Richard A Fuller

Richard A Fuller
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Biological Sciences

PhD, University of Durham

About

345
Publications
145,593
Reads
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24,230
Citations
Citations since 2016
208 Research Items
19038 Citations
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Introduction
In our lab we study how people have affected the natural world around them, and how some of their destructive effects can best be reversed. On the flip side, we are also keen to understand whether and how people can benefit positively from experiences of biodiversity. Visit us at: http://www.fullerlab.org Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fullerlab
Additional affiliations
March 2008 - present
The University of Queensland
April 2004 - March 2008
The University of Sheffield
September 1999 - June 2003
Durham University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (345)
Article
Full-text available
Nature within cities will have a central role in helping address key global public health challenges associated with urbanization. However, there is almost no guidance on how much or how frequently people need to engage with nature, and what types or characteristics of nature need to be incorporated in cities for the best health outcomes. Here we u...
Article
Full-text available
There is mounting empirical evidence that interacting with nature delivers measurable benefits to people. Reviews of this topic have generally focused on a specific type of benefit, been limited to a single discipline, or covered the benefits delivered from a particular type of interaction. Here we construct novel typologies of the settings, intera...
Article
Migratory species depend on a suite of interconnected sites. Threats to unprotected links in these chains of sites are driving rapid population declines of migrants around the world, yet the extent to which different parts of the annual cycle are protected remains unknown. We show that just 9% of 1451 migratory birds are adequately covered by prote...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas vary enormously in their contribution to conserving biodiversity, and the inefficiency of protected area systems is widely acknowledged. However, conservation plans focus overwhelmingly on adding new sites to current protected area estates. Here we show that the conservation performance of a protected area system can be radically im...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human-induced threats are severely impacting biodiversity globally. Although protected areas play an essential role in safeguarding biodiversity from anthropogenic threats, the performance of such areas in tropical countries remains poorly understood. Here we examined the capacity of protected areas in Bangladesh to represent biodiversity, and iden...
Article
Humanity is on a pathway of unsustainable loss of the natural systems upon which we, and all life, rely. To date, global efforts to deliver internationally‐agreed goals to reduce carbon emissions, halt biodiversity loss, and retain essential ecosystem services, have been poorly integrated. All these goals rely in part on preserving natural (e.g. na...
Article
Full-text available
As the number of observations submitted to the citizen science platform iNaturalist continues to grow, it is increasingly important that these observations can be identified to the finest taxonomic level, maximizing their value for biodiversity research. Here, we explore the benefits of acting as an identifier on iNaturalist.
Preprint
Full-text available
Effective conservation of migratory species relies on protection throughout their annual cycle ¹ , something that has not been assessed globally for migratory insects. Here, we develop seasonal ecological niche models for 405 migratory butterfly species globally to assess whether they are adequately covered by protected areas (PAs) across their ful...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity offsets aim to counterbalance the residual impacts of development on species and ecosystems. Guidance documents explicitly recommend that biodiversity offset actions be located close to the location of impact because of higher potential for similar ecological conditions, but allowing greater spatial flexibility has been proposed. We ex...
Preprint
Full-text available
Effective conservation of migratory species relies on protection throughout their annual cycle, something that has not been assessed globally for migratory insects. Here, we develop seasonal ecological niche models for 405 migratory butterfly species globally to assess whether they are adequately covered by protected areas (PAs) across their full a...
Article
Full-text available
Each year, billions of birds migrate across the globe, and interpretation of weather radar signals is increasingly being used to document the spatial and temporal migration patterns in Europe and America. Such approaches are yet to be applied in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), one of the most species-rich and threatened flyways in the wo...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic pressures are driving insect declines across the world. Although protected areas (PAs) play a prominent role in safeguarding many vertebrate species from human-induced threats, insects are not widely considered when designing PA systems or building strategies for PA management. We review the effectiveness of PAs for insect conservatio...
Article
Every year, millions of birds migrate between breeding and nonbreeding habitat, but the relative numbers of animals moving between sites are difficult to observe directly. Here we propose FlywayNet, a discrete network model based on observed count data, to determine the most likely migration links between regions using statistical modelling and eff...
