Ricardo Napoleão de Souza

Ricardo Napoleão de Souza
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Department of Linguistics and English Language

PhD
www.napoleaodesouza.com

About

13
Publications
2,250
Reads
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73
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
University of Helsinki
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2012 - May 2019
University of New Mexico
Field of study
  • Linguistics
March 2010 - June 2012
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (13)
Poster
Full-text available
There is also wide disagreement regarding secondary stress in Portuguese, some of which partly derives from methodological issues and different data sources in previous investigations. This study tackles several issues pertaining to secondary stress by examining the acoustic properties of unstressed syllables in spontaneously produced Brazilian Por...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper presents the building blocks of a comprehensive framework for the typological study of linguistic adaptation, i.e. how languages change in relation to the socio-historical and environmental contexts in which they are used. We showcase a battery of concepts and methods that are geared towards systematically comparing sociolinguistic envir...
Article
Full-text available
Do languages change systematically in certain environments? We spoke to Professor Kaius Sinnemäki, Dr. Francesca Di Garbo, Dr. Eri Kashima and Dr. Ricardo Napoleão de Souza about the work of the GramAdapt project in combining typological and sociolinguistic methods to investigate linguistic adaptation.
Article
Full-text available
Using ten English adjectives, this study tests the hypothesis that the vowels in adjectives in predicative constructions are longer than those in attributive constructions in spoken conversation. The analyses considered a number of factors: occurrence before a pause, lexical adjective, vowel identity, probability given surrounding words, and others...
Article
Full-text available
This study tests the influence of acoustic cues and non-acoustic contextual factors on listeners' perception of prominence in three languages whose prominence systems differ in the phonological patterning of prominence and in the association of prominence with information structure-English, French and Spanish. Native speakers of each language perfo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study uses acoustic data from Spanish, English and Portuguese to determine how domain-initial effects impact unstressed syllables in languages that differ in how lexical stress affects segmental makeup. While previous work suggests domain-initial effects induce spatiotemporal changes only in the very first segment at a prosodic boundary, resul...
Poster
Full-text available
This study examines cross-linguistically rare nasalized vowels in South American languages as a way to disentangle contact-induced change from genetic retention in phonology. Results show that the occurrence of typologically infrequent nasalized vowels (e.g. [ ø̃ ʉ̃ ɤ̃ ]) and of fully symmetrical oral-nasal vowel inventories in the area far exceed...
Presentation
Full-text available
This study investigates the extent to which prolonged intense language contact influences deep phonological patterns such as maximal syllable structure. Languages of the Caucasus, the Pacific Northwest, the Pueblo Area and the Common European Area were compared amongst themselves and against related languages elsewhere. Results suggest that genetic...
Article
‘Special reduction’ refers to instances of extreme phonetic reduction which is restricted to particular words or phrases, usually grammaticalizing constructions (going to > [gə̃ɾ̃ə̃]), greetings (hi from how are you), discourse markers (Spanish o sea > sa), or other sequences that are often used together. On the basis of data from English, Brazilia...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since Bolinger's [1] discovery that pitch cues accentual prominence in English, a tension has arisen between two strategies: equating accent with pitch excursions and relying on perception for identifying accented words. This paper investigates the relation between prominence judgments from untrained listeners and accentual labels produced by train...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spoken French makes extensive use of dislocations, where one phrase, usually the subject, is set off from the main clause, and within that clause, a pronoun is used. Previous findings are conflicting about the strength of the prosodic boundary, if any, between the dislocation and the main clause. We compare productions of dislocations in conversati...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates the hypothesis that unstressed vowel reduction would lead to the emergence of new syllable patterns in Brazilian Portuguese. Reduction is understood here as the time and gestural compression of phonetic units, which may or may not lead to vowel deletion. A controlled experiment evaluated the acoustic and articulatory correla...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This study aims at disentangling the phonetic effects of domain-initial prominence from those of lexical stress in English, Spanish and Portuguese. It compares unstressed word-initial syllables at IP-initial and IP-medial positions in the three languages while also examining the stressed syllable in the same words. This project contrasts with previous literature by analyzing acoustic data from a large sample of speakers.
Project
This project looks at the types of phonetic change that lead to the emergence of syllable structure, with a focus on consonant clusters. The data come from both controlled experiments and typological investigations, and incorporates prosodic structure as a key variable that influences syllable patterns.