Renée K Biss

Renée K Biss
University of Windsor · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

27
Publications
3,837
Reads
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382
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
University of Windsor
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2018 - June 2019
York University
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2018 - June 2019
Inner City Family Health Team
Position
  • Medical Professional

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Objective The objective of the present study was to examine the neurocognitive profiles associated with limited English proficiency (LEP). Method A brief neuropsychological battery including measures with high (HVM) and low verbal mediation (LVM) was administered to 80 university students: 40 native speakers of English (NSEs) and 40 with LEP. Res...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Aging is often associated with increasing functional decline as measured by deterioration in mobility and activities of daily living. Older adults (OAs) living in residential long-term care (LTC) homes in particular may not engage in regular physical exercise, significantly increasing their risk of further cognitive and functional decl...
Article
Previous work has shown that older adults with typical age-related memory changes (i.e., without cognitive impairment) pick up irrelevant information implicitly, and unknowingly use that information when it becomes relevant to a later task. Here, we address the possibility that implicit processes play a similarly beneficial role in the cognitive ab...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Older adults (OAs) residing in long-term care (LTC) homes are often unable to engage in adequate amounts of physical activity because of multiple comorbidities, including frailty and severe cognitive impairments. This level of physical inactivity is associated with declines in cognitive and functional abilities and can be further compou...
Preprint
Full-text available
BACKGROUND Older adults (OAs) residing in long-term care (LTC) homes are often unable to engage in adequate amounts of physical activity because of multiple comorbidities, including frailty and severe cognitive impairments. This level of physical inactivity is associated with declines in cognitive and functional abilities and can be further compoun...
Article
This study explored family caregivers’ use of technology to care for people with dementia living at home. Three questions were pursued: (1) what are the important, unmet needs of family caregivers, (2) how do they use technologies to assist in care tasks, and (3) what do health care providers know about caregivers’ needs and technology use? Two com...
Article
Full-text available
This study was designed to replicate earlier reports of the utility of the Boston Naming Test-Short Form (BNT-15) as an index of limited English proficiency (LEP). Twenty-eight English-Arabic bilingual student volunteers were administered the BNT-15 as part of a brief battery of cognitive tests. The majority (23) were women, and half had LEP. Mean...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Forgetting names is a common memory concern for people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and is related to explicit memory deficits and pathological changes in the medial temporal lobes at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the current experiment, we tested a unique method to improve memory for face–name associa...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Institutionalized older adults have high-rates of mobility decline resulting in reduced quality of life and increased dependency. Given the ageing population, there has been a proliferation of exergaming technology targeting older adults to maintain their physical activity (PA) levels and prevent decline. However, it is unclear if exe...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research found that implicit rehearsal of distraction can reduce forgetting for older adults, in part due to their inefficient regulation of irrelevant information. Here, we investigated whether young adults’ memory can also benefit from critical information presented as distraction. Participants recalled a list of words initially and then a...
Poster
User-centered design (UCD) is an important methodology to ensure that technological innovations meet the needs of end-users. Exergaming platforms that aim to support active and healthy aging are available, but few have applied UCD to iteratively co-design exergames with older adults in long-term care homes (LTCHs). This poster describes the usabili...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Many older adults encounter selection difficulties while interacting with handheld touchscreen devices (e.g., tablets, smartphones). Results from mouse trajectory sub-movement analysis with motor impaired users implied that similar analysis of finger trajectory of older adults may help understanding the reasons behind age-related target selection d...
Article
Full-text available
Forgetting people’s names is a common memory complaint among older adults and one that is consistent with experimental evidence of age-related decline in memory for face-name associations. Despite this difficulty intentionally forming face-name associations, a recent study demonstrated that older adults hyperbind distracting names and attended face...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Objective: Physical activity has a powerful protective effect on older adults’ cognition and emotional well-being. For older adults living in long-term care, however, there are limited opportunities for engaging in physical activities, and therefore they are at high-risk of experiencing the consequences of continuous physical inactivity. Older adul...
Article
Difficulty remembering faces and corresponding names is a hallmark of cognitive aging, as is increased susceptibility to distraction. Given evidence that older adults spontaneously encode relationships between target pictures and simultaneously occurring distractors (a hyper-binding phenomenon), we asked whether memory for face–name pairs could be...
Article
Full-text available
In three experiments, we assessed whether older adults' generally greater tendency to process distracting information can be used to minimize widely reported age-related differences in forgetting. Younger and older adults studied and recalled a list of words on an initial test and again on a surprise test after a 15-min delay. In the middle (Experi...
Article
Full-text available
Positive mood states are believed to broaden the focus of attention in younger adults, but it is unclear whether the same is true for older adults. Here we examined one consequence of broader attention that has been shown in young adults: that memory for distraction is greater for those in a positive mood. In the current study, positive and neutral...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Previously relevant information can disrupt the ability of older adults to remember new information. Here, the researchers examined whether prior irrelevant information, or distraction, can also interfere with older adults' memory for new information. Method: Younger and older adults first completed a 1-back task on pictures that wer...
Article
Full-text available
A literature on young adults reports that morning-type individuals, or "larks," report higher levels of positive affect compared with evening-type individuals, or "owls" (Clark, Watson, & Leeka, 1989; Hasler et al., 2010). Morning types are relatively rare among young adults but frequent among older adults (May & Hasher, 1998; Mecacci et al., 1986)...
Article
Full-text available
Emotional states are known to influence how people process relevant information. Here, we address the impact of emotional state on irrelevant information. In this experiment, participants were randomly assigned to a neutral or positive mood induction, and then completed a task that involved viewing a sequence of overlapping pictures and words. They...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research demonstrates that individuals in a positive mood are differentially distracted by irrelevant information during an ongoing task (Rowe et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 104:383-388, 2007). The present study investigated whether susceptibility to distraction shown by individuals in a positive mood results in greater implicit memory for t...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Design exergame for older adults to motivate physical activity in long-term care homes.