Data
While systematic biodiversity surveys are common in the Global North, much of the tropics remains vastly under-surveyed. With the rise in popularity of social media and camera phones, millions of people are now sharing their photographs online, which can be an effective source of biodiversity occurrence data. Here, we report on just such an exercis...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of the status of tidal flats, one of the most extensive coastal ecosystems, have been hampered by a lack of data on their global distribution and change. Here we present globally consistent, spatially-explicit data of the occurrence of tidal flats, defined as sand, rock or mud flats that undergo regular tidal inundation. More than 1.3 m...
Article
Full-text available
Changing human behaviour and social systems are key to reversing the global biodiversity crisis. Pro‐environmental behaviour is guided by values and connection with nature, but because they have mostly been studied separately, the interplay between values and nature connection in influencing pro‐environmental behaviour remains unclear. In particula...
Preprint
Full-text available
Citizen science programmes are becoming increasingly sophisticated and popular among those with an interest in natural history, but remain the domain of a relatively small portion of the public and heavily biased toward certain areas. Although systematic recording of biodiversity data has been practiced for centuries in the Global North, many tropi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Citizen science programmes are becoming increasingly sophisticated and popular among those with an interest in natural history, but remain the domain of a relatively small portion of the public and heavily biased toward certain areas. Although systematic recording of biodiversity data has been practiced for centuries in the Global North, many tropi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Several hundred butterfly species show some form of migratory behaviour. Here we identify how the methodologies available for studying butterfly migration have changed over time, and document geographic and taxonomic foci in the study of butterfly migration. We review publications on butterfly migration published in six languages [English, Simplifi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Insects dominate the biosphere, driving ecosystem processes and functions that sustain humanity, yet insect populations are plummeting worldwide1. Massive conservation efforts will be needed to halt and reverse these declines2,3. Protected areas (PAs) could play a decisive role in safeguarding insect species from extinction4, but progress so far in...
Article
A person’s health and wellbeing are contingent on the amount of social support that they receive. Similarly, experiencing nature has been shown to improve people’s health and wellbeing. However, we do not know how relationships between social cohesion, nature experiences and nature connection could interrelate and vary across different types of urb...
Article
Full-text available
International policy is focused on increasing the proportion of the Earth’s surface that is protected for nature1,2. Although studies show that protected areas prevent habitat loss3–6, there is a lack of evidence for their effect on species’ populations: existing studies are at local scale or use simple designs that lack appropriate controls7–13. H...
Article
Establishing marine reserves is particularly challenging in highly populated coastal areas where stakeholders compete for resources and space, such as the Mediterranean Sea. While large-scale conservation planning is useful, there is a need for finer-grained assessments at local and regional scales. Yet fine scale environmental and socioeconomic da...
Article
The success of urban forest management strategies is dependent on public support for and engagement with urban trees. Satisfaction with urban trees and their management, and the level of trust people have in urban tree managers, are useful for understanding public opinions. Yet these concepts, and the mechanisms leading to the formation of public o...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple languages being spoken within a species' distribution can impede communication among conservation stakeholders, the compilation of scientific information, and the development of effective conservation actions. Here, we investigate the number of official languages spoken within the distributions of 10,863 bird species to identify which spec...
Article
Maximising survey efficiency can help reduce the tradeoff between spending limited conservation resources on identifying population changes and responding to those changes through management. Burrow‐nesting seabirds are particularly challenging to survey because nests cannot be counted directly. We evaluated a stratified random survey design for ge...
Article
Full-text available
Mobility restrictions imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic present a useful study system for understanding the temporal and spatial patterns of green space use. Here, we examine green space characteristics and sociodemographic factors associated with change in frequency of green space use before and during a COVID-19 lockdown in Brisbane, Australia...
Article
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Biological atlas data can be used as inputs into conservation decision-making, yet atlases are sometimes infrequently updated, which can be problematic when the distribution of species is changing rapidly. Despite this, we have a poor understanding of strategies for efficiently updating biological atlas data. Using atlases of the distributions of 1...
