Riccardo Rodolfo-Metalpa

Riccardo Rodolfo-Metalpa
Institute of Research for Development | IRD · ENTROPIE - Écologie marine tropicale des océans Pacifique et Indien

PhD

About

141
Publications
32,079
Reads
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5,818
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - IRD
Position
  • Senior Scientist (CR1)
February 2011 - June 2012
University of Plymouth
Description
  • EU Project MeDSeA “Mediterranean Sea Acidification under a changing climate”
February 2009 - May 2010
Centre Scientifique de Monaco
Position
  • International Agency Atomic Energy (AIEA), Monaco
Description
  • Project funded by Foundation Prince Albert II of Monaco; “Effect of Ocean Acidification on Mediterranean Biodiversity”

Publications

Publications (141)
Article
Full-text available
Extreme reef environments have become useful natural laboratories to investigate physiological specificities of species chronically exposed to future-like climatic conditions. The lagoon of Bouraké in New Caledonia (21°56′56.16′′ S; 125°59′36.82′′ E) is one of the only reef environments studied where the three main climatic stressors predicted to m...
Article
Full-text available
The crucial role of crustose coralline algae (CCA) in inducing hard coral larval settlement and ensuring the replenishment of coral reefs is widely accepted, and so are the negative effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on both CCA abundance and coral development. However, diversified and well-developed coral reef communities have been recently di...
Article
Sponges are major components of benthic communities across the world and have been identified as potential “winners” on coral reefs in the face of global climate change as result of their tolerance to ocean warming and acidification (OA). Previous studies have also hypothesised that photosymbiont‐containing sponges might have higher productivity un...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, coral bleaching events have continued to recur and intensify. During bleaching, corals expel millions of their symbionts, depriving the host from its main food source. One mechanism used by corals to resist bleaching consists in exploiting food sources other than autotrophy. Among the food sources available in the reefs, dinit...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) is postulated to affect the physiology, behavior, and life‐history of marine species, but potential for acclimation or adaptation to elevated pCO2 in wild populations remains largely untested. We measured brain transcriptomes of six coral reef fish species at a natural volcanic CO2 seep and an adjacent control reef in Papua...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are iconic ecosystems with immense ecological, economic and cultural value, but globally their carbonate-based skeletal construction is threatened by ocean acidification (OA). Identifying coral species that have specialised mechanisms to maintain high rates of calcification in the face of declining seawater pH is of paramount importance...
Article
Full-text available
According to current experimental evidence, coral reefs could disappear within the century if CO2 emissions remain unabated. However, recent discoveries of diverse and high cover reefs that already live under extreme conditions suggest that some corals might thrive well under hot, high-pCO2, and deoxygenated seawater. Volcanic CO2 vents, semi-enclo...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is posing a threat to calcifying organisms due to the increased energy requirements of calcification under high CO2 conditions. The ability of scleractinian corals to cope with future ocean conditions will thus depend on their ability to fulfill their carbon requirement. However, the primary productivity of coral holobionts is l...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Corals populations currently living on the thresholds of their optimal environment, and adapted to extreme conditions have become useful models to predict future coral reefs face to climate change. Natural systems such as semi-enclosed reef systems offer the opportunity to study physiological plasticity of species that have acclimatized and most li...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to current experimental evidence, coral reefs could disappear within the century if CO2 emissions remain unabated. However, recent discoveries of diverse and high cover reefs that already thrive under extreme conditions seem to contradict these projections. Volcanic CO2 vents, semi-enclosed lagoons and mangrove estuaries are unique study...
Article
Full-text available
Coral communities around the world are projected to be negatively affected by ocean acidification. Not all coral species will respond in the same manner to rising CO 2 levels. Evidence from naturally acidified areas such as CO 2 seeps have shown that although a few species are resistant to elevated CO 2 , most lack sufficient resistance resulting i...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change threatens the survival of sclerac-tinian coral from exposure to concurrent ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation; how corals can potentially adapt to this trio of stressors is currently unknown. This study investigates three coral species (Acropora muricata, Acrop-ora pulchra and Porites lutea) dominant in an extreme mangrov...
Article
Full-text available
Due to high phenotypic and genetic variability, the phylogeny of the coral genus Psammocora is intricate (Benzoni et al. 2007, 2010; Stefani et al. 2008a, b). The morphospecies P. contigua (IUCN status: Near Threatened; Sheppard et al. 2014) appears to be a species complex (Stefani et al. 2008a). In order to clarify the phylogeny of P. contigua and...
Article
Full-text available
