Ricardo Padron

Ricardo Padron
University of Virginia | UVa · Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

PhD, Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

About

51
Publications
1,638
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149
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
88 Citations
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Introduction
Ricardo Padron currently works at the Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, University of Virginia. Ricardo does research in World Literatures.

Publications

Publications (51)
Chapter
The Spanish Pacific designates the space Spain colonized or aspired to rule in Asia between 1521 -- with the arrival of Ferdinand Magellan -- and 1815 -- the end of the Manila-Acapulco galleon trade route. It encompasses what we identify today as the Philippines and the Marianas, but also Spanish America, China, Japan, and other parts of Asia that...
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This essay examines various moments in the history of the sixteenth-century representation of the Strait of Magellan and the South Sea that illustrate some of the ways that the early modern Spanish geopolitical imagination resisted the ongoing invention of America as a continent separate from Asia. In this series of visions of what we can call tran...
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Some of the most noted contributors to the ongoing invention of America, the Spanish historians Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo and Francisco López de Gómara, include extensive material about Spain’s efforts to colonize insular Southeast Asia in their landmark histories of the Indies. These often-neglected narratives of what Gómara calls Spain’s “Enter...
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All too often, we interpret early modern cartographic materials through the lens of contemporary ideas about global geography, which tend to emphasize the importance of what has been called “the architecture of the continents.” Yet the early modern geographical imagination did not map the world exclusively through the framework provided by the cont...
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Magellan’s discovery that the distance from the New World to the Spice Islands was much greater than anyone had expected it to be is often identified as a crucial turning point in the ongoing invention of America as a continent separate and different from Asia. This chapter examines how Antonio Pigafetta’s narrative of the first circumnavigation of...
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Conventional narratives of early modern European exploration and discovery emphasize the process by which the New World came to be understood as a landmass of continental status that was geographically separate from Asia and host to a range of natural phenomena and human cultures that were significantly different from those of the Old World, relega...
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The Spanish attempt to map East and Southeast Asia as the transpacific west does not seem to have survived the sixteenth century. Although Spanish officialdom continued to map the Philippines as a place "to the west" of Spanish America until the nineteenth century, few if any Spaniards continued to think of the rest of the region as somehow Spanish...
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While Ribadeneira forged a millenarian vision of the progress of Christianity across the Atlantic and the Pacific, the official historians of Spain’s imperial enterprise worked to incorporate the Indies of the West into a public, official vision of the Spanish Indies. Antonio de Herrera y Tordesillas’s abortive Historia general adapts the earlier c...
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In the new era of transpacific colonization and trade initiated by Miguel López de Legazpi and Andrés de Urdaneta, some Spaniards expected that the Philippines would serve as a staging ground for spectacular conquests on the Asian mainland. The only war for control of China that was ever fought, however, played out on paper, as Spanish Sinophobes c...
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The establishment of a Spanish colony in the Philippines and the discovery of a workable return route from Southeast Asia to Mexico during the 1560s transformed Spain’s relationship with the Pacific and Asia. This chapter examines the geographical and cartographical work of Juan López de Velasco, the first official chronicler-cosmographer of the Co...
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While the previous chapter discussed the political and military dimensions of Spanish cartographic writing, this chapter emphasizes the religious dimensions of the transpacific imagination. Marcelo de Ribadeneira’s 1601 history of the Spanish Franciscan missionary effort in East and Southeast Asia becomes a crucial piece of cartographic writing, wh...
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The Worldmakers: Global Imagining in Early Modern Europe. Ayesha Ramachandran. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015. x + 288 pp. $45. - Volume 70 Issue 2 - Ricardo Padrón
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Full-text available
In this article, I analyze the so-called ‘discovery of the Pacific’ and its implications for Spanish understanding of global geography, in two of the most important early histories of the early encounter with the New World: the works of Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo and Francisco López de Gómara. Their general histories of the Indies tackle the Pacif...
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Since the Philippine Islands were colonized from America, and were governed over the course of more than two centuries from the Viceroyalty of New Spain, Spanish imperial cartography tended to represent this distant colony as part of a trans-Pacific world, tied cartographically to the New World. This effort was part of a larger project of consideri...
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In this, her first book, Sylvia Sellers-García makes the case that “spatial history matters to the social history of knowledge” (19). The mention of “distance” and “documents” in the title points to the well-known fact that Spain’s effort to govern a vast transatlantic empire involved facing the many challenges posed by distance, and that it attemp...
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Full-text available
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María Portuondo’s Secret Science represents one of the most significant contributions to the history of science in early modern Iberia in recent years, as well as a smart and imaginative contribution to the history of science as a whole. The book provides something that has been sorely lacking in the study of maps and mapping in early modern Spain:...
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PimentelJuan. El rinoceronte y el megaterio: Un ensayo de morfologíahistórica. Madrid: Abada, 2010. 316 pp. ISBN: 978-9500303347 (pbk.). $25.00. - Volume 35 Issue 3 - Ricardo Padrón
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“A Sea of Denial” examines the cartographic invention of the Pacific Rim by the Spanish imperial imagination during the long sixteenth century. Guided by the desire to include as much as possible within the line of demarcation established by the Treaty of Tordesillas (1494) and the negotiation of its antimeridian in the 1520s, Castilian mapmakers d...
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In this slim but remarkable volume, Richard Helgerson, one of the most distinguished critics of early modern literature and culture writing today, explores the Italianate poetry of the Renaissance and early modern period through the lens provided by one of Garcilaso's less-studied sonnets, "A Boscán desde la Goleta." He also provides a bilingual an...
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Ricardo Padrón is associate professor of Spanish at the University of Virginia. His article in this issue builds on the argument advanced in The Spacious Word: Cartography, Literature, and Empire in Early Modern Spain (2004). He is working on Spanish interest in the Pacific and Asia during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
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The Americas 61.4 (2005) 732-733 In this book, Ralph Bauer argues that the European encounter with the New World played a significant role in the transformation of European orders of knowledge during the early modern period. According to Bauer, the various asymmetries of status and function between metropolis and periphery that lay at the heart of...
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The Cultural Geography of Colonial American Literatures: Empire, Travel, Modernity. By Bauer Ralph . New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. xiii, 295. Illustrations. Notes. Index. $65.00 cloth. - Volume 61 Issue 4 - Ricardo Padrón
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THE HISTORY OF CARTOGRAPHY in the early modern period has been tied in particular ways to the emergence of both imperialism and modernity. At the center of this argument lie the gridded scale maps that Europeans learned to make in the wake of their rediscovery of Ptolemy's Geography. These new maps supported the emergence of abstract space as a cen...