Richard J. Harding

Richard J. Harding
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology | CEH

About

36
Publications
8,415
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2,659
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
1184 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
The global water cycle is a fundamental component of our climate and Earth system. Many, if not the majority, of the impacts of climate change are water related. We have an imperfect description and understanding of components of the water cycle. This arises from an incomplete observation of some of the stores and fluxes in the water cycle (in part...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the competing pressures on water resources requires a detailed knowledge of the future water balance under uncertain environmental change. The need for a robust, scientifically rigorous evidence base for effective policy planning and practice has never been greater. Environmental change includes, but is not limited to, climate change;...
Article
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This study reports the first recorded CO2 flux measurements of a drained and intensively cultivated lowland peatland in the East Anglian Fens (UK) using the eddy covariance technique. Measurements were made over a complete lettuce crop rotation and a subsequent fallow period. Maximum average daytime CO2 uptake and nocturnal loss rates were -10.39 a...
Article
The integration of scientific knowledge about possible climate change impacts on water resources has a direct implication on the way water policies are being implemented and evolving. This is particularly true regarding various technical steps embedded into the EU Water Framework Directive river basin management planning, such as risk characterisat...
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Water-related impacts are among the most important consequences of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Changes in the global water cycle will also impact the carbon and nutrient cycles and vegetation patterns. There is already some evidence of increasing severity of floods and droughts and increasing water scarcity linked to increasing greenh...
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Six land surface models and five global hydrological models participate in a model intercomparison project (WaterMIP), which for the first time compares simulation results of these different classes of models in a consistent way. In this paper the simulation setup is described and aspects of the multi-model global terrestrial water balance are pres...
Article
The Arctic has already warmed significantly, and warming of 4-7 °C is expected over the next century. However, linkages between climate, the carbon cycle, the energy balance, and hydrology mean that the response of arctic ecosystems to these changes remains poorly understood. The release by warming of considerable but poorly quantified carbon store...
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Full-text available
Water is essential for all life is and occurs in various natural stores of the Earth’s hydrological cycle, including lakes, wetlands, rivers and aquifers. However, natural spatial and temporal variability in climate means that water of sufficient quantity and adequate quality is not always available for human needs (drinking, growing crops, generat...
Article
Gross rainfall, net rainfall and stemflow were measured in a mixed deciduous woodland in southern England over a period of 14 months. Continuous measurements of standard weather data and momentum and sensible heat fluxes between the forest canopy and the atmosphere accompanied the investigation. The gross rainfall was corrected for catch losses due...
Article
Terrestrial ecosystems sequester 2.1 Pg of atmospheric carbon annually. A large amount of the terrestrial sink is realized by forests. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties are being collected at many sites around the world, but...
Article
Terrestrial ecosystems sequester 2.1 Pg of atmospheric carbon annually. A large amount of the terrestrial sink is realized by forests. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties are being collected at many sites around the world, but...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial ecosystems sequester 2.1 Pg of atmospheric carbon annually. A large amount of the terrestrial sink is realized by forests. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties are being collected at many sites around the world, but...
Article
Previous work has described how rainfall from several storms showed persistent patterns with a length-scale of the order of 10–20 km, and suggested that a land–atmosphere feedback was responsible. As a first step in examining this mechanism, a two-dimensional model is used to simulate the response of a squall line to idealized variability of bounda...
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Full-text available
The Sahel has experienced several drought periods in the past 500 years, however no available records show a drought as persistent and severe as the one that started in the 1960s (Nicholson 1978). Many thousands of people died and many more suffered severe disruption of their lives in the severe phases of this drought (e.g. in 1984). The human dram...
Article
The UK Meteorological Office Surface Exchange Scheme (MOSES), which is currently implemented within Version 3 of the Hadley Centre GCM, was tested for an arctic peatland site in northern Finland (Kevo). This implementation of MOSES incorporated a new depth-dependent parameterization of the thermal and hydraulic properties of peat with parameter val...
Article
The Sahel has experienced a prolonged period of below average rainfall since the 1960s, and a number of studies have linked this to anthropogenic changes in vegetation. Previous numerical modelling experiments have shown that taking locally observed vegetation changes and extrapolating them over the entire region results in substantial reductions i...
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Full-text available
A number of general circulation model (GCM) experiments have shown that changes in vegetation in the Sahel can cause substantial reductions in rainfall. In some studies, the climate sensitivity is large enough to trigger drought of the severity observed since the late 1960s. The extent and intensity of vegetation changes are crucial in determining...
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This study examines thermally induced flows (or "snow breezes") associated with snow cover in the boreal forests of Canada. Observations from a lake less than 4 km across were made as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) winter field campaign. These are interpreted with the aid of idealized three-dimensional mesoscale model simula...
Article
A mesoscale version of the UK Meteorological Office Unified Model has been used to study the evolution of the planetary boundary layer over heterogeneous terrain in the HAPEX-Sahel region. The model simulates a typical diurnal cycle during the dry down period of the intensive observation period on 8 October 1992. The model has a grid length of 10 k...
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Full-text available
Methane effluxes from wetland areas of Scotland were estimated by using the boundary-layer budget method by collecting air samples with an aircraft upwind and downwind of an area of extensive peatland. Nocturnal local area methane fluxes were also estimated at a peat bog site. Loch More, located at 58 degrees 24'N 03 degrees 36'W, using the concent...
Article
Using soil moisture observations from a forest area in the U.K. and from forest and grassland sites in southern Sweden, a range of simple, daily soil moisture deficit models were tested. Each model consists of potential evaporation, interception losses, and a routine by which transpiration was calculated from the potential via a soil water regulati...
Article
Parameterization of the boundary conditions between the atmosphere and cryosphere is an important part of the general problem of modelling climatic change. It is necessary to define the mass, momentum and energy exchanges at the ice/atmosphere interface in order (i) to use atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) to predict future climate and...
Article
Parameterization of the boundary conditions between the atmosphere and cryosphere is an important part of the general problem of modelling climatic change. It is necessary to define the mass, momentum and energy exchanges at the ice/atmosphere interface in order (i) to use atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) to predict future climate and...
Article
Full-text available
In March and May 1983 a field experiment was undertaken to measure the energy exchanges across the surface of a snow-covered, frozen lake on the Hardanger Plateau in southern Norway. Radiation and evaporation were measured directly and the downward heat flux estimated from profile measurements of wind and temperature. The changes of the water equiv...
Article
A portable, wet-surface lysimeter system, for measuring the in situ interception characteristics of short to medium height vegetation is described. The system, comprising an electronic balance and meteorological sensors linked to a microcomputer, has been used successfully at a number of U.K. sites of widely varying topography. In this paper, resul...
Article
Synopsis The climate of the Inner Hebrides is considered as a variant (a) of the climate of the British Isles, and (b) of the European Atlantic seaboard. Its chief characteristics are wetness, and mildness—expressed as minimal variation of temperature both diurnally and seasonally. Other features are the marked effect of topography, particularly on...

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