Article
Full-text available
Nature experiences have been linked to mental and physical health. Despite the importance of understanding what determines individual variation in nature experience, the role of genes has been overlooked. Here, using a twin design (TwinsUK, number of individuals = 2,306), we investigate the genetic and environmental contributions to a person's natu...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal wetlands around the world have been degraded by human activities. Global declines in the extent of important habitats including mangroves, salt marsh and tidal flats necessitate mitigation and restoration efforts, however some well‐meaning management actions, particularly mangrove afforestation and breakwater construction, can inadvertently...
Article
Full-text available
Context Nomadism is a movement strategy in response to non-seasonal environmental variability. Knowledge of nomadic species movements is poor but is necessary to understand life histories and develop appropriate conservation strategies. Objectives We provide a first quantification of nomadism among Australia’s arid bird community, which is presume...
Article
Full-text available
Natural ecosystems globally have been disrupted by anthropogenic activities, and the current biodiversity extinction rate exceeds the natural extinction rate by 1000-fold. Protected areas (PAs) help insulate samples of biodiversity from these human-induced threats; however, assessments of the factors threatening biodiversity in PAs are scarce in So...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory connectivity describes the extent to which migratory species' populations are connected throughout the annual cycle. While recognized as critical for understanding the population dynamics of migratory species and conserving them, empirical evidence of links between migratory connectivity and population dynamics are uncommon. We analyzed a...
Article
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Urban landscapes present substantial opportunities for biodiversity conservation with residential gardens offering some of the greatest potential conservation gains given that they represent a significant proportion of the total greenspace in urbanised landscapes. However, knowledge of wildlife ecology within gardens remains scarce, likely due to t...
Article
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Designating protected and conserved areas is a critical component of biodiversity conservation. The 10th Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 2010 set global targets for the areal extent of protected areas (PAs) that were met partially in 2020, yet a new, more ambitious target is needed to halt ongoing global biodiversity loss. China recentl...
Preprint
Institutional arrangements are key for problem-solving; therefore, pandemics require a strong governance response. While a plethora of ideas about prevention actions for pandemics have been advanced, there has been relatively limited consideration for how those can be operationalized through governance macro structures, particularly within the cont...
Article
Full-text available
Earth is undergoing a devastating extinction crisis caused by human impacts on nature, but only a fraction of society is strongly concerned and acting on the crisis. Understanding what determines people's concern for nature, environmental movement activism, and personal conservation behavior is fundamental if sustainability is to be achieved. Despi...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: We assessed the spatial distribution of four different types of avian specialization throughout Europe, identifying landscape features associated with specialization, and quantifying where the Natura 2000 network intersects with areas of high avian specialization. Location: Europe Time period: Present day Taxa studied: European breeding bi...
Article
Full-text available
A growing number of policies and programmes in cities aim to increase the time people spend in nature for the health and wellbeing benefits delivered by such interactions. Yet, there is little research investigating the extent to which, and for whom, nature experiences deliver such benefits outside Europe, North America, and Australia. Here, we ass...
Conference Paper
Urban trees are recognized as critical for biodiversity, health, well-being, and climate-adaptation. As trees age and increase in size, they provide more significant benefits, such as cooling and shade. While many cities have ambitious plans to increase tree numbers and canopy cover, cities also struggle to maintain and increase tree numbers. This...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the seasonal movements of migratory species underpins ecological studies. Several hundred butterfly species show migratory behaviour, yet the spatial pattern of these migrations is poorly understood. We developed climatic niche models for 405 migratory butterfly species globally to estimate patterns of seasonal movement and the distri...
Article
Full-text available
Population estimates are commonly generated and used in conservation science. All estimates carry inherent uncertainty, but little attention has been given to when and how this uncertainty limits their use. This requires an understanding of the specific purposes for which population estimates are intended, an assessment of the level of uncertainty...
Article
The Ramsar Convention is the centrepiece of international efforts for wetland conservation, aiming to maintain the ecological character of wetlands through holistic ecosystem management. Here, we review studies on shorebird populations at individual Australasian Ramsar sites and compare these against original listings under Criterion 6 to determine...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Burrowing seabirds are important in ecological and conservation terms. Many populations are in flux due to both negative and positive anthropogenic impacts, but their ecology makes measuring changes difficult. Reliably recording key metrics, the proportion of burrows with breeding pairs and the success of breeding attempts requires burrow‐...
