Richard Selwyn Jones

Richard Selwyn Jones
Monash University (Australia) · School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment

BSc (Hons) | MSc | PhD

About

28
Publications
6,172
Reads
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771
Citations
Introduction
Main research interests include polar ice sheet history, Southern Hemisphere palaeoclimate, ice sheet (in)stability mechanisms, and developing the applications of cosmogenic surface-exposure dating.
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - October 2019
Durham University
Position
  • Fellow
June 2015 - September 2016
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2012 - present
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Various positions associated with the courses of Applied Geomorphology, Field Geomorphology, Advanced Physical Environmental Processes, Ice & Climate, and Antarctic Studies.
Education
September 2008 - August 2009
Royal Holloway, University of London
Field of study
  • Quaternary Science
October 2005 - June 2008
University of Gloucestershire
Field of study
  • Physical Geography

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Outlet glaciers grounded on a bed that deepens inland and extends below sea level are potentially vulnerable to 'marine ice sheet instability'. This instability, which may lead to runaway ice loss, has been simulated in models, but its consequences have not been directly observed in geological records. Here we provide new surface-exposure ages from...
Article
Full-text available
Cosmogenic-nuclide surface-exposure data provide important constraints on the thickness, extent and behaviour of ice masses in the geological past. A number of online calculators provide the cosmogenic nuclide community with a means of easily calculating surface-exposure ages. Here we provide a platform for plotting and analysing such data. This pa...
Article
Full-text available
Modern observations appear to link warming oceanic conditions with Antarctic ice sheet grounding-line retreat. Yet interpretations of past ice sheet retreat over the last deglaciation in the Ross Embayment, Antarctica’s largest catchment, differ considerably, and imply either extremely high or very low sensitivity to environmental forcing. To inves...
Article
Outlet glaciers drain the majority of ice flow in the Antarctic ice sheet. Theory and numerical models indicate that local bed topography can play a key role in modulating outlet glacier response to climate warming, potentially resulting in delayed, asynchronous, or enhanced retreat. However, the period of modern observations is too short to assess...
Preprint
Many ice shelves in Antarctica experience surface melt each summer, with potentially severe consequences for sea level rise. However, large interannual and regional variability in surface melt increases uncertainty in predictions of how ice shelves will react to climate change. Previous studies of surface melt have usually focused on either a proce...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative satellite observations only provide an assessment of ice sheet mass loss over the last four decades. To assess long-term drivers of ice sheet change, geological records are needed. Here we present the first millennial-scale reconstruction of David Glacier, the largest East Antarctic outlet glacier in Victoria Land. To reconstruct chang...
Article
Full-text available
A new luminescence erosion meter has huge potential for inferring erosion rates on sub-millennial scales for both steady and transient states of erosion, which is not currently possible with any existing techniques capable of measuring erosion. This study applies new rock luminescence techniques to a well-constrained scenario provided by the Beinn...
Article
Full-text available
Numerical models predict that discharge from the polar ice sheets will become the largest contributor to sea-level rise over the coming centuries. However, the predicted amount of ice discharge and associated thinning depends on how well ice sheet models reproduce glaciological processes, such as ice flow in regions of large topographic relief, whe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Numerical models predict that discharge from the polar ice sheets will become the largest contributor to sea level rise over the coming centuries. However, the predicted amount of ice discharge and associated thinning depends on how well ice sheet models reproduce glaciological processes, such as ice flow in regions of large topographic relief, whe...
Preprint
Full-text available
A new luminescence erosion-meter has huge potential for inferring erosion rates on sub-millennial scales for both steady and transient states of erosion, which is currently not possible with any existing techniques capable of measuring erosion. This study applies new rock luminescence techniques to a well-constrained scenario provided by the Beinn...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantitative satellite observations provide a comprehensive assessment of ice sheet mass loss over the last four decades, but limited insights into long-term drivers of ice sheet change. Geological records can extend the observational record and aid our understanding of ice sheet–climate interactions. Here we present the first millennial-scale reco...
Article
Quantifying the contribution of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) to sea-level rise during the last deglaciation is complicated by the limited opportunities to constrain ice-sheet models. The nunatak, Escalade Peak, provides a gauge for past ice surface elevation changes and behaviour throughout the last glacial cycle. Geomorphological mapping, g...
Article
Full-text available
