Richard Newton

Richard Newton
University of Stirling · Institute of Aquaculture

Doctor of Philosophy

About

42
Publications
50,049
Reads
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1,006
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2014 - present
University of Stirling
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • All aspects of resource efficiency related to global aquaculture value chains.
Education
October 2009 - April 2014
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Aquaculture

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
In recent years, insect meal has received considerable attention as an alternative ingredient for aquaculture feeds. When insects are reared on underutilised biomass streams, the resulting meal can potentially offer a reduced environmental impact compared to fishmeal and soybean meal. However, due to legislative restrictions, insects are commonly r...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic animals are diverse in terms of species, but also in terms of production, the people involved, and the benefits achieved. In this concept piece, we draw on literature to outline how the diversity of aquatic animals, their production, and their consumption all influence their impact within the food system. Built on evidence from an array of...
Article
Efficiency assessments of marine ingredient use in aquaculture are required to fully understand their con- tribution to global seafood supply and their impacts on all UN Sustainable Development Goals. Fish In: Fish Out (FIFO) ratios have become the principal metric used to ensure aquaculture does not negatively impact wild fish stocks. However, sev...
Article
Full-text available
The contribution of seafood to global food security is being increasingly highlighted in policy. However, the extent to which such claims are supported in the current food security literature is unclear. This review assesses the extent to which seafood is represented in the recent food security literature, both individually and from a food systems...
Article
Full-text available
Seafood supply chains are complex, not least in the diverse origins of capture fisheries and through aquaculture production being increasingly shared across nations. The business-to-business (B2B) seafood trade is supported by seafood shows that facilitate networking and act as fora for signaling of perceptions and values. In the Global North, sust...
Data
Seafood supply chains are complex, not least in the diverse origins of capture fisheries and through aquaculture production being increasingly shared across nations. The business-to-business (B2B) seafood trade is supported by seafood shows that facilitate networking and act as fora for signaling of perceptions and values. In the Global North, sust...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainability analyses of aquaculture typically ignore the fate and value of processing by-products. The aim of this study was to characterise the nutritional content of the common processing by-products (heads, frames, trimmings, skin, and viscera) of five important finfish species farmed in Europe; Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), European seabass...
Data
Sustainability analyses of aquaculture typically ignore the fate and value of processing by-products. The aim of this study was to characterise the nutritional content of the common processing by-products (heads, frames, trimmings, skin, and viscera) of five important finfish species farmed in Europe; Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), European seabass...
Article
Full-text available
Fish and other aquatic foods (blue foods) present an opportunity for more sustainable diets1,2. Yet comprehensive comparison has been limited due to sparse inclusion of blue foods in environmental impact studies3,4 relative to the vast diversity of production5. Here we provide standardized estimates of greenhouse gas, nitrogen, phosphorus, freshwat...
Article
EU aquaculture produces only a small fraction of the internal demand of aquatic foods, but boosting this activity must be done in compliance with high standards of environmental protection and social benefits, as fostered by the policies on circular economy recently launched by the EU. Nevertheless, the assessment of the environmental sustainabilit...
Article
Full-text available
Trends in aquatic food consumption were matched against farm production surveys within Hubei province and compared to official production data and statistics. Surveys showed that consumer tastes were changing to a much broader aquatic food menu as their spending power increased. Traditional aquaculture species were becoming less profitable due to r...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This document aims to provide an overall picture of the status of the implementation of processes related to circular economy in EU aquaculture, under current regulatory framework regarding aspects of health and safety, commercialisation and environmental protection. Opportunities for the valorisation of inputs from other processes to aquaculture a...
Article
Full-text available
EU funded #EURASTIP (2017-2019) attempted to translate tech and innovation platforms from Europe to the Asian context. We examined how this translation process affects the form and function of these platforms. We found this translation process to be of a non-linear and pluriform nature. The paper reports on the results of a guided reflection with k...
Article
Full-text available
Efficiency assessments of marine ingredient use in aquaculture are required to fully understand their contribution to global seafood supply and their impacts on all UN Sustainable Development Goals. Fish In: Fish Out (FIFO) ratios have become the principal metric used to ensure aquaculture does not negatively impact wild fish stocks. However, sever...
Article
Full-text available
The larvae of black soldier fly (BSF) have shown great promise in transforming organic wastes into a more valuable larval biomass. Importantly, after insects have been harvested the remaining by-product, comprised of the spent substrate and frass (insect faeces), has the potential to be used as a biofertiliser. Three field-scale experiments to inve...
Article
Full-text available
Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids—eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids—are essential components of human diets and some aqua and animal feeds, but they are sourced from finite marine fisheries, and are in short supply and deficient in large parts of the world. We use quantitative systems analysis to model the current global eicosapentaenoic acid...
Article
The dominant sustainable seafood narrative is one where developed world markets catalyze practice improvements by fisheries and aquaculture producers that enhance ocean health. The narrow framing of seafood sustainability in terms of aquaculture or fisheries management and ocean health has contributed to the omission of these important food product...
Article
Full-text available
China is the world's largest capture fisheries and aquaculture producer. Over recent decades, China's domestic marine catch composition has changed markedly, from large volumes of a few high‐valued food species to multiple, small, low‐valued, species, a significant proportion of which is primarily used as animal, especially fish, feed. Despite the...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainable development is an overarching objective that requires an interdisciplinary approach in order to address the societal challenge concerning climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials. In this context, valorization of abundant and available bio-wastes with high potential to manufacture value-added products is the fi...