Article
Full-text available
Record climate extremes are reducing urban liveability, compounding inequality, and threatening infrastructure. Adaptation measures that integrate technological, nature-based, and social solutions can provide multiple co-benefits to address complex socioecological issues in cities while increasing resilience to potential impacts. However, there rem...
Article
Article Impact Statement: Protecting natural areas and improving the quality of anthropogenic landscapes as habitat are both needed to achieve effective conservation. Abstract: Anthropogenic impacts have reduced natural areas but increased the area of anthropogenic landscapes. There is debate about whether anthropogenic landscapes (e.g., farmland...
Article
Shortfalls in our knowledge of the most basic parameters, such as overall range and population size, ensure evidence-based conservation of poorly known or ‘missing’ species is inherently difficult. Often, the only source of such knowledge is anecdotal reports, which are usually considered too unreliable to be of value. Methods that help conservatio...
Article
Many migratory shorebird species using the East Asian–Australasian Flyway are declining rapidly. While the loss of staging habitats in East Asia is considered the primary cause, stressors to fitness often occur throughout the geographic range of declining species, and threats in the non-breeding grounds have been comparatively poorly studied. Three...
Article
Full-text available
Background In-flight conditions are hypothesized to influence the timing and success of long-distance migration. Wind assistance and thermal uplift are thought to reduce the energetic costs of flight, humidity, air pressure and temperature may affect the migrants’ water balance, and clouds may impede navigation. Recent advances in animal-borne long...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Executive Summary: Urban street trees are recognised as being important to people and wildlife in Ballarat, but not a lot is known about how trees contribute to social and biodiversity benefits. To help fill this gap, a research group led by the University of Melbourne has partnered with the City of Ballarat to quantify the social and ecological...
Article
Full-text available
Spending time in nature is one potential way to cope with the negative physical and psychological health impacts from major stressful life events. In 2020, a large fraction of the global population was impacted by restrictions to contain the spread of the COVID‐19 outbreak, a period characterised by marked health risks and behavioural changes. Here...
Article
Full-text available
To achieve broad-based public support for conservation policies and actions, we need to understand what strengthens a person’s connection to nature, since that has been shown to translate into environmentally protective attitudes and behaviour. We conducted a national survey in Singapore to investigate the associations of family values (biospheric,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Burrowing seabirds are important in commercial, ecological and conservation terms. Many populations are in flux owing to both negative and positive anthropogenic impacts, but their ecology makes measuring changes difficult. Reliably recording key metrics, the proportion of burrows with breeding pairs, and the success of breeding attempts, requires...
Article
Full-text available
Cities currently harbour more than half of the world's human population and continued urban expansion replaces natural landscapes and increases habitat fragmentation. The impacts of urbanisation on biodiversity have been extensively studied in some parts of the world, but there is limited information from South Asia, despite the rapid expansion of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Population estimates are commonly generated and used in conservation science. All estimates carry inherent uncertainty, but little attention has been given to when and how this uncertainty limits their use. This requires an understanding of the specific purposes for which population estimates are intended, an assessment of the level of uncertainty...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maximising survey efficiency can help reduce the trade-off between spending limited conservation resources on evaluating performance of past interventions and directing those resources towards future interventions. Seabird responses to island eradications are often poorly evaluated owing to financial, logistical and methodological challenges associ...
Preprint
Full-text available
The impact of invasive species at seabird breeding islands causes a breakdown of important ecological functions such as prey consumption and nutrient transfer, and elevates extinction risk in impacted taxa. Eradicating invasive species from islands can result in substantial short-term recovery of seabird populations and consequently the prevalence...
Article
Insect populations including butterflies are declining worldwide, and they are becoming an urgent conservation priority in many regions. Understanding which butterfly species migrate is critical to planning for their conservation, because management actions for migrants need to be coordinated across time and space. Yet, while migration appears to b...