Rhonda Boyle

Rhonda Boyle
Independent Researcher · None

BSc (Hons), M. Urban Planning, M. Env. Sc.

About

10
Publications
22,042
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98
Citations
Introduction
I am involved with private research relating to pianists' hand spans and classical piano playing. Related to this, I am involved in advocacy in relation to the need for piano keyboards with narrower keys. These keyboards are increasingly gaining popularity in North America and are known as ESPKs (ergonomically scaled piano keyboards). For further information, refer to: www.smallpianokeyboards.org, and www.paskpiano.org

Publications

Publications (10)
Poster
Full-text available
A summary of the evidence of the need to move away from the paradigm of today’s ’standard’ keyboard. Available for others to use as desired.
Article
The availability of keyboards with reduced key width has been recently promoted as an ergonomic aid for small-handed pianists to overcome any potential physical disadvantages that may restrict their piano repertoire. However, a lack of biomechanical data exists to support whether reduced piano key size is effective in achieving this outcome. This r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hand span data was collected from 473 adult pianists and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical methods, focusing on differences according to gender, ethnicity and level of acclaim. For comparative purposes, similar data was collected from 216 non-pianist university students and 49 children and teenagers. Gender differences are cons...
Article
Full-text available
I noted with interest your recent editorial in the June 2014 issue about keyboard instruments and fully support your comments. Thank you for mentioning the PASK website (Pianists for Access to Smaller Keyboards, www.paskpiano. org) which I maintain on behalf of pianists around the world who are keen to see change in the "one size fits all" approach...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research by the author has documented the perceived benefits of reduced-size piano keyboards for smaller-handed pianists. This paper reviews the biomechanical and physiological factors that might explain these perceptions. Referring in particular to the work of Otto Ortmann early last century, the factors described include direct mechanic...
Article
Full-text available
Reduced-size piano keyboards are gradually becoming popular with many small-handed pianists in North America but are little known elsewhere in the world. They are also gaining favour among teachers and are the focus of research at a number of American universities. This paper describes the results of a survey of 22 adult pianists who play smaller...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The width of piano keys became standardised approximately 120 years ago, based on the needs of European male pianists. Only recently has piano keyboard size come into question, as more pianists experience the benefits of reduced-size keyboards. There is strong evidence that small-handed pianists are more likely to suffer pain and injury than those...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For around 100 years, there has been a ‘one size fits all’ approach to the piano keyboard, despite the wide variation in hand sizes within the human population. Much of the literature relating hand size to piano playing is in the performing arts medicine field, identifying small hand size as one of the possible causes of pain and injury among piani...
Article
Full-text available
CSIRO's coupled meteorological and pollutant chemical dispersion model, the Air Pollution Model (TAPM), and the EPA Victoria multi-pollutant emission inventory for the Port Phillip region (including Melbourne—covering a region of approximately 24,000km2) were used to simulate 1 year of hourly averaged air pollution concentrations for smog and parti...
Article
Full-text available

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