René S Shahmohamadloo

René S Shahmohamadloo
Washington State University | WSU · School of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

19
Publications
1,650
Reads
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91
Citations
Introduction
​I am an ecotoxicologist, and my research aims to advance our understanding of human-induced environmental change on ecological and evolutionary processes in wildlife. Specifically, I research pollution-driven adaptation, or “evolutionary ecotoxicology”, which seeks to understand the role of adaptation in organisms that enable populations to thrive in anthropogenically-stressed ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - present
Washington State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2021 - August 2022
University of Guelph
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2017 - January 2021
Ontario Ministry of the Environment
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2016 - September 2020
University of Guelph
Field of study
  • Aquatic Toxicology, Food Security
January 2014 - May 2016
University of Guelph
Field of study
  • Environmental Toxicology
September 2009 - December 2013
University of Guelph
Field of study
  • Toxicology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Article
Cyanotoxins including microcystins are increasing globally, escalating health risks to humans and wildlife. Freshwater fish can accumulate and retain microcystins in tissues; however, uptake and depuration studies thus far have not exposed fish to microcystins in its intracellular state (i.e., cell-bound or conserved within cyanobacteria), which is...
Article
The development of modern, industrial agriculture and its high input‐high output carbon energy model is rendering agricultural landscapes less resilient. The expected continued increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, in conjunction with declining soil health and biodiversity losses, could make food more expensive to produ...
Preprint
Microcystin toxins from harmful algal blooms (HABs) can accumulate and persist in fish, raising dual concerns about human health risks from consumption and the potential for detrimental impacts on fish populations. However, there are fundamental unknowns about the relationship between HABs and fish populations driven by a lack of field information...
Article
Microcystins are toxic heptapeptides produced by cyanobacteria in marine and freshwater environments. In biological samples such as fish, microcystins can be found in the free form or covalently bound to protein phosphatases type I and II. Total microcystins in fish have been quantified in the past using the Lemieux Oxidation approach, where all to...
Article
Microcystins that are cell-bound within Microcystis have demonstrated the ability to cause lethal and reproductive impairment in Daphnia, who constitute an important part of aquatic food chains and are known to feed on viable cyanobacterial cells. Recent advances in environmental toxicogenomics can be used to better understand the mechanistic effec...
Article
Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms dominated by Microcystis frequently produce microcystins, a family of toxins capable of inflicting harm to pelagic and benthic freshwater invertebrates. Research on the effect of microcystins on invertebrates is inconclusive; from one perspective, studies suggest invertebrates can coexist in toxic blooms; however...
Article
Full-text available
Microcystis aeruginosa is a cosmopolitan cyanobacteria that continues to jeopardize freshwater ecosystem services by releasing the hepatotoxin microcystin, which can, in some cases, cause death to aquatic fauna and even humans. Currently, our abilities to understand the mechanisms of microcystin toxicology are limited by the lack of a method for pr...
Article
Microcystin-LR is a toxin commonly produced by the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. It is present in harmful algal blooms and is a concern for both human and environmental health in Canadian freshwater systems. Previous studies have investigated the toxicity of microcystin-LR to other organisms such as fish, however it is important to assess...
Presentation
The presence of plastic particles and fibers, particularly microplastics (<5mm in size), in freshwater lakes and rivers are of growing concern for aquatic life. At the same time, harmful algal blooms, present a threat to wildlife and drinking water quality. Microplastics have been shown to both (1) adsorb and transfer persistent organic pollutants,...
Article
Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial ingredient found in personal care products that include soaps, shampoos, and other sanitation goods. TCS is moderately hydrophobic and has been shown to be resistant to wastewater treatment and thus accumulates in biosolids. Biosolids are commonly applied to agricultural land but little is known about the risk th...
Article
A growing body of evidence suggests that amending soil with biosolids can be an integral component of sustainable agriculture. Despite strong evidence supporting its beneficial use in agriculture, there are concerns that chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), could present a risk to terrestrial ecosystems and human h...
Article
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Investigate the multi-generational impact of dietary exposure to cell-bound microcystin toxins.