The phylogeny of Montipora coral genus is complex to resolve regarding its large number of species and the existence of interspecific hybridizations among this genus (van Oppen et al. 2004). Montipora digitata (IUCN status: Least Concerned; DeVantier et al. 2008) has long been considered as a two-morph species, until molecular analyses demonstrate...
Article
Full-text available
Environmentally-induced changes in fitness are mediated by direct effects on physiology and behaviour, which are tightly linked. We investigated how predicted ocean warming (OW) and acidification (OA) affect key ecological behaviours (locomotion speed and foraging success) and metabolic rate of a keystone marine mollusc, the sea hare Stylocheilus s...
Article
Macroalgae are critical components of coral reef ecosystems. Yet, they compete for space with corals, and in case of environmental disturbances, they are increasingly involved in phase-shifts from coral-dominated to macro-algae-dominated reefs. As regard to climate change, ocean acidification (OA) has been shown to be detrimental to corals and coul...
Article
While research on ocean acidification (OA) impacts on coral reefs has focused on calcification, relatively little is known about effects on coral photosynthesis and respiration, despite these being among the most plastic metabolic processes corals may use to acclimatize to adverse conditions. Here, we present data collected between 2016 and 2018 at...
Article
Full-text available
This article reviews the state of coral reefs in French Pacific territories in the context of global change (especially threats linked to climate change). We first outline the specific local characteristics, vulnerabilities, and threats faced by the coral reefs of New Caledonia, French Polynesia and Wallis and Futuna. We also emphasize local and ot...
Article
Full-text available
Reef-building corals typically live close to the upper limits of their thermal tolerance and even small increases in summer water temperatures can lead to bleaching and mortality. Projections of coral reef futures based on forecasts of ocean temperatures indicate that by the end of this century, corals will experience their current thermal threshol...
Article
Comment, depuis plusieurs décennies, la recherche scientifique contribue-t-elle au développement des pays du Sud ? À travers plus de 100 succès emblématiques de la recherche en partenariat, cet ouvrage nous plonge au coeur des grandes questions de développement : oeuvrer pour des sociétés plus justes, lutter contre les maladies, faire face aux risq...
Article
While research on ocean acidification (OA) impacts on coral reefs has focused on calcification, relatively little is known about effects on coral photosynthesis and respiration, despite these being among the most plastic metabolic processes corals may use to acclimatize to adverse conditions. Here, we present data collected between 2016 and 2018 at...
Article
It has long since been noted that minor element (Me) partitioning into biogenic carbonates is sometimes different from Me partitioning into inorganically precipitated carbonates. The prime example is the partitioning coefficient, which might be lower or even higher than the one of inorganically precipitated carbonate. Such a difference is usually t...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change and localized anthropogenic stressors are driving rapid declines in coral reef health. In vitro experiments have been fundamental in providing insight into how reef organisms will potentially respond to future climates. However, such experiments are inevitably limited in their ability to reproduce the complex interactions that...
Article
Full-text available
In situ effects of ocean acidification on carbonate dissolution by microboring flora, also called biogenic dissolution, have only been studied once in tropical environments. Naturally acidified seawaters due to CO2 vents offer a perfect setting to study these effects in temperate systems. Three sites were selected at Ischia (Italy, Mediterranean Se...
Article
Full-text available
Coral bleaching events are predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes depends on many factors, including the magnitude of thermal stress and irradiance. The interactions among these two factors, and in particular with ultra-violet radiation (...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are deteriorating under climate change as oceans continue to warm and acidify and thermal anomalies grow in frequency and intensity. In vitro experiments are widely used to forecast reef-building coral health into the future, but often fail to account for the complex ecological and biogeochemical interactions that govern reefs. Conseque...
Article
The sensitivity of corals and their Symbiodinium to warming has been extensively documented; however very few studies considered that anthropogenic inputs such as metal pollution have already an impact on many fringing reefs. Thus, today, nickel releases are common in coastal ecosystems. In this study, two major reef-building species Acropora muric...
Article
Full-text available
Non-calcifying photosynthetic anthozoans have emerged as a group that may thrive under high pCO2 conditions via increased productivity. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying this potential success are unclear. Here we investigated the impact of high pCO2 on the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) use, in the temperate sea anemone Anemonia v...
Article
Fish exhibit impaired sensory function and altered behaviour at levels of ocean acidification expected to occur owing to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions during this century. We provide the first evidence of the effects of ocean acidification on reproductive behaviour of fish in the wild. Satellite and sneaker male ocellated wrasse (Symphodus...
Article
Full-text available