Article
Aquaculture is receiving increased attention from a variety of stakeholders. This is largely due to its current role in the global food system of supplying more than half of the seafood consumed, and also because the industry continues to steadily expand (UN Food and Agriculture Organization 2018). A recent article in Environmental Research Letters...
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture is receiving increased attention from a variety of stakeholders. This is largely due to its current role in the global food system of supplying more than half of the seafood consumed, and also because the industry continues to steadily expand (UN Food and Agriculture Organization 2018). A recent article in Environmental Research Letters...
Article
Full-text available
The numbers of alerts from the EU's Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) related to crustacean products were compared to numbers of mainstream media stories related to health concerns. An internet search of “farmed shrimp” was also conducted and the content of the websites assessed for subject matter and balance. The study found that the ab...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The European Union relies on seafood imports to supply growing demand that European production has failed to meet. Politically motivated media reports have denigrated competing imports in favour of local production. While life cycle assessment (LCA) measures global impact of value chains, it often fails to contextualise them. Using LCA, thi...
Article
Since 2000, the use of wild fish inputs in the production of farm raised fish outputs, also known as the Fish In:Fish Out (FI:FO) ratio, has been a primary concern of the sustainability dialogue surrounding aquaculture production. Far less attention has been placed on the sustainability of downstream processing, including how byproducts are managed...
Article
Sustainable intensification (SI) is defined and interpreted in terms of a framework to support production of farmed aquatic animals in Asia and their trade with Europe. A novel holistic perspective to value chain analysis, informed by a range of sustainability tools, is used to explain the dynamic in the trade that is having significant impacts on...
Poster
Full-text available
Insect-based transformation of organic wastes could support upcycling of low-value resources by converting them into a sustainable source of feed (insect biomass) and biofertiliser (insect frass). It was demonstrated in Ghana, a low-income developing country (LIDC), that consistent high quality Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) larval meal coul...
Article
Full-text available
The status and potential of aquaculture is considered as part of a broader food landscape of wild aquatic and terrestrial food sources. The rationale and resource base required for the development of aquaculture are considered in the context of broader societal development, cultural preferences and human needs. Attention is drawn to the uneven deve...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Model to identify the amounts of seafood by-productIn available, regionally, that could be redirected from waste to marine ingredients use
Article
Full-text available
We investigated aquaculture production of Asian tiger shrimp, whiteleg shrimp, giant river prawn, tilapia, and pangasius catfish in Bangladesh, China, Thailand, and Vietnam by using life cycle assessments (LCAs), with the purpose of evaluating the comparative eco-efficiency of producing different aquatic food products. Our starting hypothesis was t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As livestock and fish production intensifies, the requirement for quality feeds is also growing. The effective management of waste is of serious concern in Ghana and other low income developing countries. Meanwhile the reliance on imported feed ingredients and fertilisers has been a constraint to aquaculture and agriculture industry growth. Transfo...
Article
Full-text available
In an effort to evaluate environmental sustainability, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been implemented in the EU FP7 SEAT project (www.seatglobal.eu). LCA has its own series of ISO standards (14040-14044). ISO 14040 identifies four phases for an LCA: goal and scope definition, life cycle inventory analysis, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) and...
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture has often been criticized for its environmental impacts, especially efficiencies concerning global fisheries resources for use in aquafeeds among others. However, little attention has been paid to the contribution of coproducts from aquaculture, which can vary between 40% and 70% of the production. These have often been underutilized an...
Article
Full-text available
This report is based on the outcome of the study on "Prospective analysis of the aquaculture sector in the EU", launched and coordinated by the JRC (IPTS) and carried out by the University of Stirling. The report consists of two parts: 1) "Prospective analysis of the aquaculture sector in the EU – Part 1: Synthesis report", and 2) "Prospective anal...
Article
Full-text available
This report is based on the outcome of the study on "Prospective analysis of the aquaculture sector in the EU", launched and coordinated by the JRC (IPTS) and carried out by the University of Stirling. The report consists of two parts: 1) "Prospective analysis of the aquaculture sector in the EU – Part 1: Synthesis report", and 2) "Prospective anal...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
To provide active packaging from seafood waste streams that improves the shelf-life of seafood products up to the consumer, thus reducing waste throughout the seafood value chain.
Project
GAIN Green Aquaculture Intensification in Europe (GAIN) is designed to support the ecological intensification of aquaculture in the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA), with the dual objectives of increasing production and competitiveness of the industry, while ensuring sustainability and compliance with EU regulations on food safety and environment. Eco-intensification of European aquaculture is a transdisciplinary challenge that requires the integration of scientific and technical innovations, new policies and economic instruments, as well as the mitigation of social constraints. Successful eco-intensification of aquaculture will provide more and better aquatic products, more jobs, and improve trade balance by reducing imports. GAIN, besides looking at innovative ways of integrating cultured species, will seek integration with other sectors, in order to promote the implementation of the principles of circular economy in aquaculture. The GAIN Consortium includes a wide range of complementary expertise and a well-blended mix of research institutes and industrial partners, which will ensure the achievement of the following specific objectives: Develop and optimize sustainable feeds, without increasing the pressure on land and fish stocks; Add value to cultivation, by means of innovative processes, which turn both by-products and side-streams into valuable secondary materials, thus increasing profits and minimizing the environmental footprint; Improve the management of finfish and shellfish farms, in terms of FCR, fish welfare and reduction of wastes, through the use of sensors, biomarkers, Big Data, IoT (Internet of Things) and predictive mathematical models; Support integrated policies and address current barriers to the implementation of the principles of circular economy in aquatic production.