Remy Dou

Remy Dou
Florida International University | FIU · Department of Teaching and Learning

PhD, Curriculum & Instruction: STEM Education Research

About

26
Publications
4,039
Reads
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306
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on family science learning in the home and other non-school settings, like zoos and parks. Currently, I lead the "Talking Science" research lab, which investigates and builds on our understanding of family science conversations to support children’s development of STEM identities both in and out of school. The "Talking Science" team highlights the diverse voices and cultures of Latine children and families, and represents members from those communities.
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - September 2021
Florida International University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Dr. Remy Dou is an Assistant Professor and National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) awardee (AISL Award #1846167) with dual appointments in the Department of Teaching and Learning and the STEM Transformation Institute at Florida International University in Miami, Fl. He received his academic degrees at Florida International University: Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and B.S. in Biological Sciences.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Concepts in science education such as “science identity” and “science capital” are informed by dominant epistemological and ontological positions, which translate into assumptions about what counts as science and whose science counts. In this theoretical paper we draw on decolonial and antiracist perspectives to examine these assumptions in light o...
Article
Full-text available
Both in physics education and in science education more generally concerns exist that formal K-12 education structures limit and, in some cases, diminish students’ interest and agency in these fields. Many stakeholders have turned to informal learning experiences as a means to inspire young people to pursue continual learning in these fields in way...
Article
Identity development frameworks provide insight into why and to what extent individuals engage in STEM‐related activities. While studies of “STEM identity” often build off previously validated disciplinary and/or science identity frameworks, quantitative analyses of constructs that specifically measure STEM identity and its antecedents are scarce,...
Article
An individual's sense of themselves as a “STEM person” is largely formed through recognition feedback. Unfortunately, for many minoritized individuals who engage in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) in formal and informal spaces, this recognition often adheres to long‐standing exclusionary expectations of what STEM participat...
Article
Full-text available
Youths of marginalized demographic groups frequently find themselves excluded from participatory discourses in school science. As a result, these students often decide early in their school careers that science is not "for them" and consequently infrequently pursue STEM careers. Efforts to increase diversity of STEM participation have included targ...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the wealth of research exploring science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) identity and career goals in both formal and informal settings, existing literature does not consider STEM identity for undergraduate students pursuing health and medical careers through STEM pathways. We address this gap by examining the STEM identity...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we discuss the connections between individuals' STEM identity development and their childhood experiences, focusing on out-of-school engagement with STEM. This work has led us to home in on STEM-related family conversations and the lasting impression they leave on young people. The majority of the young people we work with identify as...
Article
Full-text available
Like other STEM fields, computer science (CS) lacks representation of minorities, such as Black and Hispanic individuals, both in the number of bachelor’s degrees obtained and the number of individuals in the CS workforce. Out-of-school CS programs are often designed with the intent to inspire young people to pursue careers in CS. Much of this prog...
Article
Full-text available
Theories developed by Tinto and Nora identify academic performance, learning gains, and involvement in learning communities as significant facets of student engagement that, in turn, support student persistence. Collaborative learning environments, such as those employed in the Modeling Instruction introductory physics course, provide structure for...
Article
Full-text available
Course syllabi are a required component of college and university courses. Syllabi present both broader course structuring practices, are a valuable “first impression” of what instructors want to offer their students, and are used as tools in course design. While best teaching practices suggest specific recommendations for syllabi development, ther...
Article
Full-text available
[This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Quantitative Methods in PER: A Critical Examination.] The application of social network analysis (SNA) has recently grown prevalent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education research. Research on classroom networks has led to greater understandings of student persistence in physi...
Article
In this paper, we examine the relationship betweenparticipants’childhood science, technology, engineering,and mathematics (STEM) related experiences, their STEMidentity (i.e., seeing oneself as a STEM person), and theircollege career intentions. Whereas some evidence supportsthe importance of childhood (i.e., K‐4) informal STEMeducation experiences...
Article
In this paper, we examine the relationship between participants’ childhood science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) related experiences, their STEM identity (i.e., seeing oneself as a STEM person), and their college career intentions. Whereas some evidence supports the importance of childhood (i.e., K‐4) informal STEM education expe...
Preprint
Full-text available
The application of social network analysis (SNA) has recently grown prevalent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education research. Research on classroom networks has led to greater understandings of student persistence in physics majors, changes in their career-related beliefs (e.g., physics interest), and their academic success...
Article
Modeling Instruction (MI), an active-learning introductory physics curriculum, has been shown to improve student academic success. Peer-to-peer interactions play a salient role in the MI classroom. Their impact on student interest and self-efficacy – preeminent constructs of various career theories – has not been thoroughly explored. Our examinatio...
Article
Full-text available
Although active learning is supported by strong evidence of efficacy in undergraduate science instruction, institutions of higher education have yet to embrace comprehensive change. Costs of transforming instruction are regularly cited as a key factor in not adopting active-learning instructional practices. Some cite that alternative methods to sta...
Article
Full-text available
From industry to government to academia, attracting and retaining science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors is recognized as a key element of the 21$^{\text{st}}$ century knowledge economy. The ability to retain students seems to be intimately tied with understanding their immersion into the academic and social system of an instituti...
Article
Full-text available
Theories developed by Tinto and Nora identify academic performance, learning gains, and involvement in learning communities as important facets of student engagement that support student persistence. Collaborative learning environments, such as those employed in the Modeling Instruction introductory physics course, are considered especially importa...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing student retention (successfully finishing a particular course) and persistence (continuing through the major area of study) is currently a major challenge for universities. While students' academic and social integration into an institution seems to be vital for student retention, research into the effect of interpersonal interactions is...
Article
Full-text available
The Modeling Instruction (MI) approach to introductory physics manifests significant increases in student conceptual understanding and attitudes toward physics. In light of these findings, we investigated changes in student self-efficacy while considering the construct’s contribution to the career-decision making process. Students in the Fall 2014...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The system that once motivated Americans to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers now presents obstacles to racial and ethnic minorities, women, and the poor. This paper highlights both the advantages and hindrances inherent in STEM professions while advocating for improved access to these pathways.
Conference Paper
Collaborative learning environments in undergraduate introductory physics courses, such as those promoted by Modeling Instruction (MI), influence both student performance and student social interactions. Because collaborative learning is inherently a social activity, we applied Network Analysis methods to examine student social interactions within...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid population growth of under-represented minority groups and the continued under-utilisation of women mean that future growth in the domestic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is linked to greater diversity. Subject-matter career choice, and provide recommendations for practitioners utilising them in STEM edu...
Article
Full-text available
Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion in...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project has two overarching goals: 1) develop an understanding of the salient structures and context of conversations that support STEM identity development in both majority and Hispanic/Latino populations and 2) translate the research outcomes into informal STEM learning practices that contribute to young people’s perception of themselves as STEM professionals.