Richard Cottrell

Richard Cottrell
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

PhD Quantitative Marine Science
Working on all things aquaculture sustainability

About

28
Publications
12,262
Reads
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925
Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Aquaculture Sustainability, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania
Additional affiliations
August 2021 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2021 - present
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Fellow
February 2020 - August 2021
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
March 2016 - January 2020
University of Tasmania
Field of study
  • Quantitative Marine Science
September 2012 - September 2013
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Ecosystem-based management of marine systems
October 2004 - June 2007
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
With the human population expected to near 10 billion by 2050, and diets shifting towards greater per-capita consumption of animal protein, meeting future food demands will place ever-growing burdens on natural resources and those dependent on them. Solutions proposed to increase the sustainability of agriculture, aquaculture, and capture fisheries...
Article
Full-text available
Sudden losses to food production (that is, shocks) and their consequences across land and sea pose cumulative threats to global sustainability. We conducted an integrated assessment of global production data from crop, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries sectors over 53 years to understand how shocks occurring in one food sector can create diverse...
Article
Full-text available
With the global supply of forage fish at a plateau, fed aquaculture must continue to reduce dependence on fishmeal and oil in feeds to ensure sustainable sector growth. The use of novel aquaculture feed ingredients is growing, but their contributions to scalable and sustainable aquafeed solutions are unclear. Here, we show that global adoption of n...
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture policy often promotes production of low‐trophic level species for sustainable industry growth. Yet, the application of the trophic level concept to aquaculture is complex, and its value for assessing sustainability is further complicated by continual reformulation of feeds. The majority of fed farmed fish and invertebrate species are pr...
Article
The capacity for aquaculture to provide an alternative source of fish and seafood to capture fisheries was once promoted as a tool to reduce demand for wild fish and thus tackle overfishing. To date, there is little evidence to suggest that aquaculture growth has successfully reduced fishing effort on wild populations. Recent theory on ‘blue transi...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale seaweed aquaculture in the ocean is being pursued globally as a solution to many contemporary challenges, including climate change, food security, and ecosystem degradation. However, the required development and transformation of marine systems for farming may have unknown implications for sustainability objectives, such as those outlin...
Article
Full-text available
Mariculture (marine and brackish water aquaculture) has grown rapidly over the past 20 years, yet publicly-available information on the location of mariculture production is sparse. Identifying where mariculture production occurs remains a major challenge for understanding its environmental impacts and the sustainability of individual farms and the...
Article
Full-text available
The adoption of sustainable new foods could potentially reduce the environmental burden of human food production if they can reduce demand for products with higher environmental impact. However, there is little empirical evidence for how frequent food consumption declines are when new foods are introduced, limiting our knowledge of the potential fo...
Article
Sustainable farming of fish requires their feed to be responsibly sourced. New research illustrates how we could convert industrial carbon emissions into a valuable feed resource.
Article
Full-text available
With human food production a major driver of global environmental change, there is increasing recognition of the importance of shifting towards more sustainable dietary patterns. With wholesale dietary change notoriously difficult to implement at scale, various new food analogues have emerged to serve as qualitatively similar (e.g., taste, texture)...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal regions are essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) given their importance for human habitation, resource provisioning, employment, and cultural practice. They are also regions where different ecological, disciplinary, and jurisdictional boundaries both overlap and are obscured. We thus propose the land-sea interface...
Article
Cell‐based seafood is an emerging novel food, with many start‐up companies aspiring for ocean conservation benefits through expanded market share that displaces wild‐caught seafood. However, the ability for cell‐based seafood to achieve this conservation outcome is often oversimplified and will rely on an extensive, and we find somewhat tenuous, ch...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns are creating health and economic crises that threaten food and nutrition security. The seafood sector provides important sources of nutrition and employment, especially in low-income countries, and is highly globalized, allowing shocks to propagate. We studied COVID-19-related disruptions, impacts, and...
Article
The United States seafood industry is undergoing rapid change, as a result of the current trade war with China, ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic, and new governance mandates. The Executive Order on Promoting American Seafood Competitiveness and Economic Growth , signed in May 2020, proposes wild-capture fisheries deregulation and prioritization of...
Article
Full-text available
Effective management of aquatic resources, wild and farmed, has implications for the livelihoods of dependent communities, food security, and ecosystem health. Good management requires information on the status of harvested species, yet many gaps remain in our understanding of these species and systems, in particular the lack of taxonomic resolutio...
Article
Full-text available
The US seafood sector is susceptible to shocks, both because of the seasonal nature of many of its domestic fisheries and its global position as a top importer and exporter of seafood. However, many data sets that could inform science and policy during an emerging event do not exist or are only released months or years later. Here, we synthesize mu...
Article
Full-text available
Feeding a growing, increasingly affluent population while limiting environmental pressures of food production is a central challenge for society. Understanding the location and magnitude of food production is key to addressing this challenge because pressures vary substantially across food production types. Applying data and models from life cycle...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns are creating health and economic crises that threaten food and nutrition security. The seafood sector provides important sources of employment and nutrition, especially in low-income countries, and is highly globalized, allowing shocks to propagate internationally. We use a resilience ‘action cycle’ fr...
Preprint
Full-text available
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, common government actions have been geared towards increasing social distancing, which has had consequent effects on businesses and livelihoods. In the US, the seafood sector has been hit hard by responses to COVID-19. Under normal conditions, most seafood expenditure is in restaurants, which influences seafood...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is impacting marine ecosystems and their goods and services in diverse ways, which can directly hinder our ability to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), set out under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Through expert elicitation and a literature review, we find that most climate change effects have a wide var...
Article
Climate change, in combination with population growth, is placing increasing pressure on the world's oceans and their resources. This is threatening sustainability and societal wellbeing. Responding to these complex and synergistic challenges requires holistic management arrangements. To this end, ecosystem-based management (EBM) promises much by r...
Article
Full-text available
Fisheries and aquaculture make a crucial contribution to global food security, nutrition and livelihoods. However, the UN Sustainable Development Goals separate marine and terrestrial food production sectors and ecosystems. To sustainably meet increasing global demands for fish, the interlinkages among goals within and across fisheries, aquaculture...
Article
This study employs a uniquely multi-factorial, large-scale design to investigate baseline differences and the effects of a singular outdoor educational program on environmental attitudes, knowledge and behavior among primary and secondary school students educated in four different countries. Statistical modelling approaches employed country of resi...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale and experimental approach: Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic sm...
Data
Summary of Control Treatments. Details of replicate numbers for all combinations of unburied (potted or un-potted) controls under different incubation duration, and temperatures. (TIF)
Data
Summary of Burial Treatments. Details of replicate numbers for all combinations of added organic matter to burial mediums, burial duration, incubation temperature and sediment grain size. (TIF)

