Renisa Mawani

Renisa Mawani
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Sociology

About

35
Publications
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289
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (35)
Chapter
Vehicles, their infrastructures, and the environments they traverse are fundamental to the movement of migrants and states' attempts to govern them. This volume's contributors use the concept of viapolitics to name and foreground this contested entanglement and examine the politics of migration and bordering across a range of sites. They show how t...
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In this article, I situate Orlando Patterson’s magnum opus, Slavery and Social Death alongside his earlier writings on slavery and slave revolts in Jamaica. To appreciate fully Patterson’s contributions to sociology, comparative historical sociology, and the wider literature on slavery, readers must engage with the full corpus of his scholarly prod...
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Archives and historical records are central to histories of law and legality. Themes and debates in legal history have been shaped, and in some cases even determined by the availability of and access to archival sources. Despite growing critiques of archives as partial, incomplete, and uneven sites of power/ knowledge, ‘the archive’ continues to op...
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Law and settler colonialism is not a self-evident, contained, or straightforward field of inquiry. Rather, it uneasily straddles two overlapping bodies of scholarship: legal histories of colonialism and settler colonial studies. In part one, I place these literatures into conversation to trace their contributions , overlaps, and incommensurabilitie...
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In this essay, I situate Kunal Parker's Common Law, History, and Democracy in America, 1790–1900, within a broader set of intellectual currents engaged with questions of time and temporality. Although Parker's book centers on the common law and history and develops specific conceptions of time, in so doing, he invites legal historians and legal sch...
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I believe that no country ever stood so much in need of a code of laws as India; and I believe also that there never was a country in which the want might so easily be supplied. I said that there were many points of analogy between the state of that country after the fall of the Mogul power, and the state of Europe after the fall of the Roman empir...
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Résumé Cet article explore et interroge les angoisses coloniales que souleva la progéniture mixed, d'origine européenne et autochtone, chez les responsables gouvernementaux et religieux à la fin du XIX e et au début du XX e siècle en Colombie Britannique. M'appuyant sur des correspondances fédérales, provinciales et locales, des documents de missio...
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Résumé Cet article analyse les efforts déployés par des Canadiens d'origine chinoise pour obtenir compensation pour la taxe ( head tax )qm leur fut imposée, en explorant les discours social et politique entourant ce débat ainsi que le cas judiciaire, Mack et al. v. The Attorney General of Canada . Même si cette cause n'a jamais été décidée par les...
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Samera Esmeir’s Juridical Humanity is a significant addition to the expanding literature on law, violence and colonialism. Focused on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Egypt and examining British reforms over animal welfare, women’s and prisoner’s rights, forced peasant labor and the eradication of cotton worms, Esmeir’s book places mode...
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Mawani’s essay reads Julian Go’s Patterns of Empire through the politics of comparison and through a shared intellectual commitment to a postcolonial sociology. Patterns of Empire is an ambitious and challenging book that places sociology at the heart of Anglo-imperial history. Whereas Go makes important contributions to critiques of exceptionalism...
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In this paper I argue that cosmopolitanisms, as visions of living with difference, and race and racisms, as political regimes of subjection and subjectification, are mutually constitutive. Although scholars have made similar claims regarding earlier versions of cosmopolitanisms, developed largely from the work of Immanuel Kant, recent proponents ha...
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The archival turn has followed a long, protracted, and spiraled trajectory through the fields of history, historical anthropology, philosophy, and literary studies. Animated by the cultural turn and shaped by the challenges of poststructuralism, subaltern, and postcolonial studies, critics have formulated history's archive not solely as a repositor...
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Colonial legal histories of indigeneity and British-Indian migration have not often been placed in conversation with one another. This article pursues such a project by tracing indigeneity as a spectral presence that emerged with uneven regularity in juridico-political conflicts over British-Indian migration. Specifically, I focus on the 1914 journ...
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Discussions of hybridity have proliferated in cultural geography and in social and cultural theory. What has often been missing from these accounts are the ways in which mixed-race identities have been forged, contested, and embodied spatially. Inspired by recent calls in cultural geography to rematerialize race and drawing from the growing literat...
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This article commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of The Sociological Imagination by recalling, renewing and updating C. Wright Mills’ pledge to expand a politically aware, self-reflective and publicly accessible intellectual culture between aestheticism and scientism. We begin by sketching how Mills’ ‘bifocal’ vision of the translation between th...
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In this article, I trace the tangled relationships between law, nature, and empire as they figure in Canadian national geographies, imagined and real. While the nature-culture dichotomy has long been contested by cultural geographers, anthropologists, and historians, to date, socio-legal scholars and legal theorists have spent less time problematiz...
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From the late nineteenth century onwards, health has been a technology of governance constitutive of national borders and racial boundaries. As many scholars have documented in various geographical contexts, nineteenth and twentieth-century public health policies have been intricately linked to racialized nation-formation in several ways. Whereas d...
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Between 1998 and 2003, Canadian courts were confronted with two cases that have held significant legal and political consequences for Aboriginal peoples. The cases, R v Gladue (1999) and R v Powley (2003) raised pressing questions about Aboriginal identities and the rights and material resources that follow from legal recognition. In one form or an...
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Stanley Park is the third largest urban park in North America. Located in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), the 960-acre park was opened by civic authorities in 1888, only two years after the city was incorporated. From early on, Stanley Park became a popular leisure space for Vancouver’s ‘citizens’ and visitors alike. Today, as one of the...

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