Conflicting results have been reported for the stable Sr isotope fractionation, specifically with respect to the influence of temperature. In an experimental study we have investigated the stable Sr isotope systematics for inorganically precipitated and biogenic (coral) aragonite (natural and laboratory-cultured). Inorganic aragonite precipitation...
Article
Conflicting results have been reported for the stable Sr isotope fractionation, specifically with respect to the influence of temperature. In an experimental study we have investigated the stable Sr isotope systematics for inorganically precipitated and biogenic (coral) aragonite (natural and laboratory-cultured). Inorganic aragonite precipitation...
Data
Fish exhibit impaired sensory function and altered behaviour at levels of ocean acidification expected to occur owing to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions during this century. We provide the first evidence of the effects of ocean acidification on reproductive behaviour of fish in the wild. Satellite and sneaker male ocellated wrasse (Symphodus...
Chapter
Heterotrophy in corals was highlighted first by Yonge and Nicholls (1931a) during the Great Barrier Reef Expedition and by Edmonson who fed zooplankton to corals, kept in darkness, and showed that they remained alive for more than 45 days. The combination of photoacclimation and heterotrophic plasticity in corals allows them to occupy a broad physi...
Article
Full-text available
Excessive CO2 in the present-day ocean-atmosphere system is causing ocean acidification, and is likely to cause a severe biodiversity decline in the future, mirroring effects in many past mass extinctions. Fossil records demonstrate that organisms surviving such events were often smaller than those before, a phenomenon called the Lilliput effect. H...
Article
Excessive CO2 in the present-day ocean–atmosphere system is causing ocean acidification, and is likely to cause a severe biodiversity decline in the future1, mirroring effects in many past mass extinctions2, 3, 4. Fossil records demonstrate that organisms surviving such events were often smaller than those before5, 6, a phenomenon called the Lillip...
Article
Excessive CO2 in the present-day ocean–atmosphere system is causing ocean acidification, and is likely to cause a severe biodiversity decline in the future, mirroring effects in many past mass extinctions. Fossil records demonstrate that organisms surviving such events were often smaller than those before, a phenomenon called the Lilliput effect. He...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of ocean acidification alone or in combination with warming on coral metabolism have been extensively investigated, whereas none of these studies consider that most coral reefs near shore are already impacted by other natural anthropogenic inputs such as metal pollution. It is likely that projected ocean acidification levels will aggrav...
Article
Bacterial communities at a CO2 vent (pH 6.7) were compared with those at control (pH 8.0) and transition sites (pH 7.6) using 16S rRNA metagenomics. Firmicutes and unclassified bacteria dominated across all sites, Proteobacteria, especially Gammaproteobacteria, declined, and Epsilonproteobacteria increased in the vent with an increase in Bacteroide...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is thought to be a major threat to coral reefs: laboratory evidence and CO2 seep research has shown adverse effects on many coral species, although a few are resilient. There are concerns that cold-water corals are even more vulnerable as they live in areas where aragonite saturation (Ωara) is lower than in the tropics and is fa...
Article
A general decline in coral calcification has been observed in response to ocean acidification. It has recently been shown that heterotrophic feeding (the acquisition of organic nutrients) enables one massive coral species to maintain its calcification rates while exposed to ocean acidification but the consequences of higher seawater partial pressur...
Data
Excessive CO2 in the present-day ocean-atmosphere system is causing ocean acidification, and is likely to cause a severe biodiversity decline in the future, mirroring effects in many past mass extinctions. Fossil records demonstrate that organisms surviving such events were often smaller than those before, a phenomenon called the Lilliput effect. H...
Data
Ocean acidification is thought to be a major threat to coral reefs: laboratory evidence and CO2 seep research has shown adverse effects on many coral species, although a few are resilient. There are concerns that cold-water corals are even more vulnerable as they live in areas where aragonite saturation (Omega ara) is lower than in the tropics and...
Article
Full-text available
Specimens of the patellogastropod limpet Patella caerulea were collected within (pHlow-shells) and outside (pHn-shells) a CO2 vent site at Ischia, Italy. Four pHlow-shells and four pHn-shells were sectioned transversally and scanned for polymorph distribution by means of confocal Raman microscopy. The pHlow-shells displayed a twofold increase in ar...
Article
Specimens of the patellogastropod limpet Patella caerulea were collected within (pH low -shells) and outside (pH n -shells) a CO 2 vent site at Ischia, Italy. Four pH low -shells and four pH n -shells were sectioned transversally and scanned for polymorph distribution by means of confocal Raman microscopy. The pH low -shells displayed a twofold in-...
Article
Full-text available
A natural pH gradient caused by marine CO2 seeps off Vulcano Island (Italy) was used to assess the effects of ocean acidification on coccolithophores, which are abundant planktonic unicellular calcifiers. Such seeps are used as natural laboratories to study the effects of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, since they cause long-term changes...