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, governments have shut down various parts of their economies to promote social distancing. Already, fishing seasons have been cut short or certain types of fishing (e.g. commercial versus recreational) have been restricted. However, these government actions vary between and within countries (White & Hébert-Dufresne 2020). This presents another natural experiment to see how fish populations and fisheries respond to management interventions. Our goal is to understand the downstream effects of these shutdowns on fisheries, fish populations, and the communities that rely on them. If you are interested in contributing to this project please send an email to Easton.White@uvm.edu. We have also built a crowd-sourced database of COVID-19 related effects on fisheries which is being updated here: https://zenodo.org/record/3866189/
Project
Fisheries & Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project (Fish-MIP) Goal: Bringing together disparate marine ecosystem models to better understand and forecast the long-term impacts of climate change on fisheries and marine ecosystems Our Questions: What is the future of: Fish & Fisheries? Seafood supply? Marine biodiversity? Marine ecosystem functioning? Our Approach: We use similar earth-system models (ESMs) and scenarios (RCPs) as other ISIMIP sectors, with some adaptations to better represent future oceanic climate change. We also aim to use similar shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) based on human population growth and GDP, but again with some adaptations to represent future fishing scenarios in the ocean. See our ISIMIP2a simulation protocol for details. Our Challenges: Marine ecosystem models use very different basic structures to represent food-web or ecosystem components and the links between them. Ecosystem components can be represented by size classes, functional groups, trophic levels, species groups, and life-history stages, whereas links can be represented by who-eats-whom networks, diet composition or energy transfer. Another challenge is that our models do not all use the same input and output variables. Finally, there are limited observational data for historical runs and model validation, and limited data on spatially resolved fishing effort. Our Choices: The ISIMIP2a simulation protocol represents the choices we have made in order to compare as many global and regional models as possible. These include common inputs with respect to climate, physical and chemical data (temperature, currents, salinity, pH, oxygen), biological data (e.g. primary production, phyto- and zooplankton), and fisheries data (effort, catch, fisheries mortality) as well as common outputs including fish biomass and catch as well as other ecosystem parameters Cross-sectoral links: Once Fish-MIP simulation results are available, we will link with other ISIMIP sectors and explore cross-sectoral topics such as biodiversity changes on land and in the sea, changes in global food and animal protein supply, and consequences of land-use changes and nutrient run-off on coastal ecosystems. For more information, please contact the sectoral FISH‐MIP coordinators: Overall Fish-MIP coordinator: Derek Tittensor (Derek.Tittensor@unep-wcmc.org) Coordinator for regional models: Tyler Eddy (t.eddy@oceans.ubc.ca) Coordinators for global models: Eric Galbraith (eric.d.galbraith@gmail.com); William Cheung (w.cheung@oceans.ubc.ca); Heike Lotze (Heike.Lotze@dal.ca) Full details about how to upload results can be found here: https://www.isimip.org/gettingstarted/marine-ecosystems-fisheries/