The role of external forcings in the deglacial ice sheet evolution of the Ross Embayment, Antarctica’s largest catchment, continues to be a highly contested topic. Although numerical ice sheet models indicate that ocean and atmosphere forcings were the main drivers of deglacial ice sheet retreat, these models have difficulty in accurately capturing...
Article
Geological records of past glacier extent can yield important constraints on the timing and magnitude of pre-historic climate change. Here we present a cosmogenic ³He moraine chronology from Mt. Ruapehu in central North Island, New Zealand that records fluctuations of New Zealand's northernmost glaciers over the last 14,000 years. In the Mangaehueh...
Article
Full-text available
Calculating cosmogenic-nuclide surface-exposure ages is critically dependent on a knowledge of the altitude of the sample site. Changes in altitude have occurred through time as a result of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), potentially altering local nuclide production rates and, therefore, surface-exposure ages. Here we assess the impact of GIA...
Article
Constraining Antarctic ice sheet evolution provides a way to validate numerical ice sheet models that aid predictions of sea-level rise. In this paper we collate cosmogenic exposure ages from exposed nunataks in Antarctica that have been used, or have the potential to be used, to constrain rates of thinning of the Antarctic Ice Sheets since the Las...
Article
Beryllium-10 (¹⁰Be) in quartz represents the most common in situ cosmogenic nuclide used for quantifying Earth-surface processes, primarily due to the prevalence of quartz in the Earth's crust. However many landscapes lack quartz-bearing rocks, thus other nuclide-mineral pairs are required for geochronometric and geomorphic applications. Here we de...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding past changes in the Antarctic ice sheets provides insight into how they might respond to future climate warming. During the Pliocene and Pleistocene, geological data show that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet responded to glacial and interglacial cycles by remaining relatively stable in its interior, but oscillating at its marine-based ma...
Article
The extent, basal conditions and retreat history of a Loch Lomond Stadial glacier are reconstructed based on detailed geomorphological and sedimentological assessment. We present new evidence from the vicinity of Coire Ardair that supports the former existence of a warm-based, locally-fed valley glacier, with probable cold-based ice on the surround...
Article
The extent, basal conditions and retreat history of a Loch Lomond Stadial glacier are reconstructed based on detailed geomorphological and sedimentological assessment. We present new evidence from the vicinity of Coire Ardair that supports the former existence of a warm-based, locally-fed valley glacier, with probable cold-based ice on the surround...
Article
Any future changes in the volume of Antarctica’s ice sheets will depend on the dynamic response of outlet glaciers to shifts in environmental conditions. In the Transantarctic Mountains, this response is probably heavily dependent on the geometry of the system, but few studies have quantified the sensitivity of these glaciers to environmental forci...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the millennial-scale behaviour of marine-based sectors of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is critical to improve predictions of the future contribution of Antarctica to sea level rise. Here high-resolution ice sheet modelling was combined with new terrestrial geological constraints (in situ 14 C and 10 Be analysis) to reconstruct th...
Article
Full-text available
We present a diagnostic glacier flowline model parameterized and constrained by new velocity data from ice-surface GPS installations and speckle tracking of TerraSAR-X satellite images, newly acquired airborne-radar data, and continental gridded datasets of topography and geothermal heat flux, in order to better understand two outlet glaciers of th...
Article
Full-text available
The East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is the largest continental ice mass on Earth, and documenting its evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is important for understanding its present-day and future behaviour. As part of a community effort, we review geological evidence from East Antarctica that constrains the ice sheet history throughout t...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract A robust understanding of Antarctic Ice Sheet deglacial history since the Last Glacial Maximum is important in order to constrain ice sheet and glacial-isostatic adjustment models, and to explore the forcing mechanisms responsible for ice sheet retreat. Such understanding can be derived from a broad range of geological and glaciological da...
Article
Full-text available
A robust understanding of Antarctic Ice Sheet deglacial history since the Last Glacial Maximum is important in order to constrain ice sheet and glacial-isostatic adjustment models, and to explore the forcing mechanisms responsible for ice sheet retreat. Such understanding can be derived from a broad range of geological and glaciological datasets an...
Conference Paper
The configuration of Antarctic ice sheets is inherently linked to changes in climate and the encircling oceans. Direct observations of Antarctica have shown that changes are possible on the timescale of years to decades (Pritchard et al., 2012), but ice sheets also respond on longer timescales. Understanding the changes that occurred since the Last...

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