions. For instance, IBMs are being used to design strategies of conservation and...
Article
Full-text available
There is little consensus on how agriculture will meet future food demands sustainably. Soils and their biota play a crucial role by mediating ecosystem services that support agricultural productivity. However, a multitude of site-specific environmental factors and management practices interact to affect the ability of soil biota to perform vital f...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of individual organisms on material cycles and energy fluxes within ecosystems is central to predicting the impacts of human-caused changes on climate, land use, and biodiversity. Here we present a theory that integrates metabolic (organism-based bottom-up) and systems (ecosystem-based top-down) approaches to characterize...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are significant ecosystem engineers and are an important component of the diet of many vertebrates and invertebrates, so the ability to predict their distribution and abundance would have wide application in ecology, conservation and land management. Earthworm viability is known to be affected by the availability and quality of food reso...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are important organisms in soil communities and so are used as model organisms in environ-mental risk assessments of chemicals. However current risk assessments of soil invertebrates are based on short-term laboratory studies, of limited ecological relevance, supplemented if necessary by site-specific field trials, which sometimes are ch...
Article
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There is accumulating evidence that macroevolutionary patterns of mammal evolution during the Cenozoic follow similar trajectories on different conti- nents. This would suggest that such patterns are strongly determined by global abiotic factors, such as climate, or by basic eco-evolutionary processes such as filling of niches by specialization. Th...
Article
Full-text available
There is accumulating evidence that macroevolutionary patterns of mammal evolution during the Cenozoic follow similar trajectories on different continents. This would suggest that such patterns are strongly determined by global abiotic factors, such as climate, or by basic eco-evolutionary processes such as filling of niches by specialization. The...
Article
Current EU regulatory risk assessment allows application of pesticides provided that recovery of non-target arthropods in-crop occurs within a year. Despite long-established theory of source sink dynamics, risk assessment ignores depletion of surrounding populations and typical field trials are restricted to plot-scale experiments. Here, we use age...
Article
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a b s t r a c t Ships and wind turbines generate noise, which can have a negative impact on marine mammal popu-lations by scaring animals away. Effective modelling of how this affects the populations has to take account of the location and timing of disturbances. Here we construct an individual-based model of har-bour porpoises in the Inner Danish...
Article
Full-text available
In mammals, the mass-specific rate of biomass production during gestation and lactation, here called maternal productivity, has been shown to vary with body size and lifestyle. Metabolic theory predicts that post-weaning growth of offspring, here termed juvenile productivity, should be higher than maternal productivity, and juveniles of smaller spe...
Article
Full-text available
Spatio-temporal landscape heterogeneity has rarely been considered in population-level impact assessments. Here we test whether landscape heterogeneity is important by examining the case of a pesticide applied seasonally to orchards which may affect non-target vole populations, using a validated ecologically realistic and spatially explicit agent-b...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods The survival of animal populations is strongly influenced by the individuals’ ability to forage efficiently, yet there are few studies of how populations respond when disturbances cause animals to deviate from their natural foraging behavior. Animals that respond to disturbances by moving away are prevented from access...